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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Hera or Juno||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hera or Juno

Queen of the Gods, and the goddess of marriage and motherhood. Symbols are the peacock and the cow. Daughter of Kronus and Rhea. Wife and sister of Zeus.


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

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In ancient Greek and Roman writing Dacus (plural Daci) and Geta (plural Getae) were interchangeable names for tribes of the Dacia region, distinct from but influenced by and possibly related the Thracians and Celts. Modern historians prefer to use the name Geto-Dacians.
CE93052. Silver imitative denarius, Davis website -, Davis Apvlvm -, Davis-Paunov -, et al. -; for the Rome mint prototypes see: Crawford 363/1 (obv.) and Crawford 379/2 (rev.), VF, crude, light toning, die wear/rust, a little off center and uneven strike with some weak areas, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right (various possible prototypes, perhaps copied from Roman Republic, L. Marcius Censorinus, 82 B.C., silver denarius, Crawford 363/1) ; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue (copied from Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., 80 B.C., silver denarius serratus, Crawford 379/2); apparently unpublished, we were unable to find another example of this hybrid imitative type; extremely rare; $240.00 (211.20)


The Perrhaiboi, Thessaly, Greece, 4th Century B.C.

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The Perrhaiboi were a Pelasgian (indigenous non-Greek) tribal people who lived in Perrhaibia, north of Thessaly proper and bordering Macedonia. Their capital was Phalanna, and their most significant town was Olosson. In the Iliad, Homer wrote of "the valiant Perrhaiboi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresios, which sends its waters into the Peneus." The Perrhaiboi fought in the Battle of Thermopylae. Through most of their history they were overshadowed and controlled by Thessaly, although they had two votes at the Delphic Amphictyony. Philip II of Macedon took their kingdom and it remained under Macedonian control until the Roman conquest in 196 B.C.
GB92798. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1244, BCD Thessaly II 558, Rogers 439, Trait IV 582, SNG Cop 196, HGC 4 156 (S), BMC Thessaly -, gVF/VF, smoothing, weight 6.392 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 255o, Olosson (Elassona, Greece) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse veiled head of Hera facing slightly left, wearing necklace; reverse Zeus standing left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, star ΠEPPAI/BΩ-N (downward in two lines, the first on the right, the second divided on the left); ex BCD Collection with his round tag noting, "found near Phalanna, Dec. 1996, SFr. 110.-"; $180.00 (158.40)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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On 11 March 222, Elagabalus was assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard. Their mutilated bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome before being thrown into the Tiber. Severus Alexander succeeded Elagabalus. He was only 13 years old, his mother, Julia Avita Mamaea, governed the Roman Empire with the help of Domitius Ulpianus and a council of 16 senators.
RS91439. Silver denarius, RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, Hunter III 1, SRCV II 8212, VF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.527 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right; reverse IVNO CONSERVATRIX (Juno the protectress), Juno standing half left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock right at feet on left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $144.00 (126.72)


Livia and Julia, Pergamon, Mysia, c. 10 - 2 B.C.

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Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia. Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius. During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
RP89139. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2359; SNG Cop 467; BMC Mysia p. 139, 248; AMC I 1229; McClean 7718; SNG Paris -; SNGvA -, aVF, closed flan crack, earthen encrustation, weight 4.195 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, grammateus Charinos, c. 10 - 3 B.C.; obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia (as Hera) right; reverse IOVΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia (as Aphrodite) right; $130.00 (114.40)


Crispina, Augusta, 178 - 182 A.D., Wife of Commodus

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon, the protector and special counselor of the Roman state, and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She was a daughter of Saturn, the sister and wife of Jupiter, and the mother of Juventas, Mars, and Vulcan. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock. Her Greek equivalent is Hera.
RS92469. Silver denarius, RIC III 283, RSC II 21, BMCRE IV 41, Hunter II 10, SRCV II 6001, VF, old collection toning, flow lines, minor flaw reverse left field, flan ragged with edge splits, weight 2.244 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO, Juno standing facing, veiled, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter in left hand, peacock left at feet on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $110.00 (96.80)


The Perrhaiboi, Thessaly, Greece, c. Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.

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The Perrhaiboi were a Pelasgian (indigenous non-Greek) tribal people who lived in Perrhaibia, north of Thessaly proper and bordering Macedonia. Their capital was Phalanna, and their most significant town was Olosson. In the Iliad, Homer wrote of "the valiant Perrhaiboi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresios, which sends its waters into the Peneus." The Perrhaiboi fought in the Battle of Thermopylae. Through most of their history they were overshadowed and controlled by Thessaly, although they had two votes at the Delphic Amphictyony. Philip II of Macedon took their kingdom and it remained under Macedonian control until the Roman conquest in 196 B.C.
GB76999. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1247 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 561; Rogers 440, fig. 239; SNG Cop 197, HGC 4 157, aVF, well centered, some corrosion, weight 6.372 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Olosson or Phalanna mint, c. late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right, wearing oak wreath; reverse ΠEPPAI/BΩN (in two lines, starting upward from lower left, ending downward on right), Hera seated right on backless throne, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, resting left hand on knee, no magistrate name or initials; $105.00 (92.40)


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 450 - 387 B.C.

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Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid, in the latter as the island where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls. The island was important throughout classical antiquity despite its small size due to its strategic location at the entrance of the Dardanelles. In the following centuries, the island came under the control of a succession of regional powers, including the Persian Empire, the Delian League, Alexander the Great, the Kingdom of Pergamon, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Republic of Venice. As a result of the War of Chioggia (1381) between Genoa and Venice the entire population was evacuated and the town was demolished. The Ottoman Empire established control over the deserted island in 1455. During Ottoman rule, it was resettled by both Greeks and Turks. In 1807, the island was temporarily invaded by the Russians. During this invasion, the town was burnt down and many Turkish residents left the island.Map of Troas
GS91378. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 508; SNGvA 7665; BMC Troas p. 92, 9; SNG Mnchen -; HGC 6 -, aF, toned, tight flan, weight 1.622 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 180o, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 387 B.C.; obverse archaic janiform head, female on left, male on right (Hera and Zeus?); reverse labrys (double axe), T-E/N-E in two lines divided by ax handle, all within a shallow incuse square; scarce; $90.00 (79.20)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RB89955. Billon follis, Hunter V 27 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Ticinum 45a, Cohen VI 101, SRCV IV 12772, Choice VF, full legends, nice portrait, flow lines, light marks, weight 10.940 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 45o, 3rd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 304 - 305 A.D.; obverse IMP C DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR (the sacred money of our two emperors and two princes), Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star right, TT in exergue; $80.00 (70.40)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RS88029. Silver denarius, RIC IV S560; RSC III 97; BMCRE p. 162, 42; cf. SRCV II 6589 (Laodicea); Hunter III -, VF, toned, tight flan cutting off much of legends, weight 3.082 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock at feet on left; $70.00 (61.60)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 280 - 260 B.C.

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Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GB85883. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1102; Nemea 1644 - 1646, BMC Peloponnesus p. 144, 106; SNG Cop 57; HGC 5 697 (S), VF, green patina, rough corrosion, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Argos mint, c. 280 - 260 B.C.; obverse head of Hera right, wearing polos inscribed APΓE; reverse Palladion statuette of Athena advancing left, helmeted and draped, shield on raised left arm, hurling javelin with right hand; ex J. Cohen Collection; scarce; $55.00 (48.40)




  



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Hera or Juno