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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Numismatics| ▸ |Pseudo-Autonomous||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pseudo-Autonomous Roman Provincial

Coins minted by the cities and provinces of the Roman empire without the emperor's portrait on the obverse are described as pseudo-autonomous Roman provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.

Palmyra, Palmyrene, Syria, c. 150 - 225 A.D.

|Other| |Syria|, |Palmyra,| |Palmyrene,| |Syria,| |c.| |150| |-| |225| |A.D.||AE| |12|
Palmyra, a city in a large oasis in the Syrian Desert, 215 km northeast of Damascus, was the vital silk road caravan stop known as "the Bride of the Desert." Atargatis was the chief goddess of northern Syria, primarily a fertility goddess, but, she was also responsible for the protection and well-being of the people. Her chief sanctuary was at Hierapolis, modern Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, Syria. The Romans called her Dea Syria.
GB95894. Bronze AE 12, SNG Munchen 519; BMC Galatia p. 149, 2; Krzyzanowska Monnayage IV; SNG Cop -, gF, dark patina, earthen deposits, weight 1.663 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Palmyra (Tadmur, Syria) mint, c. 150 - 225 A.D.; obverse Atargatis bust facing, head left, wearing turreted crown, thin crescent left, star right; reverse radiate bust of young Malakbel (solar deity) left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $240.00 SALE PRICE $216.00


Hierapolis, Phrygia, in Homonoia with Ephesos, 253 - 260 A.D.

|Hierapolis|, |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia,| |in| |Homonoia| |with| |Ephesos,| |253| |-| |260| |A.D.||diassarion|
The title NEOKOPON on the reverse of this type, and other similar coins, has been the topic of debate for more than a century. Hierapolis was honored with a neokoros (imperial temple) either during the reign of Caracalla or Elagabalus. Caracalla rarely gave this honor, but if the honor was given by Caracalla, it would have lasted many decades. If the honor was given during the reign of Elagabalus, as many numismatists and historians believe, it would have been lost with his damnatio. Yet, the title appears here, on a coin struck long after Elagabalus' demise. This coin, however, was struck by Hierapolis honoring its alliance (homonoia) with Ephesos, Ionia. After Elagabalus, at Hierapolis, neokoros titles only appear on homonoia coinage. It seems odd, especially since the title is on the reverse with the name Hierapolis, but the most supported argument is that NEOKOPON refers to a temple at Ephesos, not one at Hierapolis.
RP97256. Bronze diassarion, Franke-Nolle, type IX, 760 - 763 (B/49); Weber HpH p. 74 (A/b); Johnston Hierapolis -; BMC Phrygia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -, gVF, well centered and struck with full legends, nice dark green patina, some porosity, weight 5.120 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, time of Valerius and Gallienus, 253 - 260 A.D.; obverse OMONY/A - K EΦEC-IΩN (clockwise from 3:00), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse IEPAΠ-O-ΛEITΩN; NEOKO-PΩN in fields, clockwise from lower left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond against left shoulder in left hand; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 August 2020), lot 886; this coin is one of only two specimens of this type listed in Coin Archives auction records spanning the last two decades; very rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mn. Mn had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPC Lydia 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Maeonia, Lydia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Maeonia,| |Lydia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |18|
Maionia (or Maeonia) was a city of the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine era located near the Hermos River, in ancient Lydia. The town is mentioned by mentioned by Pliny the Elder, Hierocles, and in the Notitiae Episcopatuum. In antiquity the city was part of the Katakekaumene Decapolis of towns. Its site is near Menye in Asiatic Turkey.
RP97252. Bronze AE 18, GRPC Lydia III 59; RPC Online IV.2 T1318 (5 spec.); Waddington 5059; SNG Hunterian I 1988; SNG Soutzos 1522; BMC Lydia P 129, 14, gF, well centered, rough and porous, weight 2.858 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Maionia (near Menye, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC, laureate head of Demos right; reverse MAIONWN, cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arm supports; this is the first example of this type handled by Forum; scarce; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86928. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, dark blue-green patina, die wear, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $55.00 SALE PRICE $44.00







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