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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Apollo||View Options:  |  |  |   

Apollo

God of light, healing, music, poetry, prophecy, archery, and the arts. Symbols include the bow and the lyre. Artemis is his twin sister. Son of Zeus and Leto.

Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |II| |Theos,| |261| |-| |246| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as king.
GY99608. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber I 592, Newell ESM 196, HGC 9 268 (R2), VF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.964 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 250 - 246 B.C.; obverse helmeted and draped bust of Athena slightly left, wearing triple crested helmet; reverse Apollo seated right on omphalos, holding kithara on lap with right hand, tall tripod lebes behind on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, monograms (controls) outer left and outer right; ex CNG e-auction 513 (6 Apr 2022), lot 178; this coin is the only specimen of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Calpurnius| |Piso| |Frugi,| |90| |B.C.||denarius|NEW
Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was struck to support Rome in the Social War against the Marsic Confederation, the Marsi, Peligni, Piceni, Vestini, Samnites, Frentani, Marrucini, and Lucani. Despite making up over half the Roman army, the Italians had been denied Roman citizenship and denied a fair share of the booty and lands taken in Rome's conquests. In 91 B.C., they rebelled with an army of 100,000 battle-hardened soldiers, most Roman army veterans. In 90 B.C., Rome only just managed to stave off total defeat. After some Roman victories and citizenship concessions, the war was nearly over by 88 B.C. The type has numerous variations and control marks, indicating the enormity of the issue. The head of Apollo and the horseman refer to the Ludi Apollinares, games which were first held in 212 B.C. The following year, the praetor C. Calpurnius Piso, an ancestor of this moneyer, made the games a permanent annual event to honor of Apollo to maintain his support of the public health.
RR110663. Silver denarius, Sydenham, class IV, 671; RSC I Calpurnia 11a; BMCRR p. 255 type III, var. a (unlisted control letters); Crawford 340/1; SRCV 235, gVF, light toning, rev. slightly off center, mild die wear, weight 3.704 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, XVI ligature (mark of value) behind, E below chin; reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm frond, H above, L PISO FRVGI below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 291 (8 Nov 2022), lot 3292; $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00 ON RESERVE


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia

|Hierapolis|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia||AE| |19|
Hierapolis (Greek: "Holy City") was located on hot springs in Phrygia in southwestern Anatolia. Its ruins are adjacent to modern Pamukkale in Turkey and are designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The hot springs have been used as a spa since the 2nd century B.C., with many patrons retiring or dying there. The large necropolis is filled with sarcophagi.
RP110159. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2970; SNGvA 3647; SNG Cop 455; BMC Phrygia p. 247, 114, aVF, nice green patina, legends weak or unstruck, scratches, weight 5.527 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, grammateus M. Suillios Antiochos, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse KΛAY∆IOΣ KAIΣAΠ, λαυρεατε ηεαδ ριγητ; ρεϖερσε M ΣYIΛΛIOΣ ANTIOXOΣ ΓPA IEPAΠOΛITΩN, Apollo on horseback right, labrys (double axe) in left hand over left shoulder; scarce; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00 ON RESERVE


Mostene, Lydia, c. 69 - 120 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Mostene,| |Lydia,| |c.| |69| |-| |120| |A.D.||diassarion|
Mostene, in ancient Lydia, prospered in Roman and Byzantine eras. There is debate, based on a line in Tacitus, over whether Mostene was a Macedonian colony or a native Lydian city. In 17 A.D. the city was hit by an earthquake and was assisted by relief from Tiberius.
RP99972. Bronze diassarion, GRPC Lydia III 12; RPC Online II 994A (1 spec., type added post publication), Nice gVF. green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, light scratches, weight 3.563 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, Mostene (Kepecik, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 120 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, youthful draped bust of Senate right; reverse MOCTHNΩN KAICAPEΩN, Apollo-Mn (or hero) on horseback left, wearing chlamys, reins in left hand, labrys (double ax) in right hand over right shoulder; very rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Kings of Thrace, Adaios, c. 255 - 245 B.C.

|Kingdoms| |of| |Thrace|, |Kings| |of| |Thrace,| |Adaios,| |c.| |255| |-| |245| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Adaios probably served as a Seleukid strategos (military governor) of Thrace under the King Antiochos II Theos. Antiochos II took Thracian territory from Ptolemy II Philopator, c. 255 - 253 B.C., during the Second Syrian War. After Antiochos II and Ptolemy II made peace. Adaios continued to rule southern Thrace, making Kypsela his capital. Adaios was executed at Kypsela by Ptolemy III Euergetes after Ptolemy advanced into southern Thrace, c. 246 - 241 B.D., during the Third Syrian War.

This type was the largest of three bronze denominations Adaios issued. References list the lower monogram only as Σ, but on better specimens the AΣ monogram is clear.
GB110080. Bronze AE 22, SNG Tb 971; SNG Cop 1179; SNG BM 324; HGC 3.2 1763 (S); Peter p. 237; AMNG III-2 p. 147, 17 var. (monograms), VF, nice green patina, monograms and inscription not fully struck, weight 8.717 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 315o, Kypsela (near Ipsala, Turkey) mint, c. 255 - 245 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod lebes, HP over AΣ monograms downward on left, A∆AIOY downward on right; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |II| |Theos,| |261| |-| |246| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Before Alexander's conquest, Ecbatana was a summer residence for the Persian kings. Later it was a capital of the Parthian Empire.
GB110472. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber I 522(2); Newell WSM 1391; BMC Seleucid p. 15, 15; HGC 9 253, gVF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, attractive style, scratches, weight 3.733 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, with curly hair failing down neck; reverse tripod lebes, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, anchor flukes right below, Σ low outer left, ∆I low outer right; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, c. 270 - 250 B.C.

|Italy|, |Neapolis,| |Campania,| |Italy,| |c.| |270| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |21|NEW
Before it was refounded as Neapolis (meaning "new city"), Naples was called Parthenope, named for the siren Parthenope, the daughter of the river-god Achelous and the Muse Terpsichore. Parthenope cast herself into the sea and drowned when her songs failed to entice Odysseus. Her body washed ashore at Naples. When people from the city of Cumae settled there, they named their city Parthenope in her honor. Roman myth tells a different tale, in which a centaur called Vesuvius was enamored with Parthenope. In jealousy, Zeus turned the centaur into a volcano and Parthenope into the city of Naples. Thwarted in his desire, Vesuvius's anger is manifested in the mountain's frequent eruptions.
GI110559. Bronze AE 21, Potamikon 333, Taliercio IIIa.10, HN Italy 589; BMC Italy p. 115, 219, SNG Cop 505, Sambon 658, VF, irregular flan shape typical for the type with remnants of casting sprues, nice jade green patina, light corrosion, weight 5.763 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 135o, Campania mint, c. 270 - 250 B.C.; obverse NEOΠOΛITΩN, laureate head of Apollo left, long wavy hair, E behind; reverse river-god Acheloios Sebethos, as a man-faced bull, standing right, head turned facing, being crowned by Nike who flies right above, MB monogram below, possibly IΣ in exergue (off flan); $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |359| |-| |336| |B.C.||unit|
Philip II became the ruler of all Greece when he defeated the Athenians at the Battle of Chaeroneia in 338 B.C. Philip personally selected the design of his coins. His horse, on the reverse of this coin, won a race in the Olympic Games in 356 B.C., the year his son Alexander the Great was born.
GB110094. Bronze unit, SNG Alpha Bank 454, SNG ANS 850, SNG Cop 602, VF, broad flan, mild porosity, closed flan crack, obverse edge beveled, weight 5.566 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonian mint, c. 359 - 336 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male riding horse prancing to right, spearhead and part of shaft right below, all in a shallow round incuse; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 180 - 230 A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |180| |-| |230| |A.D.||AE| |27|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP110443. Bronze AE 27, RPC Online VIII U73261; SNG BnF 2182; SNG Tb 4506; SNG Delepierre 2173; Waddington 4011; BMC Pisidia 35 var. (no lyre); SNG Cop 320 var. (same), VF, dark patina, centered, light earthen deposits, some porosity/spots of corrosion, scratches, edge flaw obv. left, weight 11.820 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 0o, Termessus Major (Termessos National Park, Turkey) mint, 180 - 230 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN, draped bust of Hermes right, caduceus over left shoulder; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Apollo standing facing, head left, holding branch downward in left hand over small lyre on the ground at feet on right; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Germe ad Rhyndakos, Mysia

|Other| |Mysia|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.,| |Germe| |ad| |Rhyndakos,| |Mysia||AE| |22|
There were two towns named Germe: Germe ad Rhyndakos near Pergamum in Mysia and Germa ad Caicus in Lydia. BMC and SNG Cop include the city under Lydia, but recent scholarship indicates only Germe ad Rhyndakos in Mysia struck coins.
RP97866. Bronze AE 22, Ehling 35 - 46; BMC Lydia p. 82, 14; RPC Online II 926 (15 spec); SNG Righetti 710; SNG Lewis 1356; Lindgren III 460; SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina with some chipping, scratches, oval flan, weight 3.408 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Germe ad Rhyndakos mint, 24 Jun 79 - 13 Sep 81 A.D.; obverse AYTO T KAI CEBAC, laureate head right; reverse ΓEPMHNWN, Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, kithara (lyre) in left hand; scarce; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00




  



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