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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Trojan War||View Options:  |  |  | 

The Trojan War on Ancient Coin
Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Ilion (Troy), Troas

|Troas|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Ilion| |(Troy),| |Troas||AE| |24|
In Greek and Roman mythology, Hector was a Trojan prince and the greatest warrior for Troy in the Trojan War. He acted as leader of the Trojans and their allies in the defense of Troy, killing countless Greek warriors. He was ultimately killed by Achilles.

Did Hector really live? The most valuable historical evidence for the Battle of Troy are treaties and letters mentioned in Hittite cuneiform texts of the same approximate era, which identify an unruly Western Anatolian warlord named Piyama-Radu (possibly Priam) and his successor Alaksandu (possibly Alexander, the nickname of Paris) both based in Wilusa (possibly Ilios), as well as the god Apaliunas (possibly Apollo). The name E-ko-to (along with 20 other names from the myth) is known from Linear B tablets, not referring to the hero, but proving that this name existed in Greek in Mycenaean times.
RP97548. Brass AE 24, cf. Bellinger Troy T192; SNG München XIX 254; SNG Cop 405, BMC Troas -, F, rough, parts of legends illegible, central dimple (as usual for the type) on reverse, weight 8.121 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ilion (Troy), Troas mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse AV K M (or Λ?) AY - KOMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right; reverse E-KTOP, Hector of Troy galloping biga right, head turned back left, wearing helmet and military dress, transverse spear in right hand, shield and reins in left hand, IΛIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare, Coin Archives records only one sale of this type in the past two decades (also listed are a few specimens of the similar and also very rare AE36 and AE19 Hector reverse types struck for Commodus at Ilion); $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00
 


Tyndaris, Sicily, c. 380 - 254 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |Tyndaris,| |Sicily,| |c.| |380| |-| |254| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Tyndaris, 36 miles from Messana (modern Messina), was founded by Dionysios of Syracuse in 396 B.C., on land taken from Abakainon, peopled with Messenian exiles, and named for Tyndaris, the mythical king of Sparta and father of Castor. In Greek mythology, the Dioscuri, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux, were sons of the Spartan Queen Leda. Tyndareus was the father of Castor, thus a mortal, while Zeus was the father of Pollux, thus a demigod. Helen of Troy was the daughter of Leda and Zeus, thus the sister of the Dioscuri.
GI95231. Bronze AE 23, Calciati p. 79, 1/1; BMC Sicily p. 235, 1; Weber 1753; SNG Cop 948; HGC 2 1632 (R2); SNG ANS -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -; SNG Lloyd -, gVF, dark brown tone, cleaning scratches, smoothing, weight 8.876 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 45o, Tyndaris mint, c. 380 - 254 B.C.; obverse TYN∆APIΣ, head of Helen of Troy left; wearing stephane and earring, star of eight rays and central pellet behind; reverse Castor on horseback cantering right, wearing cap and chlamys, palm frond in left hand and over left shoulder, reins in right hand; ex Forum (2018); very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, C. Mamilius C.f. Limetanus, 82 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |C.| |Mamilius| |C.f.| |Limetanus,| |82| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|
This type alludes to the moneyer's claim of descent from Telegonus, son of Ulysses and Circe, and hence from Mercury -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
SH21139. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, RSC I Mamilia 6, toned gVF, weight 3.661 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses walking right, staff in left hand, right extended toward his dog, Argus, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD







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