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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Flowers||View Options:  |  |  | 

Flowers on Ancient Coins

Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 205 - 190 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great

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Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece and the principal town of the island is also named Rhodes. The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011. It is located northeast of Crete, southeast of Athens and just off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Rhodes' nickname is The island of the Knights, named after the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, who once conquered it. Historically, Rhodes is famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, a giant bronze statue once standing at the harbor. It was completed in 280 B.C. and destroyed in an earthquake in 224 B.C. No trace of the statue remains today. Historical sites on the island of Rhodes include the Acropolis of Lindos, the Acropolis of Rhodes with the Temple of Pythian Apollo and an ancient theater and stadium, ancient Ialysos, ancient Kamiros, the Governor's Palace, Rhodes Old Town (walled medieval city), the Palace of the Grand Masters, Kahal Shalom Synagogue in the Jewish Quarter, the Archeological Museum, the ruins of the castle of Monolithos, the castle of Kritinia, St. Catherine Hospice and Rhodes Footbridge.
GS87644. Silver tetradrachm, HGC 6 1455 (S); cf. Price 2520 ff. (various magistrates), Mller Alexander 1162 ff. (same), VF/F, well centered, choice obverse, reverse rough with burnished area, scratches and marks, slight double strike, weight 15.795 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 205 - c. 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left on throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, magistrate's name under arm and over rose left, PO (Rhodos) under throne; scarce; $340.00 SALE |PRICE| $306.00


Persian Empire, Mazaeus, Satrap of Cilicia , c. 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsus, Cilicia

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Artaxerxes III Ochus of Persia was the eleventh emperor of the Achaemenid Empire ruling from 358 to 338 B.C. and, after defeating Nectanebo II in 343 B.C., ruled as the first Pharaoh of the 31st dynasty of Egypt. His reign coincided with the reign of Philip II in Macedonia. Artaxerxes III was poisoned by the ambitious eunuch and chiliarch Bagoas. Bagoas also murdered most of Artaxerxes III's sons but put his youngest son, Arses, on the throne as a puppet emperor. This type was probably struck for Arses succession as Artaxerxes IV. Two years later Arses unsuccessfully attempted to poison Bagoas. Bagoas then poisoned Arses along with most of his family, and put Arses' cousin Darius III on the throne. To legitimize the conquests of Alexander the Great, Macedonian propaganda would accuse Darius III of playing a key role in the murder of Arses, who was thus identified as the last legitimate king of the Achaemenid royal house.
SH89697. Silver obol, Gktrk 35 (Myriandros), SNG BnF 429 (Myriandros), Newell Myriandros 16 4, Trait II 740, SNG Levante -, gVF, darker spots, some porosity, tight flan, weight 0.672 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 338 - 336 B.C.; obverse Persian king (Artaxerxes III?) in the guise of Baaltars, seated right on throne with back terminating in a griffin's head, with long beard, wearing tall pointed Pharaonic crown, lotus flower in right hand, lotus-tipped sceptre in left hand; reverse youthful male head (Artaxerxes IV?) left, beardless, with curly hair, wearing earring and a tall pointed Pharaonic crown; ex Beast Coins; rare; $280.00 (246.40) ON RESERVE


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Glass Floral Inlay Fragment, 3rd - 1st Century B.C.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years. Ex Robert Haas collection.
AA32380. Floral inlay glass fragment, cf. National Museums Scotland 492 - 493, 1.9 cm (3/4"), partial flower with three white pedals and center of yellow and clear dots, black background; rare; $270.00 SALE |PRICE| $243.00


Lampsacus, Mysia, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Recent hoard and coin finds prompted Ashton to reattribute this type to the Troad, probably Lampsakos (Ashton Memnon, NC 162 (2002), pp. 11-15). Ashton suggests ME refers to Memnon of Rhodes, that these coins were struck at Lampsakos when he controlled the city and similar coins inscribed EY and NI possibly refer to Memnon's subordinates. Memnon of Rhodes was a prominent Greek commander in the service of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Related by marriage to the Persian aristocracy, he served the Persian king for most of his life. Memnon was arguably the toughest defender to challenge Alexander and was nearly successful in putting a halt to his advance.
GB86134. Bronze chalkous, Ashton Memnon 2 (A1/P2); Ashton Solar p. 30, 1; BMC Caria p. 221, 4; SNG Cop (Caria) 914; Waddington 2813; Trait II 1733, VF, green patina, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of light corrosion, weight 0.708 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsacus (near Lapseki, Turkey) mint, under Memnon of Rhodes, c. 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse radiate youthful head of Helios right; reverse rose in profile, M-E flanking low across field; very rare; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Rhodos, Caria, c. 229 - 205 B.C.

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Zeus is not a normal type for Rhodes but is the normal obverse for Ptolemaic Egypt. This coin honors Ptolemy III of Egypt for providing earthquake relief. In 229 B.C., a devastating earthquake knocked down the Colossus of Rhodes and destroyed the city. Ptolemy III promised the Rhodians 300 talents of silver, a million artabae of corn, ship-timber for 10 quinqueremes and 10 triremes, 1000 talents of bronze coinage, 180,000 pounds of tow (for ropes), 3000 pieces of sailcloth, 3000 talents (of copper?) for the repair of the Colossus, 100 master-builders with 350 workmen, and 14 talents yearly to pay their wages, plus 12,000 artabae of corn for their public games and sacrifices, and another 20,000 artabae for victualling 10 triremes. The greater part of these goods were delivered at once, as well as one-third of the money.
GB88083. Bronze tetrachalkon, Ashton NC 1986 33 (A15/P30), Ashton 234, SNG Cop 795, HGC 6 1469 (R1), SNG Keckman -, VF, dark green patina with red earthen highlighting, well centered on a compact flan, bumps and marks, corrosion, minor edge flaking, weight 5.904 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 229 - 205 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse rose, tendrils left and bud right, TE left, P - O flanking stem; rare; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

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Laodicea on the Lycus was on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana, now near the modern city of Denizli, Turkey. It was home to one of the Seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelation. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. Its ruins attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled. Laodicea
GB91507. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phrygia p. 284, 29; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Lindgren -, aVF, dark patina rubbed to bare bronze on highest points, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.437 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycum (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane, hair in a bun at the back; reverse Aphrodite standing slightly left, head left, draped in long chiton dove in extended right hand, rose on stem in lower left field, ΛAO∆IKEΩN downward on right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Rhodos, Caria, c. 40 B.C. - 25 A.D.

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Helios is the god and personification of the Sun in Greek mythology. He is the son of the Titan Hyperion and the Titaness Theia (according to Hesiod), also known as Euryphaessa (in Homeric Hymn 31) and brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn. Helios was described as a handsome young man crowned with the shining aureole of the Sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night. In the Homeric Hymn to Helios, Helios is said to drive a golden chariot drawn by steeds (HH 31.1415); and Pindar speaks of Helios's "fire-darting steeds" (Olympian Ode 7.71). Still later, the horses were given fire related names: Pyrois, Aeos, Aethon, and Phlegon. The equivalent of Helios in Roman mythology was Sol.
GB87753. Bronze AE 19, SNG Keckman 751; SNG Mnchen 673; SNG Cop 875; BMC Caria p. 263, 359; Weber III 6758; HGC 6 1470 (S), F, green patina, edge crack, weight 3.894 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 40 B.C. - 25 A.D.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse PO∆IWN, full blown open rose with four pedals, seen from above, term; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Paphos, Cyprus, Timocharis or Nicolcles, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

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Destrooper-Georgiades speculates, that the type of the rose may mark a change of reign in the royal house of Paphos or a monetary reform. She also notes, they are often corroded and their study presents many difficulties of classification and dating because, like most bronzes struck in Cyprus at that time they are anepigraphic or bear only one syllabic character whose meaning is not always obvious and because none was found in a dated stratigraphic layer, not even the 12 or so found in the systematic excavations of Kourion and of Paphos.
GB88980. Bronze AE 14, cf. Zapiti-Michaelidou 22; Destrooper-Georgiades Nouvelles 13; Tzambazis 92; BMC Cyprus p. 45; 49, gF, crowded flan, corrosion, weight 2.193 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Paphos mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite left, wearing ornamented stephanos; reverse rose, tendril left; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Rhodos, Caria, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Rhodes was an important slave-trading center, best known for The Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The giant statue of Helios was finished in 280 B.C., but destroyed by an earthquake later in that century. It inspired later sculptures including the Statue of Liberty.
GB88996. Bronze AE 11, cf. SNG Keckman 384 ff.; BMC Caria p. 238, 74 ff.; HGC 6 1479 (various control symbols), F, dark patina, tight flan, light deposits, light corrosion, tiny edge split, weight 1.534 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Rhodos right, hair rolled, wearing stephane, earring, and necklace; reverse rose with bud to right, PO left (normally flanking), uncertain control symbol; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00







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Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
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Flowers