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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military| ▸ |Legionary||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Roman Legions

Legionarii is the name give to the foot soldiers of the Roman legions. The horsemen were distinguished by the appellation of Equites. The term of sixteen years was the period fixed for the service of the Legionarii. Before the reign of Septimius Severus they were not permitted to marry, or at least to have their wives with them in the camp. The military discipline of these troops was very severe. They led a life of great hardship, and made long marches, laden with heavy burdens. During peace they were employed in working on the fortifications of towns and of camps, as well as in repairing the high roads.

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.||denarius|
Augustus built the temple of Mars the Avenger on the Capitol to house the recovered legionary eagles, which had been lost by Crassus and Antony to the Parthians.
RR34983. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1623, RIC I 105a, BMCRE I 373, BMCRR Rome 4419-4420, BnF I 1202, RSC I 190, EF, beautiful coin, glossy even gray tone, weight 3.800 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 18 B.C.; obverse CAESARI AVGVSTO, laureate head right; reverse Temple of Mars Ultor (Mars the Avenger), domed round hexastyle shrine with acroteria, set on podium of three steps, containing aquila between two signa militaria, MAR - VLT divided across the field; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI - Ferrata, the "Ironclad"

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |LEG| |VI| |-| |Ferrata,| |the| |"Ironclad"||denarius|
The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad," was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus issued a 'restitution' of the type, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns.
SH76382. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/19, Sydenham 1223, BMCRR II East 197, RSC I 33, Sear CRI 356, Choice EF, near perfect centering, light toning, slightly uneven strike, contact marks, areas of porosity and light corrosion, weight 3.664 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III •VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Forum (2005); SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.||denarius|
This type refers to the Parthian surrender to Augustus of the standards which they had taken from Crassus and his slaughtered legions. Augustus took an ovation for this success, entering the city on horseback. He was also honored with a triumphal arch. The clipeus virtutis, Latin for "shield of bravery" was awarded to Augustus by the Senate and people of Rome in 27 B.C. for his "courage, clemency, justice and piety" and displayed in the Curia Iulia.
SH43351. Silver denarius, RIC I 86a, BMCRE I 417, RSC I 265, BnF I 1132, Hunter I 164, SRCV I 1633, EF, weight 3.731 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 19 B.C.; obverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right; reverse shield inscribed CL V (Clypeus Virtutis) between an aquila left and legionary standard right, S - P / Q - R (Senatus Populusque Romanus) in two divided lines around, SIGNIS / RECEPTIS (standards recovered) in two lines above and below; scarce; SOLD







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