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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Zeus or Jupiter||View Options:  |  |  |   

Zeus or Jupiter

King of the Gods and ruler of Mount Olympus; god of the sky, and thunder. Youngest son of the Titans Kronus and Rhea. Symbols are the lightning bolt and the eagle.

Macedonian Kingdom, Nikokreon, King of Salamis, Cyprus, c. 331 - 310 B.C., Alexander the Great Lifetime Issue

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Nikokreon,| |King| |of| |Salamis,| |Cyprus,| |c.| |331| |-| |310| |B.C.,| |Alexander| |the| |Great| |Lifetime| |Issue||obol|NEW
Struck in the name of Alexander the Great, by Nikokreon, King of Salamis. Nikokreon succeeded his father, Pnytagoras, who had submitted to Alexander and personally participated in the siege of Tyre. Nikokreon visited Alexander at Tyre where he distinguished himself by furnishing magnificence theatrical exhibitions for the Emperor. After Alexander's death Nikokreon allied with Ptolemy against Antigonus and was rewarded by being placed in control of all Cyprus. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most coins struck in the name of Alexander were issued after his death.
GS110001. Silver obol, apparently unpublished, cf. Price 3141 (hemidrachm), VF, toned, reverse off center, reverse die wear, scattered porosity, light etching, weight 0.625 g, maximum diameter 9.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Salamis mint, Alexander lifetime issue, c. 331 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated to left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot forward (lifetime style), eagle right in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, strung bow left (control symbol) in left field, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Roma e-auction 98 (16 Jun 2022), lot 173; ex inventory of a UK dealer; this is the only specimen of this obol type known to FORVM; extremely rare; $350.00 (332.50) ON RESERVE


Paphos, Cyprus, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Cyprus|, |Paphos,| |Cyprus,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.||1/12| |stater|NEW
Archaeology shows that Old Paphos has been inhabited since the Neolithic period. It was a center for Aphrodite's cult. Aphrodite's mythical birthplace was on the island. The founding myth is interwoven with the goddess such that Old Paphos became the most famous and important place for worshiping Aphrodite in the ancient world. According to the biblical Acts of the Apostles, after landing at Salamis and proclaiming the Word of God in the synagogues, the prophets and teachers, Barnabas and Saul of Tarsus, traveled along the entire southern coast of the island of Cyprus until they reached Paphos. There, Sergius Paulus, the Roman proconsul, was converted after Saul rebuked the Sorcerer Elymas. In Paphos, Acts first identifies Saul as Paul.
GS110036. Silver 1/12 stater, Tziambazis Suppl. 27, otherwise unpublished, aVF, well centered, dark toning, scratches, weight 0.903 g, maximum diameter 9.4 mm, Paphos mint, uncertain king, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse male head (Zeus?) right; reverse rough incuse square; ex Roma e-auction (16 Jun 2022), lot 473; ex private UK collection; Coin Archives records only this coin and two other specimens of this type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $350.00 (332.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |II| |Philadelphos,| |285| |-| |246| |B.C.||diobol|
Ptolemy II requested copies of Jewish texts for the Library at Alexandria. They were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars hired for the purpose, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible. Many of the oldest Biblical verses in the Dead Sea Scrolls, particularly those in Aramaic, correspond more closely with the Septuagint than with the Hebrew text.
GP99631. Bronze diobol, Lorber CPE 242 (4 spec.), Svoronos 466 (1 spec.), Picard-Faucher 286, Malter 74 (=Svoronos 466a), SNG Cop -, Weiser -, Noeske -, VF, scratches, light corrosion, strike a little weak on highest points, beveled obverse edge, central depressions, weight 21.236 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 265 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, ME monogram between eagle's legs, Θ below tail; ex CNG e-auction 511 (9 Mar 2022), lot 185; very rare; $340.00 (323.00)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Apollonia Salbace, Caria

|Other| |Caria|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Apollonia| |Salbace,| |Caria||AE| |30|
This coin is an obverse die match to a coin struck by the neighboring city, Alabanda, Caria, SNG Mnchen 464, RPC Online VI T5384. Dies shared by more than one city in the region were first discovered by Konrad Kraft in 1972. Groups of smaller cities in Anatolia shared traveling mints, which would sometimes use the same obverse dies for more than one city.
RP92646. Bronze AE 30, Apparently unpublished; RPC Online -, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Caria -, F, porous, turquoise and earthen adhesions, reverse flatly struck, weight 11.787 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Salbace (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEY AΛEΞAN∆PO-C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTPA AΓAΘEINOY TOY IH AΠOΛΛΩNIATΩN (strategos Agathinos, son of Hie.(?), Apollonia), Zeus standing slightly left, head left, wearing himation and chlamys, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; extremely rare, this is the only specimen of the type known to FORVM; $250.00 (237.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Struck shortly after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. Kolophon also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but undoubtedly the Alexander named on this coin was the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. The ruins of Kolophon are south of the town Degirmendere Fev in the Menderes district of Izmir Province, Turkey.
GS98704. Silver drachm, Price 1750, Mller Alexander 313, HGC 3.1 944c, SNG Cop -, aVF, bumps and scratches, tight flan, weight 4.164 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, barley grain kernel left, spear head upright right, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Pars Coins; $225.00 (213.75)


Antioch, Roman Provincial Syria, Fall 48 - Spring 47 B.C., Cleopatra Countermark

|Roman| |Syria|, |Antioch,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Syria,| |Fall| |48| |-| |Spring| |47| |B.C.,| |Cleopatra| |Countermark||AE| |24|NEW
From McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch, p. 74, note 25: "The coins of this year (Pompeian Era 19 = 48/7 BC) and of Year 3 of the Caesarean Era are frequently seen with a countermark on the obverse, which was previously described as "head of Apollo r." in an oval. As discussed in the text, it now seems likely that the countermark portrays Cleopatra, and was used to mark coins circulating in the Syro-Phoenician territories, which were given to her by Mark Antony."
RP110050. Bronze AE 24, McAlee 43; RPC I 4216; BMC Galatia p. 155, 35; Cohen DCA 384; HGC 9 1366; SNG Cop -; countermark: McAlee p. 74, note 25, VF/F, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 12.383 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, fall 48 - spring 47 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; countermark: bust of Cleopatra right in an incuse oval; reverse ANTIOXEΩN THΣ MHTPOΠOΛEΩΣ, Zeus Nicephorus enthroned left, chest bare, himation around hips and legs, Nike offering wreath in his extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, fulmen (thunderbolt) above, cornucopia (control symbol) inner left, IΘ (Pompeian Era year 19) below, all within laurel wreath; $150.00 (142.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |III| |Euergetes,| |246| |-| |222| |B.C.||diobol|
This XP monogram was later used for Christ.

Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response, he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch, and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9. The Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power during his reign.
GP99077. Bronze diobol, Lorber CPE B397, Svoronos 966 (25 spec.); SNG Cop 176; Weiser 73; BMC Alexandria p. 55 89; Noeske 123; Hosking -, Choice F, well centered, central dimples, weight 21.502 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho monogram between eagle's legs; from a Las Vegas dealer; $140.00 (133.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy IX - Ptolemy XII, 99 - 58 B.C.

|Cyprus|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |IX| |-| |Ptolemy| |XII,| |99| |-| |58| |B.C.||dichalkon|
The Paphos II finds were excavated at the House of Dionysos in Paphos.
GB95763. Bronze dichalkon, Paphos II 383 - 385, otherwise unpublished, F, dark green patina with earthen highlighting, scratches, porosity, edge cracks, beveled obverse edge, sprue remnants, weight 2.044 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, 88 - 58 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned bust of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), single cornucopia bound with fillet; ; rare; $110.00 (104.50)


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mn. Mn had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPCL 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $110.00 (104.50)


Rhodos, Carian Islands, 188 - 84 B.C.

|Rhodos|, |Rhodos,| |Carian| |Islands,| |188| |-| |84| |B.C.||AE| |15|
In 190 B.C. a fleet from Rhodes defeated the Seleucid fleet under command of the fugitive Carthaginian general Hannibal. Rhodes was rewarded with territory and enhanced status, but clearly Rome now ruled the world and autonomy was dependent upon good relations. Those good graces evaporated in the wake of the Third Macedonian War. Rhodes had remained scrupulously neutral, but some Senators felt she had been too friendly with the defeated King Perseus. Some even proposed declaring war. In 164, Rhodes became a permanent ally of Rome, ending an independence that no longer had meaning. It was said that the Romans ultimately turned against the Rhodians because the islanders were the only people they had encountered who were more arrogant than themselves.
GB99139. Bronze AE 15, SNG Cop 797; BMC Caria p. 250, 225; SNG Keckman 725 ff. var. (various controls in lower fields); HGC 6 1475 (S), VF, green patina, light earthen deposits, small edge chips, weight 1.950 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, 188 - 84 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse rose superimposed on solar disk with top of disk and rays rising above, bud on each side, P-O flanking in lower fields, no visible controls; scarce; $110.00 (104.50)




  



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