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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Happiness||View Options:  |  |  | 

Happiness (Felicitas)

Happiness, cheerfulness and joy (or gaiety) are personified on Roman coins by Felicitas, Hilaritas and Laetitia. Coins with these subjects celebrated the brighter side of life, or in harder times explained that the Empire was moving toward a happier future.

Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS111590. Silver denarius, RIC IV 150, RSC III 282, BMCRE V 168, Hunter 39, SRCV II 7551, Choice aEF, well centered, frosty surfaces, some letters unstruck (filled dies?), edge splits, weight 2.674 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 219 - 220 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Felicitas standing half left, long caduceus before her in her right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 124 (8 Jan 2023), lot 986 (part of); $140.00 (128.80)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

|Geta|, |Geta,| |209| |-| |c.| |26| |December| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
In 205, Hadrian's Wall was restored, after heavy raids by Caledonian tribes had overrun much of northern Britain.
RS112513. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8; RSC III 36; BMCRE V p. 197, 218; Hunter III 5; SRCV II -, VF, flow lines, scratches, obv. off center, small edge cracks/splits, weight 2.200 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 200 - 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA CAES PONT, older boy's bare-headed draped bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVGG (the good fortune of the two emperors), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $120.00 (110.40)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Mamaea|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS112940. Silver denarius, RIC IV 335, RSC III 17, BMCRE VI 483, Hunter III 3, SRCV II 8209, Choice VF, full border centering, nice portrait, toned, weight 3.161 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 228 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in horizontal ridges, with looped plait at the back of neck; reverse FELICITAS PVBLICA (to the good fortune / happiness of the public), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, legs crossed, caduceus in right hand, left elbow on column; $110.00 (101.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB110108. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2255, BMCRE III 1497, Cohen II 620, SRCV II 3595, Strack II 663, Hunter II 517 var. (slight drapery), aF, porosity/light corrosion, weight 24.130 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, olive branch in right hand, long caduceus in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Anciennes Collections (Clermont Ferrand, France); $80.00 (73.60)


Trajan Decius, September 249 - June or July 251 A.D.

|Trajan| |Decius|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |September| |249| |-| |June| |or| |July| |251| |A.D.||double| |sestertius|
Rare denomination introduced with this issue, and equal in value to the obsolete silver quinarius. The c. 4g brass "semis" introduced at the same time as this issue, may well have been a "reduced as" half of the c. 8.5 gram dupondius, one quarter of the c. 17 g sesterius, and one eighth of this coin. Completing the sub-antoninianus denominations, a rare, small, silver coin of c. 1.6 g was a denarius. The double sestertius, easilly distiguished by its radiate crown, was also issued by Gallienus and especially Postumus. A rare denomination of Aurelian and Severina is sometimes referred to as a "dupondius," sometimes as an "double sestertius." its rarity precludes its use as a smaller than half fraction of the c. 275 A.D. aurelianus. Probably the 7 g "as" was a half of the aurelianus, making the 14 g radiate Aurelian / Severina bronze an attempted bronze aurelianus.
SH26392. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC IV 115d, Cohen V 39, Hunter III 47, SRCV III 9395, Choice VF, weight 34.518 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, drapery in left shoulder; reverse FELICITAS SAECVLI S C, Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; exceptional quality for this late issue, olive patina; ex The New York Sale, Auction XIV, 10 January 2007, lot 373; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.||sestertius|
In 114, Trajan defeated the Parthians and overran Armenia and northern Mesopotamia. The kingdom of Osroene became a vassal kingdom of the Roman Empire.
SH53311. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 499v, RIC II 671, BnF IV 840, BMCRE III 1015, Strack I 451, Cohen II 351, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, gVF, flat reverse strike, weight 24.484 g, maximum diameter 34.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late summer - fall 114 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS S C, Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Frederick S. Knobloch Collection of Roman Imperial Coins, Stacks Auction, May 1980; SOLD


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
SH33438. Silver denarius, RIC IV 60; RSC III 15b; BMCRE V 62; Hunter III 26; SRCV II 7332 var. (short beard), EF, weight 3.399 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 2nd emission, 217 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FELICITAS TEMPORVM (happy times), Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; fabulous short-beard portrait, excellent centering, mint luster; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
SH21201. Silver denarius, Hunter III 4 (same dies), RIC IV 4 var., RSC III 15 var., BMCRE V 91 var., SRCV II 6141 var. (all var. Rome mint, SEPT vice SEP), aVF, exceptionally large flan for the type with full legend on both obverse and reverse, frosty surfaces, weight 2.684 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEP (sic) AL-BIN CAES, bare head right; reverse FELICITAS COS II, Felicitas standing half left, caduceus in right hand, scepter in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Aelius, Caesar, July or August 136 - 1 January 138 A.D.

|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
SH26653. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2634, RSC II 50, BMCRE III Hadrian 969, SRCV II 3973, Strack II 391, Hunter II 2, VF, excellent portrait, nicely toned, light marks, reverse slightly off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.072 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in left hand, cornucopia in right hand; SOLD


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS75697. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 75A (R); RSC IV 130, SRCV III 8945, Hunter III -, EF, superb strike with sharp dies, nice metal, weight 4.966 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for four years, consul, father of the country), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Barry Murphy (Oct 2007); SOLD







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