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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Numismatics| ▸ |Pseudo-Autonomous||View Options:  |  |  |   

Pseudo-Autonomous Roman Provincial

Coins minted by the cities and provinces of the Roman empire without the emperor's portrait on the obverse are described as pseudo-autonomous Roman provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.

Koinon of Macedonia, Portrait of Alexander the Great, 231 - 235 A.D.

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |231| |-| |235| |A.D.|, |triassarion|
The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year. The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
GB92396. Bronze triassarion, AMNG III 341, RPC Online -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Saroglos -, McClean -, Lindgren -, VF/F, near black patina, high points a bit flatly struck, light corrosion heavier at edge, central depressions, weight 9.353 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, reign of Severus Alexander, 231 - 235; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY clockwise on right, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ ONΩN NE (NE ligate), Zeus standing half left, head left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


Thessalonika, Macedonia, c. 54 - 68 A.D.

|Thessalonika|, |Thessalonika,| |Macedonia,| |c.| |54| |-| |68| |A.D.|, |AE| |16|
Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
GB92061. Bronze AE 16, Touratsoglou G.I/A; RPC I 1607 (13 spec. online); SNG Hunterian I 682; McClean 3776; AMNG III taf. XXIII, 23; BMC Macedonia -; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -, aVF, green patina, tight flan, weight 4.078 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, reign of Nero(?), c. 54 - 68 A.D.; obverse horse trotting right, crescent with horns upward above, star below raised foreleg; reverse ΘEΣ/ΣAΛON/IKEΩN in three lines within laurel wreath; ex CHS Basel Numismatics; very rare; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Kings of Bosporos, Polemo I, c. 14 - 9 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bosphoros|, |Kings| |of| |Bosporos,| |Polemo| |I,| |c.| |14| |-| |9| |B.C.|, |tetrachalkon|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
GB85937. Bronze tetrachalkon, Frolova-Ireland p. 52, pl. 33/1, pl. 34/1-5, MacDonald Bosporus 229, SNG Stancomb 961, Anokhin 256, HGC 7 347 (R2), RPC I -, SNG BM -, SNG Pushkin -, nice VF, bold strike, slightly off center, attractive near black patina with buff earthen highlighting, scratches, edge cracks, countermark, weight 9.295 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 14 - 9 B.C.; obverse head of gorgon Medusa (or Perseus? - most references say a gorgon) right, winged, snakes (or drapery) around neck, obscure round countermark before; reverse monogram of Polemo I; very rare; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |AE| |38|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
GB83542. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 5364; BMC Lycia p. 273, 41; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Righetti -; SNG Tb -, aVF, green patina, rough, pitting, corrosion, smoothing, edge chip, central cavities, weight 28.152 g, maximum diameter 37.8 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN AVTONOMΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Athena standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet, long chiton, and peplos, holding Nike offering wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet on far side of right leg, trophy of captured arms behind, Θ left; about twice the weight of the similar smaller and less rare coin with the same types (SNG BnF 2189, AE33, 14.06g); very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Maionia, Lydia, c. 161 - 217 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Maionia,| |Lydia,| |c.| |161| |-| |217| |A.D.|, |AE| |20|
Omphale was queen of the Lydian Kingdom, the wife of Tmolus, the oak-clad mountain king. After he was gored to death by a bull, she continued to reign on her own. She bought Herakles from Hermes, who sold him after an oracle declared Hercules must be sold into slavery for three years. Hercules had sought the oracle to learn what he must do to purify himself, after he murdered his friend Iphitus and stole the Delphic tripod. As a slave, Herakles was forced to do women's work and even wear women's clothing and hold a basket of wool while Omphale and her maidens did their spinning. Meanwhile, Omphale wore the skin of the Nemean Lion and carried Herakles' olive-wood club. But it was also during his stay in Lydia that Herakles captured the city of the Itones and enslaved them, killed Syleus who forced passersby to hoe his vineyard, and captured the Cercopes. He buried the body of Icarus and took part in the Calydonian Boar Hunt and the Argonautica. After some time, Omphale freed Herakles and took him as her husband. The Greeks did not recognize Omphale as a goddess. Omphale's name, connected with omphalos, a Greek word meaning navel (or axis), may, however, represent a Lydian earth goddess. Herakles' servitude and marriage may represent the servitude of the sun to the axis of the celestial sphere, the spinners being Lydian versions of the Moirae. This myth may have been an attempt to explain why the priests of Herakles wore female clothing.
GB86735. Bronze AE 20, SNG Leypold I 1053 (this scarcer rev. legend arrangement); RPC Online IV 1325; SNG Cop 222; SNGvA 3011; SNG Munchen 302; BMC Lydia p. 129, 17, VF, rough, reverse scratches, weight 5.130 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Maeonia mint, c. 161 - 217 A.D.; obverse bearded head of Herakles left; reverse MAIONΩN, Omphale advancing right, draped in Hercules lion skin, carrying his club in her left hand over her left shoulder; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Indigets,| |Untikesken,| |Emporion,| |Iberia,| |c.| |130| |-| |90| |B.C.|, |as|
Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Antiocheia, Pisidia, 138 - 161 A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia,| |138| |-| |161| |A.D.|, |AE| |14|
Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13-52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP89331. Bronze AE 14, RPC Online IV.3 T7350 (10 spec.); Krzyzanowska pl. IV, table 8, VII/- (cf. 7-9); BMC Lycia p. 176, 1; SNGvA 4916, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, cleaning scratches. , weight 1.401 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTIO-C-H, bare-headed, draped bust of Hermes (resemble young Marcus Aurelius as caesar) left, caduceus behind; reverse CO-LONI, cock walking right; ex CNG e-auction 400 (28 Jun 17), lot 528; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Iol-Caesarea, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.

|Mauretania|, |Iol-Caesarea,| |Mauretania,| |North| |Africa,| |c.| |25| |B.C.| |-| |24| |A.D.|, |1/4| |Unit|
Phoenicians from Carthage founded Iol as a trading station around 400 B.C. It became a part of the kingdom of Numidia under Jugurtha, c. 160 - 104 B.C. In 29 B.C., Roman emperor Augustus made the Numidian King Juba II and his wife Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Marc Antony and Cleopatra of Egypt) king and queen of Mauretania. The capital was established at Iol, which was renamed Caesarea in honor of the emperor.
GB85358. Bronze 1/4 Unit, Alexandropoulos MAA 147; Falbe-Lindberg III, p. 177, 290 (uncertain mint); SNG Cop 684 var. (kerykeion obv. left), F, dark green patina, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 2.102 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 270o, Iol-Caesarea (Cherchell, Algeria) mint, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.; obverse head of Isis left, wearing vulture crown and horned solar-disk headdress; reverse three ears of barley; extremely rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Kings of Galatia, Deiotaros, Tetrarch 63 - 59 B.C., King 59 - 40 B.C.

|Galatia|, |Kings| |of| |Galatia,| |Deiotaros,| |Tetrarch| |63| |-| |59| |B.C.,| |King| |59| |-| |40| |B.C.|, |AE| |25|
Deiotarus was chief of the Celtic Tolistobogii tribe in western Galatia and became King of Galatia. He was a faithful ally of Rome against Mithridates VI of Pontus, for which he was rewarded by Pompey. Caesar pardoned him for siding with Pompey in the civil war but he was deprived of some of his dominions. After Caesar's death, Mark Antony, for a large payment, publicly announced that, in accordance with instructions left by Caesar, Deiotarus was to resume possession of all the territory of which he had been deprived. When civil war broke out again, Deiotarus supported the anti-Caesarian party of Brutus and Cassius, but after the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C., he went over to the triumvirs. He retained his kingdom until his death at a very advanced age.
GB89293. Bronze AE 25, SNGvA 6103 (same countermark); Arslan K4; SNG BnF 2333; BMC Galatia p. 1, 1; HGC 7 774 (R2); see RPC I p. 536, aF, corrosion, reverse off center, weight 10.539 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 315o, uncertain Phrygian mint, 59 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of winged Nike right, hair in a bunch behind; reverse eagle standing right on a sheathed sword, wings open, head turned back left, flanked by pilei of the Dioscuri each with a star above, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, ∆HIOTAPOV below; very rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Sardes, Lydia, c. 212 - 217 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |c.| |212| |-| |217| |A.D.|, |AE| |16|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Men. Men had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
RP92868. Bronze AE 16, SNG Munchen 499; BMC Lydia p. 248, 86; Johnston Sardis 262; Lindgren-Kovacs A809A; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, dark green patina, porosity, weight 1.991 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, time of Caracalla, c. 212 - 217 A.D.; obverse ZEYC - ΛY∆IOC, diademed and draped bust of Zeus Lydios right; reverse CAP∆IANΩN, Herakles standing facing, head left, resting right hand on grounded club, Nemean lionskin on left arm; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00




  



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