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The Celator, Journal of Ancient and Medieval Coinage, Complete| - All Issues, Feb/Mar 1987 - May/June 2012

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For 25 years, The Celator was the world's premier journal for ancient coin collectors. It was founded in 1987 by Wayne G. Sayles who published it with the help of family members until 1999 when it was sold to Kerry K. Wetterstrom. Kerry published it for another 13 years. Vol. 1, was published every two months, it was issued monthly thereafter. It was printed in newspaper format from Vol. 1, No. 1 to Vol. 4, No. 8. Thereafter it was a glossy magazine.
BG20514. The Celator, Journal of Ancient and Medieval Coinage, **** COMPLETE| - ALL VOLUMES ****, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (February, 1987) to Vol. 26, No. 5 (May-June, 2012); the first two newsprint volumes a bit browned, nearly all other volumes pristine, most with mailing covers intact; price includes domestic shipping, international shipping at cost; $1200.00 (€1056.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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In ancient Roman religion, Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. In Hellenistic religious tradition, gods were served by priests and goddesses by priestesses but Roma's priesthood was male, perhaps in acknowledgment of the virility of Rome's military power. The highest ranking local elites would contend for the priesthood of the Roma cult.
RB91841. Billon follis, Hunter V 38 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Ticinum 92, SRCV IV 13434, Cohen 64, F, well centered, brown tone, light marks and deposits, weight 6.124 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, fall 307 - spring 308 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONSERVAT VRB SVAE (Guardian of the city traditions), Hexastyle temple on three steps, Roma seated facing within, head left, holding globe in right and spear in left, pediment empty, S T in exergue; $28.00 (€24.64)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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On 31 March 307, after divorcing his wife Minervina, Constantine the Great married Maximian's daughter, Fausta Flavia Maxima.
RB91858. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 228 (S), SRCV IV 13452, Cohen IV 147, Hunter V 21 var. (also laureate), Choice F, full legends, dark patina, weight 5.070 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. late summer 307 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMAINO P F S AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, chlamys around waist and over left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar to left, N right, PLC in exergue; scarce; $40.00 (€35.20)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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This type was apparently minted by Constantius I to provide sufficient coinage for his invasion of Britain in 296 A.D. At one time the type was attributed to the London mint, because of finds there. Learning of the invasion, Allectus' Frankish mercenaries sacked Londinium. They were stopped by the arrival of the Roman flotilla on the Thames. The Franks were slaughtered. After the return of Londinium to Roman control new elaborate and luxurious baths were constructed. The gubernatorial palace and old large forum seem to have fallen out of use around 300, but in general the first half of the 4th century appears to have been prosperous for Britain. The villa estates surrounding London flourished during this period.
RB91860. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 14b (C), Cohen VI 179, SRCV IV 13244, Hunter IV-, F, brown tone, some green patina on reverse, obverse porous, weight 10.814 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 210o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 296 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare shoulder seen from behind; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius of the Roman people standing left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera with right hand, cornucopia in left hand, no controls or mintmark; RIC V lists this type as common but market evidence indicates it is scarce or rare; $40.00 (€35.20)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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An excellent retirement gift! Quies is the personification of rest and retirement. This coin honors the Senior Emperors Diocletian and Maximian after their abdication and retirement in 305 A.D.
BB91862. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 673b, SRCV IV 13394, Cohen VI 490, Hunter V -, aF, well centered, weight 6.796 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 305 - 307 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMIANO BAEATISSIMO SEN AVG (our lord Maximian, most blessed, senior augustus), laureate bust right, wearing imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left hand; reverse PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG (By the providence of the gods, the restful retirement of the Emperors), Providentia on left standing right, extending right hand to Quies, who is standing left with branch in right and leaning on scepter in left, S - F across fields, PTR in exergue; $24.00 (€21.12)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RL91863. Billon follis, RIC VI Roma 71b (S) corr. (obv. leg. not listed), SRCV IV 13254, Cohen VI 179, Hunter V -, VF, nice portrait, centered on a broad flan, brown tone, light earthen deposits, light marks, right side of legends a little weak, weight 9.355 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Rome mint, 297 - 298 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulder, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, R - S flanking across field, H in exergue; rare; $50.00 (€44.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA92322. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399, bust type H (S); Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, Choice aEF, much silvering, well centered, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.606 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (€105.60)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT92327. Billon follis, RIC VI Alexandria 34b, SRCV IV 13283, Cohen VI 184, Hunter V -, gVF, some silvering, centered on a tight flan, weight 9.374 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Alexandria mint, 302 - 303 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius of the Roman people standing slightly, head left, nude but for kalathos on head and chlamys on shoulders and left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, E upper right, S - P across field, ALE in exergue; $130.00 (€114.40)


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

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In 294, Galerius, caesar in the Balkans, proved his worth campaigning on the Danube frontier, fighting the Goths, Marcomanni, Sarmatians, and Carpi. Galerius was assigned the job of land reclamation and repopulation, moving the entire tribe of the Carpi to settlements within the Roman Empire.
RA92335. Billon antoninianus, Bastien XI 657 (9 examples), RIC V-2 Lugdunum 692 (C), SRCV IV 14317, Cohen VI 211, Hunter IV -, VF, well centered, traces of silvering, flow lines, bumps and marks, scattered mild porosity, weight 4.222 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, officina 2, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Mars standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet and military garb, resting right hand on grounded shield, inverted spear in left hand, B in exergue; RIC V lists as common but market evidence indicates they type is at least scarce; $100.00 (€88.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "Jupiter the Protector of the Emperors." The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he was therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RA92341. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 506, SRCV IV 13143, Cohen VI 355, Hunter IV 4 ff. var. (5th officina not listed), Choice EF, superior style for the period, well struck, full borders, some silvering, weight 3.677 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Rome mint, c. 286 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jupiter the protector of the two emperors), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter in vertical in left hand, XXIE in exergue; $150.00 (€132.00)




  







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