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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Demeter or Ceres||View Options:  |  |  | 

Demeter or Ceres

The known mythology of Demeter and Ceres is identical. Demeter's (Ceres') virgin daughter Persephone (Proserpina) was abducted by Hades (Pluto) to be his wife in the underworld. Demeter searched for her endlessly, lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Demeter searched, preoccupied with her loss and her grief, the seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus (Jupiter) sent his messenger Hermes (Mercury) to the underworld to bring Persephone back. However, because Persephone had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. It was decreed that she must spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Demeter grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Persephone's return brings the spring.

Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, c. 350 - 275 B.C.

|Italy|, |Metapontion,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |350| |-| |275| |B.C.||AE| |14|NEW
The unusual blue encrustation on this coin is "Egyptian Blue," calcium copper silicate, a reaction of the copper with sand, lime, and natron. In crushed form, it was one of the earliest Egyptian pigments.
GI95303. Bronze AE 14, Johnston Bronze 31; HN Italy 1666; HGC I 1136 (R2); SNG Munchen 1027; SNG Evans 229; Weber 804; BMC Italy p. , 177; Winterthur 391, VF/aF, fine style, encrustations, scratches, marks, corrosion, weight 2.043 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 270o, Metapontion (Metaponto, Italy) mint, c. 350 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain; reverse barley kernel, M-E divided high across field, ant on left, AΓ monogram right; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius||denarius|
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
RS94549. Silver denarius, RIC III AP362, BMCRE IV AP421, RSC II 104, Hunter II 35, SRCV II 4584, VF, well centered, radiating flow lines, scattered porosity, flan edge a little ragged with small splits/cracks, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and banded, drawn up at back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled head left, grounded long torch in right hand, raising drapery at waist with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $103.00
 


Uncertain City (Panormos?), Sicily, Roman Rule, c. 211 - 190 B.C.

|Roman| |Italy| |&| |Sicily|, |Uncertain| |City| |(Panormos?),| |Sicily,| |Roman| |Rule,| |c.| |211| |-| |190| |B.C.||triens|
In 254 B.C. Panormus was captured by the Romans. It retained its municipal freedom, and remained for many years one of the principal cities of Sicily. It continued to issue bronze coins, bearing the names of various resident magistrates, and following the Roman system. Under Augustus, Panormus received a Roman colony.
GI89312. Bronze triens, Semuncial standard; Calciati I p. 365, 205 (Panormos); SNG Munchen 835 (Panormos); HGC 2 1691 (R1, uncertain Romano-Sicilian); SNG Cop -, aVF, off center but types on flan, a little rough, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain Romano-Sicilian mint, c. 211 - 190 B.C.; obverse veiled and draped bust of Demeter-Ceres left, small cornucopia behind neck; reverse double cornucopia, overflowing with bunches of grapes, tied with fillets, four pellets (mark of value) in a vertical line to left; rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Perinthos,| |Thrace||AE| |20|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92875. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, small edge splits, porosity, weight 5.147 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius||denarius|
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS94554. Silver denarius, RIC III AP358, RSC II 93, BMCRE IV AP389, SRCV II 4581, gF, nice portrait, light marks, die wear, edge cracks/splits, weight 3.171 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing slightly right, long scepter vertical behind in right, two heads of grain in left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Kentoripai, Sicily, c. 211 - 190 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |Kentoripai,| |Sicily,| |c.| |211| |-| |190| |B.C.||hexas|
Kentoripai was an iron age Sikel town that maintained its culture and language long after much of Sicily had become Hellenized. In 414 B.C., the town allied with Athens to help defeat a Syracusan inland expedition. In 396, Kentoripai made a treaty with Syracuse. In 344, Timoleon defeated Nikodemos, the ruler of Kentoripai and annexed the city and its territory. Kentoripai was one of the first cities in Sicily to make a treaty with Rome. The city was rewarded for its loyalty and under Roman protection it became one of the most important cities in Roman Sicily.
GI93441. Bronze hexas, Calciati III p. 175, 7; BMC Sicily p. 56, 13; SNG ANS 1323; SNG Cop 216; SNG Munchen 517; HGC 2 637 (R1), aVF, well centered on a broad flan, green patina with red copper areas, porous, small edge cracks, weight 4.435 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kentoripai mint, c. 211 - 190 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Demeter right, wreathed in grain, wearing earring and necklace, stalk of grain behind; reverse plow right, bird on the share, two pellets left, KENTO/PIΠINΩN in two lines, starting above, ending below, linear border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Petelia, Bruttium, Italy, c. 216 - 204 B.C., Time of Hannibal

|Italy|, |Petelia,| |Bruttium,| |Italy,| |c.| |216| |-| |204| |B.C.,| |Time| |of| |Hannibal||AE| |21|
"In 216, when most of South Italy joined Hannibal after Cannae, Petelia remained faithful to Rome and sought the dispatch of a Roman garrison. The Senate, however, felt it self unable to lend aid to so distant and ally; the town was besieged and after eleven months fell to the Carthaginians, who handed it over to the Bretti. After the defeat of Hannibal a substantial contingent of refugees who had escaped to Rome were restored to Petelia in recognition of their loyalty to Rome." -- N.K. Rutter, Historia Numorum Italy
GB88309. Bronze AE 21, BMC Italy p. 372, 8 (also Λ); HN Italy 2454; SNG ANS 602 var. (control); SNG Cop 1908 var. (same); SNG Munchen 1551 - 1552 var. (same), F, uneven strike with weak areas, olive green and red patina, areas of corrosion, weight 7.431 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 90o, Petelia mint, under Hannibal, c. 216 - 204 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wearing veil and wreath of barley; reverse ΠETHΛINΩN (clockwise on left), Zeus in fighting stance left, head right, nude, hurling thunderbolt with right hand, transverse long scepter in left hand, star with five rays around a central pellet left, Λ (control letter) lower right; ex Rudnik Numismatics; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius||denarius|
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
RS94561. Silver denarius, RIC III AP362, BMCRE IV AP421, RSC II 104, Hunter II 35, SRCV II 4584, F, porous, scratches and marks, reverse off center, edge cracks, weight 2.961 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and banded, drawn up at back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled, head left, grounded long torch in right hand, raising drapery at waist with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Tripolis, Lydia

|Other| |Lydia|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Tripolis,| |Lydia||AE| |26|
Tripolis ad Maeandrum (through the ages known as Neapolis, Apollonia, and Antoninopolis) was on the northern bank of the Maeander between Sardes and Laodicea ad Lycum. Its Roman and Byzantine ruins still exist near Yenicekent, Turkey.
MA92873. Bronze AE 26, GRPC Lydia IV Tripolis 168; RPC Online VIII - (unassigned, ID 20622, this coin 1 of 6 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 133, 75; Waddington 2691; SNG Leypold 1343, F, well centered, porous/pitted, weight 9.818 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (near Yenicekent, Turkey) mint, 1st issue as caesar, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOC K, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse TPIΠOΛEITΩN, Demeter standing half left, head left, wearing long chiton and peplos, stalks of grain and poppy in right hand, flaming long torch in left hand; ex Savoca auction blue 11 (27 Oct 2018), lot 1220; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Elaia, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Elaia,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |15|
Elaea or Elaia was an ancient city of Aeolis, the port of Pergamum. The site is not precisely determined but is somewhere near the modern town of Zeytindag, Izmir Province, Turkey. According to Strabo, from Livy (xxxv. 13), travelers who would reach Pergamum from the sea, would land at Elaea. One of the passages of Livy shows that there was a small hill near Elaea, and that the town was on a plain and walled. Elaea was damaged by an earthquake in the reign of Trajan.
GB89013. Bronze AE 15, BMC Troas p. 127, 20; SNGvA 7685; SNG Cop 181; SNG Munchen 395; SGCV II 4206, F, dark patina, scratches, porosity, earthen deposits, weight 3.725 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wearing grain wreath; reverse lit torch, EΛ−AI/T−ΩN in two divided lines, all within grain wreath; ex Gerhard Rohde; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40
 







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