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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Hermes or Mercury||View Options:  |  |  | 

Hermes or Mercury

Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.

Korykos, Cilicia, c. 50 B.C. - 50 A.D.

|Cilicia|, |Korykos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |50| |B.C.| |-| |50| |A.D.||AE| |25|
Korykos (Corycus) was the port for Seleucia, an important harbor and commercial town. The Romans defeated the fleet of Antiochus the Great near Korykos, in 191 B.C. In Roman imperial times emperors usually kept a fleet there to watch over the pirates.

Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RB110022. Bronze AE 25, SNG Levante 803, SNGvA 5681, SNG BnF 1100, BMC Lycaonia -, SNG Cop -, attractive aF, nice green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, scattered light pitting, edge split, weight 8.505 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 225o, Korykos (Kizkalesi, Turkey) mint, c. 50 B.C. - 50 A.D.; obverse head of Aphrodite right, wearing diadem and stephane, KOPY downward on right, aphlaston lower right; reverse Hermes standing half-right, nude except for chlamys fastened around neck and winged sandals, caduceus in right hand, messenger bag (made from an udder) in extended left hand, AYTONO-MOY in two upward lines, starting on the left, the last three letters on the right ; $120.00 (121.20)


Kibyra Minor, Cilicia, 2nd-1st Century B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Kibyra| |Minor,| |Cilicia,| |2nd-1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Leake attributed this type to Kibyra in Phrygia and to the time of Claudius, but BMC Cilicia p. xxxiii notes they are earlier in style and in fabric resemble the coins of Cilician coastal towns. Head attributed them to Kibyra Minor, on the coast of Cilicia, near the Pamphylian border. The type was struck with either the numerals ∆K (24) or EK (25), which might be dates, but the era is uncertain.
GB110180. Brass AE 23, Imhoof-Blumer GM 462; SNG Levante 384 var. (EK); BMC Cilicia - (p. xxxiii); SNG BnF -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -, F, centered on a broad flan, dark green patina, porosity,, weight 8.172 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kibyra Minor mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Hermes standing half left, head left, kerykeion in right hand, ∆K (year 24?) downward lower left, KIBYPATΩN downward on right; first ever coin of Kibyra Minor handled by FORVM, Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; very rare; $120.00 (121.20)


Octavian, Imperator and Consul, 32 - 31 B.C.

|Octavian|, |Octavian,| |Imperator| |and| |Consul,| |32| |-| |31| |B.C.||denarius|
Mercury was the inventor of the lyre and the protector of commerce. This may refer to the restoration of commerce to Italy after the battle of Naulochus. -- Roman Silver Coins, Vol. I, The Republic to Augustus by H.A. Seaby

In 31 B.C., Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian was Roman Consul for the third time. His partner was Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, who replaced Mark Antony.
RS95264. Silver denarius, RIC I 257, RSC I Augustus 61, Hunter I 251, BMCRE I 596, SRCV I 1550, gVF, toned, banker's marks, some light scratches and marks, weight 3.708 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain Italian (Rome or Brundisium?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse bare head of Octavian right; reverse Mercury seated right on rock, playing lyre, petasos around neck, CAESAR - DIVI F divided across field; ex Forum (2016); ex Sincona AG, auction 10 (27 May 2013), lot 240; SOLD


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Mytilene,| |Lesbos,| |c.| |377| |-| |326| |B.C.||hekte|
Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH86215. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 86, - (-/η, unlisted obv. die); HGC 6 1012 (R1); BMC Troas p. 163, 71; SNG Cop 319; SNGvA 7738; Trait II 2190, VF, classical style, obverse die rust, reverse die wear, tight flan, weight 2.529 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 15o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse head of Athena facing slightly right, wearing triple crested Attic helmet, earring, and necklace; reverse draped bust of Hermes right, petasos on string hanging behind his neck, all within a linear square, all in square incuse but not visible because the die was larger than the flan; rare; SOLD


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Geto-Dacian,| |Roman| |Republic| |Imitative,| |c.| |82| |B.C.| |-| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||denarius| |serratus|
In ancient Greek and Roman writing Dacus (plural Daci) and Geta (plural Getae) were interchangeable names for tribes of the Dacia region, distinct from but influenced by and possibly related the Thracians and Celts. Modern historians prefer to use the name Geto-Dacians.
CE68430. Silver denarius serratus, cf. Davis C52 and M166; for the Rome mint, C. Mamilius Limetanus, 82 B.C., prototype see: SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, gVF, weight 3.846 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 135o, tribal mint, c. 82 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses (Odysseus) walking right, greeted by his dog Argos, staff in left hand, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD







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