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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Justice & Equity||View Options:  |  |  | 

Justice and Equity (Justitia, Aequitas and Dikaiosyne)

In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also a personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). She is depicted with a cornucopia and a balance suggesting Aequitas Augusti is a source of prosperity. Dikaiosyne is the Greek equivalent personification of justice and fair dealing.

Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS112930. Silver denarius, RIC II 13, RSC II 6, BnF III 13, BMCRE III 24, Hunter I 9, SRCV II -, VF, centered on a tight flan, mild roughness, weight 3.397 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse AEQVITAS AVGVST (fairness of the emperor), Aequitas standing half left, head left, wearing stephane, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|NEW
Dikaiosyne is the Greek personification of justice and fair dealing. One of the most common reverse types of Alexandria, she always holds scales and cornucopia.
RX112105. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 1330; Dattari 2199; Kampmann 35.66; SNG Cop 435; Curtis 595; Emmett 1377.4; BMC Alexandria p. 124, 1060 var. (AΔPA, laur. dr. bust), F, nice portrait, mild porosity, tight flan, tiny edge split, uneven strike with weak areas, weight 10.817 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 140 - 28 Aug 141 A.D.; obverse AVT - K T AIΛ AΔP - ANTWNINOC AY, laureate head right, bare right shoulder seen from behind; reverse Dikaiosyne (Aequitas) seated left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, date LΔ (year 4) upper left; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

|Titus|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.||as|NEW
Titus was the very popular victor of the Judaean rebellion. He ruled during the eruption of Vesuvius. Titus once complained he had lost a day because twenty-four hours passed without his bestowing a gift. He was, however, generous to a fault. Had he ruled longer, he might have brought bankruptcy and lost his popularity.
RB112162. Copper as, RIC II-1 p. 90, 468 (R3); BMCRE II -; Hunter I -; Cohen I -; BnF III -; SRCV I -, gF, centered, green patina, areas of corrosion, scratches, encrustation, small edge crack, weight 10.796 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 3rd issue, spring - 1 Jul 72 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II, laureate head right; reverse AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing half left, head left, scales in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) divided across field; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; purchased from a Vienna dealer; very rare; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00 ON RESERVE


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D.

|Otho|, |Otho,| |15| |January| |69| |-| |17| |April| |69| |A.D.||denarius|
Otho supported Galba's revolt against Nero in expectation he would be named heir. Since he was not, Otho had himself declared emperor. He ruled for only three months. After a minor defeat by Vitellius, Otho committed suicide. This was perhaps the only noble act of his life - he preferred to die rather than see more bloodshed in civil war.
SH75694. Silver denarius, RIC I 19 (R2), RSC II 9, BMCRE I 6, BnF III 22, SRCV I 2158, aEF, toned, die break on obverse, flan flaw on reverse, weight 3.526 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 9 Mar - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse IMP OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right; reverse PONT MAX (high priest), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; ex New York Sale XXVIII (5 Jan 2012), lot 1063; rare; SOLD


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

|Pertinax|, |Pertinax,| |31| |December| |192| |-| |28| |March| |193| |A.D.||denarius|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas, also known as Aecetia, was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also a personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). She is depicted with a cornucopia and a balance suggesting Aequitas Augusti is a source of prosperity.
SH21377. Silver denarius, RIC IV 1a (R2); BMCRE V p. 3, 15; RSC III 2; Hunter III 5; SRCV II 6038, VF, weight 3.228 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 28 Mar 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse AEQVIT AVG TR P COS II, Aequitas standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

|Pertinax|, |Pertinax,| |31| |December| |192| |-| |28| |March| |193| |A.D.||denarius|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas, also known as Aecetia, was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also a personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). She is depicted with a cornucopia and a balance suggesting Aequitas Augusti is a source of prosperity.
SH27768. Silver denarius, RIC IV 1a (R2); BMCRE V p. 3, 15; RSC III 2; Hunter III 5; SRCV II 6038, VF, toned, weight 3.195 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 28 Mar 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse AEQVIT AVG TR P COS II, Aequitas standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Agrippina Senior, Wife of Germanicus, Mother of Caligula and Agrippa Jr., Died 18 October 33 A.D.

|Agrippina| |Sr.|, |Agrippina| |Senior,| |Wife| |of| |Germanicus,| |Mother| |of| |Caligula| |and| |Agrippa| |Jr.,| |Died| |18| |October| |33| |A.D.||dupondius|
Most references identify the portrait as Livia, but as David Vagi notes, "the bust of Justitia represents (but seemingly does not portray) Antonia and/or Agrippa Senior. It no doubt reflects the justice they received from the trial of Piso for the murder of Germanicus." He explains that the portrait does not appear to be of either of them, perhaps because it was intended to represent them both simultaneously.

Since Agrippina knew, but had no evidence, that Piso murdered Germanicus on orders from Tiberius, she was not satisfied with this "justice" and continued to be an outspoken critic of Tiberius and his prefect, Sejanus. Sejanus had her accused of adultery. She was flogged so severely that she lost an eye, and was banished to the island of Pandateria where she starved to death four years later. Her sons Nero Caesar and Drusus Caesar also died imprisoned. When her son Caligula became emperor, the first act of his reign was to return the ashes of his mother and brothers to Rome.
RB58415. Orichalcum dupondius, Vagi Antonia 498, RIC I Tiberius 46, BMCRE I Tiberius 79, BnF II Tiberius 57, Cohen I Livie 4, SRCV I Livia 1739, VF, weight 13.937 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 22 - 23 A.D.; obverse IVSTITIA, diademed and draped bust of Justitia right; reverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII, large S C; SOLD


Quietus, Fall or Winter 260 - Late 261 A.D.

|Quietus|, |Quietus,| |Fall| |or| |Winter| |260| |-| |Late| |261| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
SH26591. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1728f, RSC IV 1b, RIC V-2 2 (R), Hunter IV 1, SRCV III 10818, VF, weight 3.270 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Syrian mint, obverse IMP C FVL QVIETVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse AEQVTAS AVGG (sic), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; from the Scott Collection; rare; SOLD


Macrianus, Fall or Winter 260 - Early 261 A.D.

|Macrianus|, |Macrianus,| |Fall| |or| |Winter| |260| |-| |Early| |261| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RA26601. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1727k, RSC IV 1, RIC V-2 5 (R2), Hunter 1, SRCV III 10798, Choice VF, near full circle centering, weight 4.156 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, fall/winter 260 - early 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse AEQVTAS (sic) AVGG, Aequitas standing half left, scales in right hand, scepter in left hand, star left; rare; SOLD


Romano-Gallic Empire, Victorinus, Summer to November 268 - mid 271 A.D.

|Victorinus|, |Romano-Gallic| |Empire,| |Victorinus,| |Summer| |to| |November| |268| |-| |mid| |271| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RA77907. Billon antoninianus, Mairat 639, Schulzki AGK 1c, RIC V 41, Normanby 1427, Elmer 702, Cohen VI 8, SRCV III 11166, Hunter - (p. xcviii), gVF, nice for the issue, dark patina, excellent portrait, some die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.658 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, issue 1, phase 1, mid 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C PI VICTORINVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust resembling Marius right; reverse AEQVITAS AVG (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex CNG/Seaby Coins; SOLD







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