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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals||View Options:  |  |  |   

Animals on Ancient Coins

Browse all our coins and antiquities depicting animals below or use the menu on the left to select specific types of animals.

Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||drachm|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD99500. Silver drachm, Meshorer-Qedar 30; Samuels 6; Mildenberg Bes pl. 1, 5; Sofaer -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, edge split, a little rough, weight 2.565 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse horned head of creature facing (griffin?) within square guilloche-pattern border; reverse winged and horned griffin recumbent right, Aramaic dalat (for Delayah?) above left, square guilloche-pattern border, all within an incuse square; extremely rare; $4280.00 (4322.80)


Roman, Bronze Krater Handle Ornamented with Lions, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Metal| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Bronze| |Krater| |Handle| |Ornamented| |with| |Lions,| |c.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
Click here to see the line drawing of Catalogue des bronzes antiques de la Bibliothque National no. 1446, a nearly identical handle in the Bibliothque nationale de France published in 1895.
AM23903. Roman bronze krater handle; cf. BnF Bronzes 1446, Superb, about as made with the addition of an an attractive green patina, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.; 12 cm (4 7/8") tall, on the upper part, which would have been attached atop the rim of the vessel: a lion's head faces inward, its back arching above, between two lions lying in opposite directions, on the lower part: acanthus and scrolls between two snakes with heads upward, ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $2500.00 (2525.00)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 280 B.C.

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |c.| |280| |B.C.||triens|NEW
The triens (plural trientes) was an Ancient Roman bronze coin produced during the Roman Republic valued at one-third of an as.
SH110921. Aes grave (cast) triens, Crawford 14/3 var. (pellets below dolphin); Thurlow-Vecchi 3a var. (same); Haeberlin pl. 39, 15 var. (same); HN Italy 270 var. (same); Sydenham 10, VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, a few flan flaws, weight 83.342 g, maximum diameter 50.5 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, heavy series, c. 280 B.C.; obverse fulmen (thunderbolt), four pellets (mark of value) divided across field; reverse dolphin swimming right, four pellets (mark of value) above; ex CNG auction 90 (23 May 2012), lot 1278; ex L.C. Aes Grave Collection; this coin is the only specimen on Coin Archives and the only specimen known to FORVM with the pellets above the dolphin; extremely rare variant; $2500.00 (2525.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, 323 - 315 B.C., Types of Philip II

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |315| |B.C.,| |Types| |of| |Philip| |II||tetradrachm|NEW
Struck during the nominal rule of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and Alexander IV, the conqueror's young son. They were made kings by Alexander's generals who only used them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by Kassander in 311 B.C.
SH110497. Silver tetradrachm, Troxell Studies 326; Le Rider pl. 46, 3 var. (no pellet); SNG ANS 669 var. (same); SNG Alpha Bank 286 var. (same), VF, well centered, light tone, a few scratches, weight 14.016 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, struck under Polyperchon, c. 318 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, nude youth pacing right on horseback, palm frond in right hand, reins in left hand, stalk of grain below, Π with pellet within below raised left foreleg; $500.00 (505.00)


Roman, Small Bronze Bull, cf. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Metal| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Small| |Bronze| |Bull,| |cf.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
 
AB23906. Small Roman bronze bull, cf. BnF Bronzes 1159 (similar form but larger and more detailed), near Choice, nice green patina, missing three hooves, attractively mounted, bull standing, its tail form forming a loop, 36 mm (1 7/16") long, 33 mm (1 5/16") tall, ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton, FL); $450.00 (454.50)


Anatolia (Uncertain Mint), Late 4th - Early 1st Century B.C.

|Other| |Anatolia|, |Anatolia| |(Uncertain| |Mint),| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||diobol|NEW
When Artemis was a child, she found five gigantic hinds (female deer) grazing in Thessaly and captured four of them to draw her chariot. The fifth escaped across a river to Mt. Cerynaea, on the border of Achaea and Arcadia. The Ceryneian or Golden Hind was sacred to Artemis. Although female, it had golden antlers like a stag and hooves of bronze. It was said that it could outrun an arrow in flight. Artemis allowed Heracles to capture the hind, his third labor, after he promised to liberate the animal after completing his task.
GS99390. Silver diobol, apparently unpublished in references; Gktrk -, Klein -, Rosen -, SNG Kayhan -, et al. -, VF, scratches, weight 1.176 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, late 4th - early 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate and draped, bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver behind shoulder; reverse stag reclining right, head turned back left, K upper left; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $400.00 (404.00)


Ephesos, Ionia (or perhaps Bargylia, Caria or Amyntas, King of Galatia), c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia| |(or| |perhaps| |Bargylia,| |Caria| |or| |Amyntas,| |King| |of| |Galatia),| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||trihemiobol|
The type is most often attributed to Ephesos, but the style and denomination/weight do not strongly support any link to that city. NGC tags for the type note the origin may be Bargylia, Caria. The style certainly fits Bargylia better than Ephesos. The consignor of this coin, a professional numismatist, believes it was struck under Amyntas, King of Galatia, 37 - 25 B.C. Amyntas also issued Artemis and stag types.
GS98643. Silver trihemiobol, cf. SNG Davis 270, SNG Cop -, SNG Kayhan -, SNGvA -, BMC Galatia -, aVF, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 1.337 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; reverse forepart of stag right, head turned back left; extremely rare; $350.00 (353.50)


Egyptian, Late Period, Steatite Scarab, 664 - 332 B.C.

|Scarabs|, |Egyptian,| |Late| |Period,| |Steatite| |Scarab,| |664| |-| |332| |B.C.|
 
AS96352. Egyptian scarab, buff carved steatite, lion running right with tail up, 8.7mm long, Collectible, attractive, from Alex G. Malloy with his certificate of authenticity; $300.00 (303.00)


Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Calpurnius| |Piso| |Frugi,| |90| |B.C.||denarius|NEW
Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was struck to support Rome in the Social War against the Marsic Confederation, the Marsi, Peligni, Piceni, Vestini, Samnites, Frentani, Marrucini, and Lucani. Despite making up over half the Roman army, the Italians had been denied Roman citizenship and denied a fair share of the booty and lands taken in Rome's conquests. In 91 B.C., they rebelled with an army of 100,000 battle-hardened soldiers, most Roman army veterans. In 90 B.C., Rome only just managed to stave off total defeat. After some Roman victories and citizenship concessions, the war was nearly over by 88 B.C. The type has numerous variations and control marks, indicating the enormity of the issue. The head of Apollo and the horseman refer to the Ludi Apollinares, games which were first held in 212 B.C. The following year, the praetor C. Calpurnius Piso, an ancestor of this moneyer, made the games a permanent annual event to honor of Apollo to maintain his support of the public health.
RR110663. Silver denarius, Sydenham, class IV, 671; RSC I Calpurnia 11a; BMCRR p. 255 type III, var. a (unlisted control letters); Crawford 340/1; SRCV 235, gVF, light toning, rev. slightly off center, mild die wear, weight 3.704 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, XVI ligature (mark of value) behind, E below chin; reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm frond, H above, L PISO FRVGI below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 291 (8 Nov 2022), lot 3292; $220.00 (222.20)


Lesbos, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Lesbos,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
The specific satrap has not been confirmed.
SL95876. Billon 1/3 stater, BMC Lesbos 58, pl. XXXI, 3; SNG Cop -; Winzer -, NGC VG, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5 (5872605-037), weight 3.90 g, maximum diameter 14 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain Lesbos mint, 5th - 4th century B.C.; obverse youthful male head (satrap?) left, wearing tight-fitting cap; reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $200.00 (202.00)




  



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