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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Artemis or Diana||View Options:  |  |  |   

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2100.00 SALE |PRICE| $1890.00
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94920. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(2); HGC 9 1305; cf. BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 (SE 217, same controls); SNG Spaer 2863 (SE 219, different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-005), weight 16.501 g, maximum diameter 30.10 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 97 - 96 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, two monograms (controls) outer left, date CIS (Seleucid Era year 216) in exergue, ∆H monogram (control) in exergue on right, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $1000.00 SALE |PRICE| $900.00
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94921. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(3); Newell LSM 116a corr. (control ex. in error); Cohen DCA 303; HGC 9 1305; BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 var. (different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-004, in error has date yr. 218, 95/4 BC), weight 16.852 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 96 - 95 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, A over N (controls) outer left, date ΞIC (Seleucid Era year 217) in exergue, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $1000.00 SALE |PRICE| $900.00
 


Kingdom of Bithynia, Nikomedes I, c. 279 - 255 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Nikomedes| |I,| |c.| |279| |-| |255| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Nicomedes I was the first King of Bithynia to strike coins. He is primarily known for bringing the Gauls known as Galatians to the Asia Minor in 277 B.C. to fight against his brother and Antiochus I. This short-sighted mistake brought troubles for local Greeks for a century. About 264 B.C., according to Eusebius, he moved the capital to Nicomedia on the Propontis. Mørkholm describes the very similar portrait of Nikomedes on his tetradrachms as "the realistic portrait of an aged king with large and rugged facial features."
GB96095. Bronze AE 17, Rec Gen I-2 p. 219, 4, & pl. 29, 5; HGC 7 609 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; BMC Pontus -, F, scratches, corrosion, rough, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, c. 279 - 255 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the King right; reverse Warrior goddess Artemis-Bendis seated left on rock, two vertical spears in right hand, left hand resting on sword in sheath, circular shield on ground leaning on rock on near side, tree behind on far side of rock, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) downward on right, NIKOMH∆OY (Nikomedes) downward on left, EP monogram outer left; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck for Use in Roman Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Struck| |for| |Use| |in| |Roman| |Arabia||tridrachm|
This type was previously attributed to Caesarea, Cappadocia, but the Tell Kalak hoard and a lack of finds in Cappadocia indicate the type circulated in Arabia. Slightly more than two-thirds silver, the composition of this type is identical to contemporary Syrian tetradrachms. The weight indicates they are tridrachms, but there is no consensus as to the denomination. Sydenham and Kindler refer to them as tridrachms, McAlee as light tetradrachms, and Butcher as tetradrachms. The type has no iconographic link with Arabia and Arabian drachms are considerably more debased, typically at a 50:50 ratio of silver to bronze. RPC III notes they may have been struck in Rome for circulation in Arabia, or at least, the dies were made in Rome.
RS97644. Silver tridrachm, RPC III 4071 (23 spec.); Henseler 267; Sydenham Caesarea 190a; SNG ANS 1161 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 55, 74 (Caesarea), VF, superb "Roman" dies portrait, toned, flow lines, light bumps and scratches, reverse slightly off center, edge splits, weight 10.347 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra(?) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right, seen from slightly behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC (holder of Tribunitian power, consul), distyle temple, podium of four steps, cult image of Artemis of Perge within, eagle standing on pediment with head left and wings open; scarce; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00
 


Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 225 - 198 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |225| |-| |198| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.

Almost every example of this type known to Forum has the lion head countermark on the obverse.
CM97507. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 904 (same countermarks); BMC Thrace p. 195, 3; HGC 3.2 1495 (R1), aVF, dark patina with lighter blue highlighting, overstruck(?), weight 8.961 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, c. 225 - 199/8 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; countermark: lion's head facing with mane around in round punch; reverse ΛYΣIMA-XEΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing short chiton, quiver and bow over shoulder, holding long torch (two torches?) with both hands; countermark: head of grain in oval punch; from the Michael Arslan Collection; rare; $250.00 SALE |PRICE| $225.00
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||didrachm|
Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazama. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP97230. Silver didrachm, RPC III 3004 (25 spec.); Sydenham Caesarea 196; BMC Galatia p. 55, 69; SNG Fitzwilliam 5435; Metcalf Cappadocia 64c & Hoard 314 - 333, pl. 17 - 18, aVF, as found thick black toning, light scratches, tight flan, weight 5.970 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 210o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATO ς (consul 6 times), bust of Artemis left, in chiton, spear upward in right hand, phiale in left hand; ex Zeus Numismatics auction 11 (1 Aug 2020), lot 502; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Aezani, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Aezani,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Aizanoi, Latinized as Aezani, was an Ancient Greek city in western Anatolia. Located in what is now Cavdarhisar, Kutahya Province, its ruins are situated astride the River Penkalas, some 1,000 meters above sea level. The city was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, unusual combined thereat-stadium complex, and macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian. The city fell into decline in Late Antiquity. Later serving as a citadel, in 2012 the site was submitted for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage List.
RP93134. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phrygia p. 40, 125; Weber 706, SNG Hunterian I 2007, RPC Online IV T1684; SNG Cop 103 var. (obv. leg., crescent and star), aVF, crude style, die wear, minor encrustations, flan crack, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Aezani (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 184 - 192 A.D.; obverse AV KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate head right, no trace of drapery; reverse AIZANEITΩN, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing facing, with arm supports, kalathos on head, no flanking crescent and star; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB93762. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 177; SNGvA 8338; SNG Ashmolean 960; BMC Phrygia p. 76, 40; Weber 7026; HGC 7 672, aVF, brassy high points with toned recesses, tight flan, light marks, weight 6.409 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arm supports, AΠAME downward on right, AN∆PON / AΛKIO (Androni(kos), son of Alkion, [eglogistes]) in two downward lines on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |28|
Artemis is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture has a stag at her side, rather than a hound. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris.
RP94243. Bronze AE 28, Karwiese 1032(c); SNGvA 1922; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunter -; BMC Ionia -, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, light corrosion, weight 7.719 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K ΠO ΛIKIN BAΛEPIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΦECIΩN Γ NEOKOPΩN, Artemis advancing right, bow in left hand, with right hand drawing arrow from quiver, on shoulder, hound at feet behind running right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 




  



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