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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Denominations| ▸ |Late Roman Silver||View Options:  |  |  |   

Late Roman Silver
Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
Colonia Augusta Treverorum was the capital of Roman Belgica and served as the capital of the Gallic Empire under the emperors Tetricus I and II from 271 to 274. Dates of operation: 294 - 395, 408 - 413 and c. 430. mint marks: SMTR, TR, TRE, TROB, TRPS.
SH34997. Billon argenteus, RIC VI Treveri 825 (R3), Cohen 99 (3 Fr.), Choice gVF, weight 2.306 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 125o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 310 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LICI-NIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, mappa in right, spear over shoulder in left; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVG (to Jupiter the protector of the emperor), Licinius borne aloft by eagle right, wings spread, head left, emperor holds scepter in left and thunderbolt in right, PTR in exergue; near perfect centering, some softness as is typical on this series, good metal; very rare; SOLD


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |siliqua|
Constans began his reign in an energetic fashion. In 341 - 342, he led a successful campaign against the Franks, and in the early months of 343 he visited Britain. The source for this visit, Julius Firmicus Maternus, does not provide a reason, but the quick movement and the danger involved in crossing the channel in the dangerous winter months suggests it was in response to a military emergency, possibly to repel the Picts and Scots.
RS28057. Silver siliqua, RIC VIII Trier 164 (R), RSC 161a, SRCV V 18504, Choice about Mint State, weight 3.603 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 1st group, 342 - 343 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONS-TANS P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE D N AVG (victories of our lord emperor), two Victories standing facing each other, holding wreath inscribed VOT / V / MVLT / X, TR in exergue; rare; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, |siliqua|
In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RS79818. Silver siliqua, RIC VIII Antioch 35 (R2), RSC V 338A, SRCV V 17925, Hunter V -, Cohen VII -, EF, well centered, toned, nice surfaces with a few light marks, weight 3.152 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch mint, c. 340 - 342 A.D.; obverse pearl-diademed head right, with eyes raised to heaven, no legend; reverse VOTIS / XV / MVLTIS / XX in four lines within laurel wreath with jewel at the top, tied at the bottom, ANT in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
The Sisak Hoard of more than 2000 silver argentei, most of them mint-state, plus silver vessels, was found in 1953 near Siscia (Croatia). Still today, nearly all the high grade early argentei of the early tetrarchy on the market came from this hoard. The deposition of the hoard can be placed in the year 295/296.
SH53596. Silver argenteus, Sisak Hoard 31, RIC VI 17b, RSC V 208C, FDC, weight 3.007 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, c. 295 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIAN-VS CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA SARMAT, the four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod in front of turreted enclosure with gate; ex H. S. Perlin Co., 1988; magnificent rainbow iridescent toning on blazing lustrous fields, perfect centering on a large flan, sharp portrait of fine style, from the 1953 Sisak hoard; rare (RIC R3); SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
The Sisak Hoard of more than 2000 silver argentei, most of them mint-state, plus silver vessels, was found in 1953 near Siscia (Croatia). Still today, nearly all the high grade early argentei of the early tetrarchy on the market came from this hoard. The deposition of the hoard can be placed in the year 295/296.
SH53598. Silver argenteus, Sisak Hoard 41c, RIC VI Siscia 19a, RSC V 488e, Superb EF, weight 2.969 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 295 A.D.; obverse DIOCLETI-ANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VICTORI-A SARMAT, the four princes sacrificing over tripod before archway of six-turreted enclosure; ex H. S. Perlin Co., 1988; sharp high-relief masterpiece portrait, exceptional strike, beautiful rainbow iridescent toning, from the 1953 Sisak hoard; SOLD


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
The Sisak Hoard of more than 2000 silver argentei, most of them mint-state, plus silver vessels, was found in 1953 near Siscia (Croatia). Still today, nearly all the high grade early argentei of the early tetrarchy on the market came from this hoard. The deposition of the hoard can be placed in the year 295/296.
SH53585. Silver argenteus, Sisak Hoard 2, RIC VI 32b, RSC V 625f, Superb EF, weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four princes sacrificing over tripod before the gate of an eight-turreted enclosure; ex H. S. Perlin Co., 1988; small flan crack, fabulous rainbow iridescent toning, near perfect centering, from the 1953 Sisak hoard; SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
The Sarmatians were a large confederation of Iranian people during classical antiquity, flourishing from about the 5th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. They spoke Scythian, an Indo-European language from the Eastern Iranian family. The Sarmatians moved to an area called Sarmatia; east of Germania and north of the immediate vicinity of the Danube. These barbarous and little know tribes also occupied the vast tracts of modern Russia. In the autumn of 285, in the Balkans, Diocletian encountered a tribe of Sarmatians who demanded assistance. The Sarmatians requested he either help them recover their lost lands or grant them pasturage rights within the empire. Diocletian refused and fought a battle with them, but was unable to secure a complete victory. The Sarmatians would have to be fought again. In 288, Diocletian managed what was probably another rapid campaign against the resurgent Sarmatians. No details survive, but surviving inscriptions indicate that Diocletian took the title Sarmaticus Maximus after 289.
SH21639. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Roma 19a, RSC V 488e, cf. SRCV IV 12612 (Trier, Rome noted), Hunter V -, superb EF, lustrous, excellent centering and strike, weight 3.312 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 294 A.D.; obverse DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA SARMAT (victory over the Sarmatians), the four princes sacrificing over tripod before archway of six-turreted enclosure; SOLD


Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

|Constantius| |I|, |Constantius| |I,| |May| |305| |-| |25| |July| |306| |A.D.|, |argenteus|
SH34978. Silver argenteus, RIC VI 42a, RSC V 314a, Cohen VII 314 (12 Fr.), Choice EF, weight 3.545 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, as caesar, 295 - 297 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four tetrarchs sacrificing in front of six-turreted enclosure (city or castrum), A in exergue; full circles strike, fine style portrait, mint luster, die damaged below bust, ex Glenn Woods; scarce; SOLD


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.|, |siliqua|
All the references list this type with the reverse legend ending CAES, but our coin's reverse legend ends CAESAR. RIC lists only officina Z and Θ. Most of the officina number is off flan, but our coin does not appear to be either. There is possibly a pellet at the beginning of the mintmark, a possibility is not in the references. We are uncertain if the this is a variation of the referenced types or if the references are in error. We could not locate even one plate or online photo of another specimen of this type to compare. There are three auctions of this type on recorded on Coin Archives, but all of them are for this exact same coin.
SH89742. Silver siliqua, RIC VII Constantinople 127 var. (CAES), RSC V 72 var. (same), SRCV V 17087 var. (same), Hunter V -, gVF, attractive youthful portrait with eyes to God, toned, light marks, weight 2.622 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, 9th Officina(?), Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 336 A.D.; obverse Constantine diademed right, looking up to God, no inscription; reverse CONSTANTINVS CAESAR, Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, CONS[...] in exergue; ex Heritage auction 271848 (2 Dec 2018), lot 36228; ex CNG sale 84 (5 May 2010), lot 1531; ex CNG Triton XIII (5 Jan 2010), lot 1523; ex White Mountain Collection; extremely rare; SOLD


Theodosius II, 10 January 402 - 28 July 450 A.D.

|Theodosius| |II|, |Theodosius| |II,| |10| |January| |402| |-| |28| |July| |450| |A.D.|, |light| |miliarense|
SH08479. Silver light miliarense, RIC X Theodosius II 378, gVF+, weight 4.11 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 408 - c. 420 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, head left; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), emperor standing fascing, nimbate head left, raising right hand, globe in left hand, star left, CON (Constantinople) in exergue; toned, light corrosion; very rare (R4); SOLD




  




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