Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome to Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome to Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! To Order By Phone Or Call With Questions Call 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Zeus or Jupiter||View Options:  |  |  |   

Zeus or Jupiter

King of the Gods and ruler of Mount Olympus; god of the sky, and thunder. Youngest son of the Titans Kronus and Rhea. Symbols are the lightning bolt and the eagle.

Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY95974. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber I 177; Newell ESM 314; BMC Seleucid p. 3, 33 - 34; HGC 9 18c (R1-R2), aVF, high relief head of Zeus, old cabinet toning, flow lines, porosity, light marks, minor edge flaw on reverse, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, c. 295 - 280 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse Athena driving biga of horned elephants, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, spearhead (control) above right, A(or E or M over Ω?, obscure, control) lower right before elephants; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $1600.00 (€1472.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
SH95962. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1782(2)c; BMC Seleucid p. 52, 11 var. (outer left monogram); SNG Spaer 1424 var. (same); Newell SMA 142 (same); HGC 9 875a, gVF, fine Hellenistic style, old cabinet toning, edge split, weak area at neck/date, old scratches, weight 16.327 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 149 - 148 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander Balas right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY in two downward lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY in two downward lines on the left, Zeus seated left on high back throne, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, Victory in extended right hand offering wreath, lotus topped scepter in left hand, Θ outer left, PA monogram inner left, date ∆ΞP (Seleucid Era year 164) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $450.00 (€414.00)
 


Eastern Celts, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Dachreiter" Type, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Eastern| |Celts,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |"Dachreiter"| |Type,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Although the body and head of the horseman on the prototype drachm of Philip III of Macedonia have been replaced by an S-shaped line over three pellets, the horseman's leg can still be found on the side of the horse!
SH89462. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA tf. 15, 170/4; Lanz 448, aVF, light toning, reverse slightly off center, light marks, weight 11.953 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse stylized horseman prancing left, rider's head and body reduced to an S-shaped line over three pellets, leg of horseman on side of the horse; $400.00 (€368.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt, Ancient Counterfeit

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||tetradrachm|
In 1933, J.G. Milne wrote, "There are scarcely any counterfeits or forgeries of Alexandrian coins in existence, other than those made in modern times." This coin is, however, an ancient counterfeit, a die match to two specimens in William Metcalf 's "A Hoard of Forgeries from Luxor" in Revue Belge de Numismatique CXXII (1976), pp. 65 - 77, pls. 1 - 2 (Available Online). Metcalf records a hoard of ancient Alexandrian forgeries in the American Numismatic Society collection, acquired at Luxor in March 1908, by the E.T. Newell. The 76 pieces in the ANS not be the entire hoard, since Newell was in the habit of disposing of duplicate or damaged specimens. The coins are of acceptable weight and struck, not cast, and copied coins struck 41 - 161 A.D. The hoard was clearly as intended, a hoard of counterfeits only, likely the forger's own stock. There are two specimens from the same dies in the ANS. Our coin may have been part of this original hoard or it may be a coin that the forger had already put into circulation.
RX93591. Billon tetradrachm, Metcalf Forgeries p. 72, obv: IX / rev: 17 & obv: pl. 1, 11 / rev: pl. 2, 13 (for prototype see Dattari 256, struck 67/68 A.D.), VF, very close to official style, light marks, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 11.725 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, criminal mint, c. 161 - 165 A.D.; obverse NEPO KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AY, radiate bust of Nero left, wearing aegis, L I∆ (year 14) before; reverse ∆IOΣ OΛYMΠIOY, laureate bust of Zeus Olympios right, no star; ex Naville Numismatics auction 51 (21 Jul 2019), lot 241 (not identified as counterfeit); $400.00 (€368.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS97274. Silver drachm, Houghton-Lorber II 131.10b, Newell ESM 103, HGC 9 32a (R1), SNG Spaer -, aVF, centered on a tight flan, light toning, light marks, weight 3.612 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 180o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (Baghdad, Iraq) II mint, c. 296/5 - 281 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Athena driving quadriga of horned elephants right, helmeted, brandishing spear in right hand, oval shield on left arm, anchor (Seleukid symbol) above right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, Θ (control letter) behind Athena, pentalpha (control symbol) above elephants; ex Savoca Numismatik silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 152; rare; $260.00 (€239.20) ON RESERVE


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus V Eupator, 164 - 162 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |V| |Eupator,| |164| |-| |162| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Antiochus V was just nine years old when crowned. The kingdom was ruled by his regent Lysias. In 163 or early 162 B.C., the Roman legate Gnaeus Octavius enforced the Treaty of Apamea by burning the Seleukid fleet and killing the army's war elephants (private citizens assassinated him for this outrage). Soon after, Ptolemaeus, the satrap of Commagene, declared independence. Only two years after becoming king, his uncle Demetrius escaped captivity, claimed the throne and had Antiochos V and his regent executed.
SH95968. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1575(1); Newell SMA 74; SNG Spaer 1243; Houghton CSE 136; BMC Seleucid p. 44, 3; HGC 9 752, VF, toned, excellent portrait, light marks, edge chip, areas of slightest corrosion, weight 15.537 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 164 - 162 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos V right, diadem ends fall straight behind, fillet border; reverse Zeus seated left, himation around hips and legs and over left arm, Victory in extended right hand crowning name, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, EYΠATOPOΣ (of a good father) in exergue, ∆I monogram outer left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $220.00 (€202.40)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Mallos, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Mallos,| |Cilicia||AE| |38|
There were no specimens on Coin Archives, or the many websites we searched. We know of only one other specimen of this type, an ex FORVM coin, RP23043, 21.344g, but only 32.3 mm diameter. SNG Levante 1283 and 1284 were struck with the same obverse die, but the reverse depicts the city goddess Tyche seated on rocks over a river god swimming below.
RP92558. Bronze AE 38, Apparently unpublished; BMC Lycaonia -, SNG Levante -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, Ziegler -, Lindgren -, RPC Online -, et al., aF, green patina, earthen deposits, porosity, spots of corrosion, legends mostly weak or worn, small edge splits, weight 21.520 g, maximum diameter 37.5 mm, die axis 180o, Mallos mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC MAPK OΠEΛ CEYHP MAKPEINON CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, countermark behind: S C in a round punch; reverse MAΛ IEP ΠOΛ ΘEOY AMΦIΛOCOY (Mallos holy city of god Amphilokos), Zeus seated half left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; huge 37.5 mm bronze!, from the Errett Bishop Collection; extremely rare; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Akmonia, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Akmonia,| |Phrygia||AE| |25|
Akmonia (Acmonea) was an important city of central Phrygia, located on a tributary of the river Senaros. Akmon was the founder of Akmonia, the first king of the region, and the father of Mygdon. His son Mygdon led a force of Phrygians against the Amazons, alongside Otreus (another Phrygian leader) and King Priam of Troy, one generation before the Trojan War. Priam mentions this to Helen of Troy in Book 3 of The Iliad.
RP92643. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online VI T5584 (8 spec.), Waddington 5514, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mün -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Leypold -, SNG Hunt -, BMC Phrygia -, Lindgren -, aVF, choice obverse, green patina, light earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center with full legend on flan, weight 7449 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, Akmonia (Ahat Koyu, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AKMONEΩN (NE ligate), Zeus seated left on throne without back, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection, zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY97097. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463(3)j; Newell SMA 449; SNG Spaer 2808; BMC Seleucid p. 100, 4; HGC 9 1319, VF, toned, typical tight flan, obverse a little off center, light marks, weight 15.515 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88/7 - 83/75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY in two lines downward on right EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Φ over A outer left (control, off flan), monogram below throne, (frozen control) below throne, Σ (control) in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (16 Aug 2020), lot 2121 (part of); $190.00 (€174.80)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY97098. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463(3)j; Newell SMA 449; SNG Spaer 2808; BMC Seleucid p. 100, 4; HGC 9 1319, VF, tight flan typical for the type, light marks, weight 15.378 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88/7 - 83/75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY in two lines downward on right EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Φ over A outer left (control, off flan), monogram below throne, (frozen control) below throne, Σ (control) in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (16 Aug 2020), lot 2121 (part of); $190.00 (€174.80)
 




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
Page created in 0.984 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity