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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Lion||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lions on Ancient Coins

Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 B.C. and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 B.C., Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
SH91799. Silver stater, cf. SNG BnF 433 (eagle tipped scepter?, Aramaic letter mem under throne), SNG Levante 186 var. (T below throne), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Delepierre -, VF, a little off center, die wear, weight 10.686 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, lotus tipped scepter in right hand, thymiaterion (incense burner) left, BLTRZ (=Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, A(?) below throne; reverse lion advancing left, MZDY (=Mazdai) in Aramaic above; $500.00 (€440.00)
 


Gallic Celts, Carnutes, Beauce Area, c. 41 - 30 B.C.

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The helmeted bust on the obverse is derived from that of Minerva on the Roman Republic denarius of C. Vibius Varus, 42 B.C. (Crawford 494/38, Sydenham 1140).
CE89589. Bronze piastre, CCBM III 119, De la Tour 7105, Delestrée-Tache 2473, Scheers S-M 324 ff., Blanchet 274, aVF, green patina with darker fields, some bumps and scratches, light corrosion, weight 2.923 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 270o, c. 41 - 30 B.C.; obverse PIXTILOS, helmeted head left, the neck adorned with a torque, branch left, ornaments above; reverse PIXTILOS, lion running left, tail curled above the back, two ringed pellets above, stylized bird right below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; scarce; $260.00 (€228.80)
 


Miletos, Ionia, c. 340 - 325 B.C.

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Didyma, on the coast of Ionia, was the largest and most significant sanctuary in the territory of the great classical city Miletus. It contained a temple and oracle of Apollo, the Didymaion. Next to Delphi, Didyma was the most renowned oracle of the Hellenic world, first mentioned among the Greeks in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo, but an establishment preceding literacy and even the Hellenic colonization of Ionia. The 6th century Didymaion, enclosed its smaller predecessor. Its treasury was enriched by gifts from Croesus. To approach it, visitors would follow the Sacred Way to Didyma, about 17 km long. Along the way, were ritual way stations, and statues of members of the Branchidae family, male and female, as well as animal figures. Some of these statues, dating to the 6th century B.C. are now in the British Museum, taken by Charles Newton in the 19th century. The ruins of Didyma are located at a short distance to the northwest of modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.The Didymaion
GS89071. Silver drachm, cf. Marcellesi 3; SNG Cop 957 ff.; BMC Ionia p. 189, 53 ff., gVF, toned, some roughness, weight 3.421 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 325 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse lion standing left, head turned back right, star above, MI monogram before, magistrate’s name in exergue (off flan); ex CNG e-auction 231 (14 Apr 2010), lot 96; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91082. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, extremely crude lion, light marks, weight 2.040 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91084. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, lightly etched surface, obverse off center, weight 2.470 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91085. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, uneven obverse strike, porous etched surfaces, weight 2.374 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91080. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, porous, edge crack, weight 2.161 g, maximum diameter 13.81 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $225.00 (€198.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91083. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, etched surfaces, edge crack, weight 2.249 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Dikaia, Macedonia, 5th Century B.C.

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The referenced Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann coin is very similar, but from different dies. The referenced VAuctions coin, presumably a later issue, is also very similar but with ∆IKAI and a dotted square border around the grapes within a shallower square incuse. Dikaia was located between the rivers Nestos and Hebros.
GS92899. Silver hemiobol, Apparently unpublished in the standard references; Gitbud & Naumann auction 11 (29 Dec 2013), lot 89; cf. VAuctions 270, lot 112 (see notes), VF, well centered on an irregularly shaped flan, toned, earthen deposits, reverse flatly struck, weight 0.295 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, die axis 180o, Dikaia mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse head of lion right; reverse bunch of grapes on stem within incuse square; extremely rare; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Kition, Cyprus, Melekiathon, c. 392 - 361 B.C.

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Kition also known by its Latin name Citium, was a city-kingdom on the southern coast of Cyprus (in present-day Larnaca). It was established in the 13th century B.C. Its most famous, and probably only known, resident was Zeno of Citium, born c. 334 B.C. in Citium and founder of the Stoic school of philosophy which he taught in Athens from about 300 B.C.
GS92809. Silver 1/3 stater, Tziambazis 30; Babelon Perses 707; BMC Cyprus p. xxvi, (i), pl. XIX, 7; Zapiti-Michaelidou -, aVF, struck with worn dies, weight 3.669 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kition mint, c. 392 - 361 B.C.; obverse Melqart-Herakles in fighting stance right, lion skin on arm, club overhead in right hand, bow extended before him in left hand; reverse lion attacking stag crouching right, MLK-ML[...] (in Aramaic) above, all in dotted square border; ex CNG e-auction 413 (31 Jan 2018), lot 120; rare ruler; $165.00 (€145.20)
 




  



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