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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals||View Options:  |  |  |   

Animals on Ancient Coins

Browse all our coins and antiquities depicting animals below or use the menu on the left to select specific types of animals.

Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||drachm|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD99500. Silver drachm, Meshorer-Qedar 30; Samuels 6; Mildenberg Bes pl. 1, 5; Sofaer -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, edge split, a little rough, weight 2.565 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse horned head of creature facing (griffin?) within square guilloche-pattern border; reverse winged and horned griffin recumbent right, Aramaic dalat (for Delayah?) above left, square guilloche-pattern border, all within an incuse square; extremely rare; $4750.00 (4512.50)


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit

|Vitellius|, |Vitellius,| |2| |January| |-| |20| |December| |69| |A.D.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||denarius|
"This refers to Vitellius' membership in the priestly college of the quindecimviri Sacris Faciundis, 'fifteen men for the conduct of sacred matters.' This body had care of the Sibylline prophecies and were famous for the opulence of their banquets, a feature of the priesthood which particularly appealed to the gluttonous emperor." -- David R. Sear, Roman Coins and Their Values
RS99193. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC I 109, RSC II 111, BMCRE I 39, BnF III 77, Hunter I 18, SRCV I 2201 (official, solid silver, Rome mint, legend variations), VF, toned, small plating breaks, tiny edge splits, weight 2.984 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 255o, unofficial, counterfeiter's mint, c. 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVG GERM IMP AVO TR P (sic), laureate head right; reverse XV VIR CICR FAC (sic) (fifteen men for the conduct of sacred matters), tripod-lebes of Apollo, dolphin right on top, raven standing right on strut below lebes; ex CNG e-auction 500 (22 Sep 2021), 735 (part of); ex Mercury Group Collection, ex Mike Vosper (25 Jan 2005); $350.00 (332.50)


Anglo-Gallic Aquitaine, Edward I Longshanks, 20 November 1272 7 July 1307, As Duke and Son of Henry III

|France|, |Anglo-Gallic| |Aquitaine,| |Edward| |I| |Longshanks,| |20| |November| |1272| || |7| |July| |1307,| |As| |Duke| |and| |Son| |of| |Henry| |III||denier| |au| |lion|NEW
Edward I was a tall man for his era, at 6'2" (1.88 m), hence the nickname "Longshanks." Henry III ceded the duchy of Aquitaine to Edward in 1252. He ruled as King of England and Lord of Ireland, 20 Nov 1272 - 7 Jul 1307. He was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. Edward fought in the 9th crusade before he became king. He conquered large parts of Wales and he built a series of castles and towns in the countryside and settled them with English people. He attempted to do the same to Scotland but after Philip IV of France (a Scottish ally) confiscated the Duchy of Gascony, Edward went to war with France. He recovered his duchy but the conflict relieved military pressure against Scotland. When the Edward I died, his son was left with a war with Scotland, financial and political problems.
ME99921. Silver denier au lion, Elias 13, SCBC-SII 8013, Duplessy 1037, Poey d'Avant 2786 , aF, toned, small edge cracks, weight 0.858 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Aquitaine mint, as Duke of Aquitaine, 1252 - 1272; obverse + EDVVARD FILI (Edward son of), lion left within inner circle; reverse + h REGIS ANGLIE (Henry King of England), cross patte within inner circle; $300.00 (285.00)


Lesbos, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Lesbos,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
The specific satrap has not been confirmed.
SL95876. Billon 1/3 stater, BMC Lesbos 58, pl. XXXI, 3; SNG Cop -; Winzer -, NGC VG, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5 (5872605-037), weight 3.90 g, maximum diameter 14 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain Lesbos mint, 5th - 4th century B.C.; obverse youthful male head (satrap?) left, wearing tight-fitting cap; reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $225.00 (213.75)


Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 310 - 303 B.C.

|Pantikapaion|, |Pantikapaion,| |Tauric| |Chersonesos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |310| |-| |303| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
Pan is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, fields, groves, mountain wilderness, and wooded glens, hunting, rustic music, theatrical criticism, and companion of the nymphs. He is connected to fertility and the season of spring. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat and is usually represented in the form of a satyr, with a cloak of goat's skin, playing the Syrinx, or flute of seven pipes, and holding the pedum or pastoral staff.
GB99928. Bronze AE 20, SNG BM 869, SNG Cop 30, MacDonald Bosporus 69, HGC 7 113, SGCV I 1700, VF, centered on a tight flan, green patina, weight 7.187 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 330o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 310 - 303 B.C.; obverse bearded horned head of Pan right; reverse ΠAN, forepart of griffin left, sturgeon left below; $200.00 (190.00)


Tripolis, Lydia, 193 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Tripolis,| |Lydia,| |193| |-| |268| |A.D.||AE| |19|
The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP99406. Bronze AE 19, Choice VF, attractive contrasting dark fields and brassy high points, GRPC Lydia IV 18; BMC Lydia p. 366, 18; SNG Hunterian 2019; SNG Righetti 1112; Weber 6956; Waddington 2664; Mionnet Suppl. VI 565, weight 4.320 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Tripolis (near Yenicekent, Turkey) mint, 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse bearded and draped bust of Asklepios right, serpent entwined staff before him; reverse TPIΠOΛEITΩN, winged Nemesis standing slightly left, head left, pulling out the neck of her long chiton with right hand, bridle in left hand hanging down at side; $195.00 (185.25)


Parium, Mysia, Mid 3rd century A.D.

|Parium|, |Parium,| |Mysia,| |Mid| |3rd| |century| |A.D.||AE| |22|
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. The last Attalid king, Attalus III died without issue and bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic in 133 B.C. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP98177. Bronze AE 22, BMC 83 var. (head left, obv. leg.), SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, BMC Mysia -, gVF, green patina, porous, earthen deposits, weight 4.806 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 90o, Parium (Kemer, Turkey) mint, c. mid 3rd century A.D.; obverse PARIOC CH (or similar) counterclockwise, youthful head of Parius (the mythical founder of the city) right; reverse Capricorn right, cornucopia above, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) counterclockwise below; extremely rare; $180.00 (171.00)


Chios, Islands Off Ionia, c. 435 - 425 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Chios,| |Islands| |Off| |Ionia,| |c.| |435| |-| |425| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
Chios was one of the first cities to strike coins, taking the sphinx as its symbol, a tradition maintained for almost 900 years. In 546 B.C. Chios became subject to the Persia. It was liberated by the Persia defeat at the Battle of Mycale in 479 B.C. When the Athenians formed the Delian League, Chios joined as one of the few members who did not have to pay tribute but instead supplied ships.
GA99683. Silver 1/3 stater, cf. SNG Cop 1545; Mavrogordato p. 61, 28; HGC 6 1126 (S), VF, surfaces lightly etched, weight 2.544 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chios mint, c. 435 - 425 B.C.; obverse sphinx seated left on ground line, curved wing, only one foreleg visible, bunch of grapes over Chian amphora before on left; reverse rough quadripartite incuse square, narrow bars, deep compartments; scarce; $180.00 (171.00)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darius II - Artaxerxes II, c. 420 - 375 B.C.

|Persian| |Lydia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Lydia,| |Anatolia,| |Darius| |II| |-| |Artaxerxes| |II,| |c.| |420| |-| |375| |B.C.||siglos|NEW
A number of markings in the reverse dies of sigloi of this same Carradice type and group are known. All are rare.
GA110037. Silver siglos, Carradice Type IV (middle) B; pl. XIII, 35; BMC Arabia p. 163, 110 ff., pl. XXVI, 10 ff., aVF, tight flan, porous, weight 5.222 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 420 - 350 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, dagger in right, bow in left, bearded, crowned, waist indicated, pellets on sleeves; reverse oblong incuse punch; lion head left within incuse; rare; $180.00 (171.00)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB99271. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 639; BMC Pontus p. 211, 9; Rec Gen I p. 226, 26; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, aVF, dark patina, spots of corrosion, reverse edge beveled, weight 5.240 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his animal skin cloak flying behind, monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; $160.00 (152.00)




  



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