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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Numismatics| ▸ |Pseudo-Autonomous||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pseudo-Autonomous Roman Provincial

Coins minted by the cities and provinces of the Roman empire without the emperor's portrait on the obverse are described as pseudo-autonomous Roman provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.

Palmyra, Palmyrene, Syria, c. 150 - 225 A.D.

|Other| |Syria|, |Palmyra,| |Palmyrene,| |Syria,| |c.| |150| |-| |225| |A.D.||AE| |12|
Palmyra, a city in a large oasis in the Syrian Desert, 215 km northeast of Damascus, was the vital silk road caravan stop known as "the Bride of the Desert." Atargatis was the chief goddess of northern Syria, primarily a fertility goddess, but, she was also responsible for the protection and well-being of the people. Her chief sanctuary was at Hierapolis, modern Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, Syria. The Romans called her Dea Syria.
GB95894. Bronze AE 12, SNG Munchen 519; BMC Galatia p. 149, 2; Krzyzanowska Monnayage IV; SNG Cop -, gF, dark patina, earthen deposits, weight 1.663 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Palmyra mint, c. 150 - 225 A.D.; obverse Atargatis bust facing, head left, wearing turreted crown, thin crescent left, star right; reverse radiate bust of young Malakbel (solar deity) left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00
 


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mên. Mên had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPC Lydia 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlïkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Caesarea, Cappadocia, 111 - 112 A.D.

|Cappadocia|, |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia,| |111| |-| |112| |A.D.||AE| |16|NEW
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). During Achaemenid Persian rule, it was the capital of a Satrapy on the crossroads of the Royal Road from Sardis to Susa and the trade route from Sinope to the Euphrates. It was conquered by Alexander's general Perdikkas, was ruled by Eumenes of Cardia, then passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus. It became the capital of the independent Cappadocian Kingdom under Ariarathes III, around 250 B.C. During Strabo's time it was also known as Eusebia, after the Cappadocian King Ariarathes V Eusebes, 163 – 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus, upon his death in 14 A.D. The city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 A.D. In Roman times, it prospered on the route from Ephesus to the East. Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid King Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in 260 A.D. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri. The city gradually recovered and has a population of almost 1 million people today. Few traces of the ancient city survive.
RP97246. Bronze AE 16, RPC Online III 3141, Henseler I, p. 150, type 164, 259 - 260; SNGvA 6342, SNG Cop 173; Sydenham Caesarea 250; BMC Galatia -, F, rough from corrosion, weight 3.214 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, year 14 of Trajan, 111 - 112 A.D.; obverse turreted and draped bust of Tyche right; reverse pyramid or baetyl (sacred stone), ET − ∆I (year 14) divided across field; from a Las Vegas dealer; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |25|
Rome received Apameia with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C.
GB93764. Bronze AE 25, SNG Cop 167; SNG Munchen 116; BMC Phrygia p. 86, 97; HGC 7 670; SNGvA -, aVF, brassy high points with toned recesses, obverse slightly off center, light scratches, weight 8.633 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 45o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, wearing high-crested Corinthian helmet and aegis; reverse eagle alighting right from a basis ornamented with meander pattern, star above, basis flanked on each side by a star above a pileus, AΠAMEΩN above, ΦAINIΠΠOY / ∆PAKONTO ([magistrate] Phainippos, son of Drakon) in two lines below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Hermokapelia, Lydia, c. 117 - 138 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Hermokapelia,| |Lydia,| |c.| |117| |-| |138| |A.D.||AE| |16|
Hermokapeleia was east of Pergamon. Hermokapelia has never been officially excavated except for a surface survey. Little is known of the city and the coinage is rare.
RP97869. Bronze AE 16, BMC Lydia p. 100, 11, RPC III Online 1879 (14 spec.); SNG Cop 167; SNGvA -, VF, dark green patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, high points flatly struck, weight 2.994 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, Hermokapelia (near Suleymanköy, Turkey) mint, c. 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse EPMOKAΠHΛITΩN, turreted and draped bust of Roma right, monogram lower right; reverse ΘEON CYN-KΛHTON (N's retrograde), young, draped male bust of the Senate right; rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB93762. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 177; SNGvA 8338; SNG Ashmolean 960; BMC Phrygia p. 76, 40; Weber 7026; HGC 7 672, aVF, brassy high points with toned recesses, tight flan, light marks, weight 6.409 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arm supports, AΠAME downward on right, AN∆PON / AΛKIO (Androni(kos), son of Alkion, [eglogistes]) in two downward lines on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Sardes, Lydia, c. 212 - 217 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |c.| |212| |-| |217| |A.D.||AE| |16|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Men. Men had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
RP92868. Bronze AE 16, SNG Munchen 499; BMC Lydia p. 248, 86; Johnston Sardis 262; Lindgren-Kovacs A809A; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, dark green patina, porosity, weight 1.991 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, time of Caracalla, c. 212 - 217 A.D.; obverse ZEYC - ΛY∆IOC, diademed and draped bust of Zeus Lydios right; reverse CAP∆IANΩN, Herakles standing facing, head left, resting right hand on grounded club, Nemean lionskin on left arm; scarce; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Pergamon, Mysia, 114 - 116 A.D.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |114| |-| |116| |A.D.||AE| |18|
Pergamon, Mysia was the church that needed to repent (Revelation 2:16). According to Christian teaching and tradition, Pergamum is where Satan dwells, where his throne is, and the first bishop of Pergamon, Antipas, was martyred there c. 92 A.D. (Revelation 2:13)
RP97862. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 1725; BMC Mysia p. 135, 216; SNGvA 1387, F, dark patina, broad flan, scratches, rough, weight 3.535 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, strategos Ti. Cl. Meilatos, 114 - 116 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Roman Senate right, (magistrate's monogram) lower right; reverse ΘEAN PΩMHN, turreted and draped bust of Roma right; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86928. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, dark blue-green patina, die wear, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $55.00 SALE |PRICE| $49.50
 







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