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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals||View Options:  |  |  |   

Animals on Ancient Coins

Browse all our coins and antiquities depicting animals below or use the menu on the left to select specific types of animals.

Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD99500. Silver drachm, Meshorer-Qedar 30; Samuels 6; Mildenberg Bes pl. 1, 5; Sofaer -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, edge split, a little rough, weight 2.565 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse horned head of creature facing (griffin?) within square guilloche-pattern border; reverse winged and horned griffin recumbent right, Aramaic dalat (for Delayah?) above left, square guilloche-pattern border, all within an incuse square; extremely rare; $4750.00 SALE PRICE $4275.00


Sybaris, Lucania, Italy, c. 550 - 510 B.C.

|Italy|, |Sybaris,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |550| |-| |510| |B.C.||nomos|
The origin of this unusual design is difficult to pinpoint (Rutter 1997). It served no practical purpose in facilitating the stacking of coins, since even with matching images in relief and negative, irregularities would have hindered this method of storage. It has been suggested that Pythagoras, who lived in all three of the cities that pioneered incuse coins and died in Metapontum itself, introduced the technique in an attempt to realize in concrete form a confrontation of opposites that was characteristic of the Pythagorean system of thought. Despite the poetic appeal of this suggestion, it seems highly unlikely, considering that the incuse technique appears to have been adopted about twenty years before Pythagoras made it to southern Italy.
SH98006. Silver nomos, Dewing 405, SNG ANS 817, HN Italy 1729, HGC I 1231 (S), F, porous, scratches, weight 6.930 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sybaris mint, c. 550 - 510 B.C.; obverse bull standing left, head turned back right, YM above, dotted border between two circles; reverse incuse of obverse; from the CEB Collection, ex Frank L. Kovacs; scarce; $510.00 SALE PRICE $459.00


Eastern Danubian Celts, 306 - 281 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Eastern| |Danubian| |Celts,| |306| |-| |281| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
The earliest Celtic imitations of Philip II tetradrachms are very similar to the Macedonian originals. It isn't always completely clear if a coin is a Celtic imitative or an oddly engraved Macedonian original. Fairly quickly the imitative inscriptions were shortened and then blundered. Over time the head of Zeus was increasingly "Celticized" and eventually both the head of Zeus and the horseman devolved into barely recognizable abstract forms. This coin with a rather exotic head of Zeus and odd (female?) rider on the reverse, could never be confused with the Macedonian prototype.
CE98735. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 590 (same dies); CCCBM I 28 and pl. XVIII S26; Pink 296 ff.; Gbl OTA 296, De la Tour 9870, VF, centered, radiating flow lines, toned, die wear, small cut above eye, weight 11.808 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 306 - 281 B.C.; obverse Celticized head of Zeus right; reverse naked youth (female?) on horse pacing left, vertical branch in left hand; derived from the Macedonian Kingdom tetradrachms of Philip II; from the CEB Collection; ex Numismatic Fine Arts (NFA) Winter Bid Sale (18 Dec 1987), lot 147; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Celts, Carpathian Region, The Dacian Costoboci(?), c. 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celts,| |Carpathian| |Region,| |The| |Dacian| |Costoboci(?),| |c.| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia||tetradrachm|
The Dacian Costoboci were an ancient people located, during the Roman imperial era, north of Dacia (probably north-east of Dacia), between the Carpathian Mountains and the river Dniester. During the Marcomannic Wars the Costoboci invaded the Roman empire in 170 or 171 A.D., pillaging its Balkan provinces as far as central Greece, until they were driven out by the Romans. Shortly afterwards, the Costoboci's territory was invaded and occupied by Vandal Hasdingi and the Costoboci disappeared from surviving historical sources, except for a mention by the late Roman Ammianus Marcellinus, writing around 400 A.D.
CE99269. Silver tetradrachm, Schnabelpferd type, imitative of Philip II of Macedon; CCCBM I 78 - 79; Gbl OTA pl. 28, 326/1; Lanz 666, VF, toned, marks, small spots of corrosion/encrustation, tight flan, domed obverse, weight 8.248 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 45o, northern Carpathian region mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse Celticized laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Celticized naked youth on horse advancing left, "beak" horse head, rider reduced to dotted outline around curved line; $280.00 SALE PRICE $252.00


Lesbos, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Lesbos,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
The specific satrap has not been confirmed.
SL95876. Billon 1/3 stater, BMC Lesbos 58, pl. XXXI, 3; SNG Cop -; Winzer -, NGC VG, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5 (5872605-037), weight 3.90 g, maximum diameter 14 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain Lesbos mint, 5th - 4th century B.C.; obverse youthful male head (satrap?) left, wearing tight-fitting cap; reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Parium, Mysia, Mid 3rd century A.D.

|Parium|, |Parium,| |Mysia,| |Mid| |3rd| |century| |A.D.||AE| |22|
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. The last Attalid king, Attalus III died without issue and bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic in 133 B.C. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP98177. Bronze AE 22, BMC 83 var. (head left, obv. leg.), SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, BMC Mysia -, gVF, green patina, porous, earthen deposits, weight 4.806 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 90o, Parium (Kemer, Turkey) mint, c. mid 3rd century A.D.; obverse PARIOC CH (or similar) counterclockwise, youthful head of Parius (the mythical founder of the city) right; reverse Capricorn right, cornucopia above, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) counterclockwise below; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Lot of 8 Bronze Cast Dolphins, Olbia, Sarmatia, c. 5th Century B.C.

|Olbia|, |Lot| |of| |8| |Bronze| |Cast| |Dolphins,| |Olbia,| |Sarmatia,| |c.| |5th| |Century| |B.C.||cast| |dolphin|
Small bronze dolphins were cast in Olbia, Thrace, beginning around 550 - 525 B.C., at first as sacrificial objects for the worship of Apollo. Soon after their introduction it seems they were used as an early form of proto-money. Later, when proper coins came into the area, we find the cast bronze dolphins in hoards mixed along with coins, strong evidence that they were still being used as money.
GB99091. Bronze cast dolphin, cf. SGCV I 1684, SNG BM 360 ff., SNG Stancomb 334 ff., SNG Pushkin 12 ff., SNG Cop 67 ff., Olbia (Parutino, Ukraine) mint, c. 5th century B.C.; obverse dolphin with raised eye and dorsal fin; the actual dolphin money specimens in the photograph, no tags or flips, 8 dolphin money specimens; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, 4 silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB99271. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 639; BMC Pontus p. 211, 9; Rec Gen I p. 226, 26; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, aVF, dark patina, spots of corrosion, reverse edge beveled, weight 5.240 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his animal skin cloak flying behind, monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IEPA CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00




  



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