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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Travels of Saint Paul||View Options:  |  |  | 

Travels of Saint Paul

St. Paul's various journeys, occurring from about 35 A.D. to around 67 A.D., took him through a wide array of cities in regions of Syria and Asia Minor. During these journeys his life was affected by major political figures such as Aretas IV, King of the Nabataeans (9 B.C. - 40 A.D.) (2 Cor 11:32); Roman Emperors like Nero (54 - 68 A.D.) (Acts 26:32); the Roman Procurators Antonius Felix (52 - 60 A.D.) (Acts 24:24) and Porcius Festus (59 - 62 A.D) (Acts 24:27) the Herodian rulers Agrippa I (37 - 44 A.D.) and Agrippa II (55 - 95 A.D.) (Acts 25:13); and pagan deities such as Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus (Acts 19:28). See the bottom of this page for a chart of the cities Paul visited. Click on Travels of Paul to see a map and read an article about Paul's journeys.

Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D., with Licinius II Caesar

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.,| |with| |Licinius| |II| |Caesar||follis|
 
SH35421. Billon follis, Bastien, NC 1973, pp. 87 - 97, VF, weight 3.590 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 330o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 317 or 318 A.D.; obverse DD NN IOVII LICINII INVICT AVG ET CAES (Domini Nostri Iovii Licinii Invicti Augustus et Caesar), confronted busts of Licinius I and II, holding trophy of arms between them; reverse I O M ET VIRTVTI DD NN AVG ET CAES (Iovi Optimo Maximo Virtuti Domini Nostri Augustus et Caesar), Jupiter standing facing to the right of trophy of captured arms with two bound captives at base, Jupiter nude except for cloak over shoulder and holds long scepter in left hand, SMATS in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Tarsos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |164| |-| |27| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GB93605. Bronze AE 21, SNG Levante 940; SNG BnF 1321 - 22; SNG Cop 333 var. ff. (different controls); BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 95 var. ff. (same), VF, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, bumps, porosity, weight 6.871 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse Sandan cult image standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, two monograms over filleted club on left, TAPΣEΩN downward on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT97952. Billon follis, Hunter V 87 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Thessalonica 60, SRCV V 15251, gVF, great detail, areas of weak strike, porous, flan crack, weight 3.857 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 210o, 3rd officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN (to Jove the protector of our two Emperors), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, •TS•Γ• in exergue; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Tyre, Phoenicia, 111 - 110 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

|Phoenicia|, |Tyre,| |Phoenicia,| |111| |-| |110| |B.C.,| |Judas'| |30| |Pieces| |of| |Silver||shekel|
Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SL86641. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 237, 85; Cohen DCA 919-18 (C); Baramki AUB -, NGC Ch AU*, strike 5/5, surface 5/5 (4280576-003), weight 14.20 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, 109 - 108 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date HI (year 18) over club and palm frond left, ZB right, Phoenician letter beth between legs; NGC| Lookup; SOLD


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, King Strato I (Adb'ashtart I), c. 365 - 352 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Sidon,| |Phoenicia,| |King| |Strato| |I| |(Adb'ashtart| |I),| |c.| |365| |-| |352| |B.C.||double| |shekel|
SH48909. Silver double shekel, Elayi 2004 1345-8; cf. Betlyon 21 & 35; cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 145, 29, gVF, weight 25.428 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 352 B.C.; obverse armed galley with oars, advancing left, standard in stern, small figure as figurehead on bow, Phoenician regnal date year 14 (IIII-) above; reverse King of Persia with charioteer in a biga left, horses waking, Sidonian king walks behind in Asian garb carrying a cultic scepter and votive vase, Phoenician letters BA (90) above; typical weak strike, nicely centered on a full flan, lightly toned, ex Goldberg Auction 55, lot 77, 29 Oct 2009; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |359| |-| |336| |B.C.||stater|
Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.
SH33201. Gold stater, Le Rider pl. 82, 265, VF, weight 8.588 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 45o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, 340/336 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, charioteer in biga right, ΛO below horses; SOLD


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Claudius|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||cistophorus|
This issue celebrated their marriage and Agrippina Junior's elevation to Augusta. Julia Agrippina was a great-granddaughter of Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of Tiberius, sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius, and mother of the Nero. She is described by the ancient sources as ruthless, ambitious, violent and domineering, but also beautiful and reputable. According to Pliny the Elder, she had a double right upper canine, a sign of good fortune. Many ancient historians accused Agrippina of poisoning Claudius. A soothsayer prophesied if Nero became emperor, he would kill his mother, Agrippina replied "Let him kill me, only let him rule!" Nero had her executed in 59 A.D.
SH79841. Silver cistophorus, RPC I 2223, RIC I 117 (R), BMCRE I 234, BnF II 294, RSC II 2, SRCV I 1887, VF, excellent portraits, toned, nice surfaces, highest points flatly struck, reverse slightly off-center, weight 11.054 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, 50 - 51 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P X IMP XIIX (counterclockwise), laureate head of Claudius right; reverse AGRIPPINA AVGVSTA CAESARIS AVG (counterclockwise), draped bust of Agrippina Jr. right, hair in queue at back, hair in three rows of curls above ear and long curly strand below ear; rare; SOLD


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|
Maximinus II was made Caesar in 305. After Galerius died, Maximinus II invaded and annexed Galerius' former territory. In 313, he invaded Licinius' territory. Although he seized many cities his army was destroyed in a battle. He fled disguised as a slave but fell ill and died.
SH04235. Billon follis, RIC VI Antiochia 145b, EF, weight 6.04 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 310 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm decorated with two riders and four figures; reverse SOLI INVICTO (to the invincible sun god), Sol holding globe in right and raising left, riding in a facing quadriga, two horses split in each direction, S in center, ANT in exergue; from the Aiello Collection, Alex G. Malloy auction LX listed this coin with an estimate of $2,500 (unsold); very rare (R3); SOLD


Syracuse, Sicily, c. 405 B.C., Signed by Kimon

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |c.| |405| |B.C.,| |Signed| |by| |Kimon||hemilitron|
The finest style by one of the greatest masters of numismatic art. The famous master-engravers who signed their work in gold and silver also signed some bronze coins. This is the first example with a clear KIM signature that we have seen.
SH17090. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II 45, 19 fr 1; HGC 2 1479; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; SNG Munchen -; BMC Sicily -, EF, attractive green patina, weight 3.666 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 225o, Syracuse mint, c. 415 - 405 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Arethusa left, hair bound with ampyx and sphendone, signature KIM in lower right field; reverse wheel of four spokes, ΣY−PA in upper quarters divided by spoke, dolphin head down and inward in each of the lower quarters; SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
SH35846. Silver denarius, Unpublished; cf. RIC IV 72 aureus from Num. Chron., 1908, pp. 90 ff. (R5); RSC -, VF, weight 4.724 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse [IMP CA]ES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, laureate head right; reverse ROMAE AETER (eternal Rome)NA-E, Roma seated left, cornucopia in right, left rests on a rudder on globe; unique?; SOLD







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Road to Damascus

1st Missionary Journey

2nd Missionary Journey

3rd Missionary Journey

Journey to Rome

 Jerusalem
 Damascus
 Nabataean Kingdom
 Damascus
 Jerusalem
 Lydda
 Joppa
 Caesarea
 Tarsus
 Antioch (Syria)

 

 

 

 

 

 Antioch (Syria)
 Seleucia Pieria
 Salamis
 Paphos
 Perge
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Iconium
 Lystra
 Derbe
 Attalia
 Antioch (Syria)

 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)
 Trasus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Dorylaeum
 Alexandria Troas
 Neapolis
 Philippi
 Amphipolis
 Apollonia
 Thessalonica
 Beroea
 Athens
 Corinth
 Cenchreae
 Ephesus
 Caesarea
 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)

 Antioch (Syria)
 Tarsus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Ephesus
 Alexandria Troas
 Philippi
 Thessalonica
 Corinth
 Philippi
 Assos
 Miletos
 Patara
 Tyre
 Ptolemais
 Caesarea
 Joppa
 Jerusalem

 Jerusalem
 Caesarea
 Sidon
 Myra
 Malta
 Syracuse
 Rhegium
 Puteoli
 Rome


Italics means there is no evidence that coins were minted in that city.


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