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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Antiquities| ▸ |Antiquities by Type| ▸ |Vessels & Tableware||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Vessels and Tableware

See Toiletries and Grooming for smaller bottles used for perfumes and oils.

Kingdom of Judaea, First Temple Period, Pottery Wine Decanter or Beer Jug, 800 - 586 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Judaea,| |First| |Temple| |Period,| |Pottery| |Wine| |Decanter| |or| |Beer| |Jug,| |800| |-| |586| |B.C.|
This decanter form is the typical of the type unique to the Kingdom of Judaea during the First Temple Period. Historians debate what liquid this type of vessel would have contained. Wine seems likely, and decanter engraved with the word "wine" was recovered in excavations at the biblical Tel Lachish. Some, however, describe this decanter type as a beer jug!
AA99540. Kingdom of Judaea, Decanter; Gitin I, p. 362, 3.3.7.2; Lachish V pl. 24, 11 & pl. 49, 6; Tushingham fig. 2, 11, Choice, complete and intact, 23cm (9 1/8") tall, 14cm (5 1/2") diameter, Iron Age IIB - IIC, 800 - 586 B.C.; well shaped, wheel made, pink-orange clay, conical mouth, rounded rim, conical neck, strap handle from the neck to the shoulder, broad sloping shoulder with carinated edge, sack shaped body, ring base; ex Mera Antiq (Yossi Eilon) Tel Aviv, found in Israel; $2160.00 SALE PRICE $1944.00


Kingdom of Israel, Northern (Wide-Mouth) Decanter, First Temple Period, c. 925 - 721 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Israel,| |Northern| |(Wide-Mouth)| |Decanter,| |First| |Temple| |Period,| |c.| |925| |-| |721| |B.C.|
This decanter type with a wide-mouth and grooved rim is attributed to the Northern Kingdom of Israel. Similar types are attributed to the Kingdom of Judah but those have a narrower mouth. This northern type has been found in strata dated to after the Assyrian destruction. Almost certainly these specimens were made before the destruction of the Kingdom of Israel, but continued to be used, probably as prized possessions, for about another century.
AA99539. Kingdom of Israel, decanter, cf. Gitin pl. 3.2.6, 10; Amiran p. 259, photos 255 - 256; Tell Es-Sa'idiyeh fig. 11, 12; James Beth Shan fig. 71, 7, Choice, complete and intact, 22cm (8 5/8") tall, 14 cm (5 1/2") maximum diameter, Iron Age IIB - IIC, 925 - 721 B.C.; well shaped, wheel made, pink-orange clay, thin unburnished slip darkened to purplish gray, wide conical mouth, rounded grooved double rim, splayed conical neck, strap handle from the neck to the shoulder, sloping shoulder with carinated edge, ovoid body, ring base; ex Max Shick; $1980.00 SALE PRICE $1782.00


Canaanite, Tell El Yahudiyeh Ware, Piriform Juglet, c. 1750 - 1550 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Tell| |El| |Yahudiyeh| |Ware,| |Piriform| |Juglet,| |c.| |1750| |-| |1550| |B.C.|
Vessels of this type are called Tell el-Yahudiyeh Ware, named for the site in Egypt were they were first identified by Flinders Petrie. Despite the name, it is now believed that the earliest and most specimens, mostly juglets, were made by Canaanites in what is now Israel and Jordan. They were likely used for perfumed oils. Tell el-Yahudiyeh Ware is covered with a very dark grey-brown, almost black, burnished slip. The decoration is incised and pricked, and the resulting lines and holes are filled with white chalk to contrast with the vessel's surface. The specimens in Kaplan with the form, size, and decoration, most similar to our juglet were found at Jericho, Beth Shemesh, and Amman.
AA99531. Canaanite juglet; cf. Kaplan, piriform type 3, figs. 74a (form) & fig. 75a (decoration); Amiran pl. 36, 9 (different decoration), Choice, complete and intact, finely made, with elegant style, tiny chips in the rim and base; 15cm (6") tall, 10cm (4") maximum diameter; dark grey (Munsell color 5YR 4/1) slip, reverse everted rim, grooved strap handle from rim to the shoulder, narrow neck, inscribed decoration on shoulder - a band defined by two horizontal lines connected by dotted (pricked) vertical lines, piriform body, small ring base; ex Mera Antiq (Yossi Eilon, Tel Aviv), found in Israel; $1350.00 SALE PRICE $1215.00


Roman Judaea - Syria Palestina, Galilee, Kefar Hananya Ware, Kedera Cooking Pot, 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Judaea| |-| |Syria| |Palestina,| |Galilee,| |Kefar| |Hananya| |Ware,| |Kedera| |Cooking| |Pot,| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
"The pots from Kefar Sihin and Kefar Hananya do not usually break." -- Rabbi Yossi, Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 120b

Kefar Hananya was best known for production of cooking pots characterized by red-brown clay, distinctive ribbing or wheel-ridging on the body of the vessel and two handles for placing and removing the pot from the fire. Production of these cooking pots at Kefar Hananya began around 50 CE and extended to at least 430 CE. Wide-mouthed pots, most of which did not have handles (lifsa), were common in the first century BCE but began to be surpassed by the smaller-mouthed, handled cooking pot (kedera) in the first century CE.
AA99541. Judaean, kedera cooking pot, Adan-Bayewitz type 4E2 (simple rim variant), Crook fig. 4, Choice, complete and intact, two small rim chips; 14.0cm tall, 20.5cm diameter, predominantly reddish brown (Munsell color 2.5YR 5/8), some grayed areas, few white chalk grits, thin walls as typical, probably 4th century A.D.; simple rim, cylindrical neck, two strap handles from rim to shoulder, globular body with greatest diameter near the middle, wheel-ridged body and shoulder; base slightly pointed, ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 Apr 2015), with photocopy of Israel Antiquities Authority export approval certificate; $1260.00 SALE PRICE $1134.00


Roman Judaea - Syria Palestina, Galilee, Kefar Hananya Ware, Kedera Cooking Pot, 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Judaea| |-| |Syria| |Palestina,| |Galilee,| |Kefar| |Hananya| |Ware,| |Kedera| |Cooking| |Pot,| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
"The pots from Kefar Sihin and Kefar Hananya do not usually break." -- Rabbi Yossi, Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 120b

Kefar Hananya was best known for production of cooking pots characterized by red-brown clay, distinctive ribbing or wheel-ridging on the body of the vessel and two handles for placing and removing the pot from the fire. Production of these cooking pots at Kefar Hananya began around 50 CE and extended to at least 430 CE. Wide-mouthed pots, most of which did not have handles (lifsa), were common in the first century BCE but began to be surpassed by the smaller-mouthed, handled cooking pot (kedera) in the first century CE.
AA99526. Judaean, kedera cooking pot, Adan-Bayewitz type 4E1 (variant with ridge below lip), Choice, complete and intact; 11.0cm tall, 12.5cm diameter, predominantly reddish brown (Munsell color 2.5YR 5/6), some grayed areas, few white chalk grits, light encrustations, thin walls as typical, probably early 4th - early 5th century A.D.; exterior ridge below the lip, cylindrical neck, two strap handles from rim to shoulder, globular body with greatest diameter near the middle, wheel-ridged body and shoulder; base slightly pointed, ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 Apr 2015), with photocopy of Israel Antiquities Authority export approval certificate; $1260.00 SALE PRICE $1134.00


Judaean, Pottery Dipper Jug, Iron Age II, 1000 - 587 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Judaean,| |Pottery| |Dipper| |Jug,| |Iron| |Age| |II,| |1000| |-| |587| |B.C.|
This specimen is much more finely made than all the many similarly shaped but more carelessly made jugs in our references.
AA99525. Judaean, pottery dipper jug, cf. Amiran pl. 89, 6; Ustinov Potter UP141, Superb, complete and intact; 15.0cm (6") tall, 12.5cm (5") diameter, Iron Age II, 1000 - 587 B.C.; wheel made, red-brown clay, broad squat globular body, simple flattened base, high cylindrical neck, simple rounded vertical rim, strap handle from rim to shoulder; ex Mera Antiq (Yossi Eilon, Tel Aviv); found in Israel; $1080.00 SALE PRICE $972.00


Italy (Probably Canosa, Apulia), Daunian, Funnel Mouth Urn, c. 480 - 318 B.C.

|Pottery| |Antiquities|, |Italy| |(Probably| |Canosa,| |Apulia),| |Daunian,| |Funnel| |Mouth| |Urn,| |c.| |480| |-| |318| |B.C.|
Daunia comprises the north of Apulia from Bari to the promontory of Gargano, but pottery of the Daunian type is found beyond these limits to the north and west. Canosa was the center of production and exported far afield. Daunian pottery was somewhat barbaric but highly original and maintained its identity long after the work of neighboring regions was Hellenized. This unique vessel type with its huge funnel mouth is variously described in references as an urn, an olla, or a krater.
AG43827. Daunian funnel mouth urn; cf. CVA London, British Museum vii, Great Britain 10, pl. 462, 2 - 3, Collectible, funnel mouth reconstructed with a missing fragments, otherwise intact, 20cm (7 7/8") tall, rim diameter 21cm (8 1/4"), c. 480 - 318 B.C.; shaped by hand (no wheel), pinkish light brown clay, very large funnel mouth, globular body, two horizontal loop handles and two solid handles split at the top; painted black and brown geometrical motifs, primarily horizontal bands; ex Alex G. Malloy; $720.00 SALE PRICE $648.00


Kingdom of Israel, Samaria, Blackware Pyxis, 10th - Late 8th Century BCE

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Israel,| |Samaria,| |Blackware| |Pyxis,| |10th| |-| |Late| |8th| |Century| |BCE|
Ancient Samaria is mentioned in the Bible as the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel. Samaria was destroyed in 721 BCE, when the Kingdom of Israel fell to the Assyrians, and its people were taken to a foreign land as captives. The city was settled by the Macedonians during the Hellenistic period, but was again destroyed in 108 BCE by the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus. Augustus gave Herod the Great the city in 30 BCE. In honor of the emperor, Herod revived the city and renamed it Sebaste (Greek for Augustus).
AA99532. Kingdom of Israel, black pyxis; Zayadine pl. LXIII, 2 & fig. 7, 12 (Samaria); cf. Amiran p. 262, photo 255, Choice, complete and intact, surface bumps and marks, earthen deposits; 7.2cm (2 3/4") tall, 7.3cm (2 7/8") maximum diameter, 10th - Late 8th Century BCE; rounded rim, very slightly everted mouth, short cylindrical neck, spherical body, two pierced horizontal lug handles, vertical burnishing, no base; used for cosmetics; ex Bruce Munday (Australia, 2017); scarcer then the juglets; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Roman, Bronze Vessel Lid, c. 1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.

|Metal| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Bronze| |Vessel| || |Lid,| |c.| |1st| |Century| |B.C.| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
This lid would have been attached to the vessel with a chain, as seen on Ceci's Piccoli bronzi del Museo Nazionale di Napoli (New York, 1858)., tav. 1, 13.
AM20847. Roman bronze vessel lid, 13.5 cm diameter, green patina, earthen deposits, parts of edge ragged, c. 1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Sumerian (Uruk?), Limestone Cup Ornamented with Animals, Jemdet Nasr Period, 4th Millennium B.C.

|Vessels| |&| |Tableware|, |Sumerian| |(Uruk?),| |Limestone| |Cup| |Ornamented| |with| |Animals,| |Jemdet| |Nasr| |Period,| |4th| |Millennium| |B.C.|
AAA31037. height 7 cm (2 5/8"), rim diameter 6 cm (2 3/8"); The Louvre Near Eastern Antiqities, Ur Excavations Volume 4 The early periods (nearly identical), Collectible condition, two lion's attacking two bulls, high relief, one small piece re-attached, chips from rim; SOLD




  



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REFERENCES

Adan-Bayewitz, D. Common Pottery in Roman Galilee : A Study Of Local Trade. (Ramat Gan, Israel, 1993).
Adan-Bayewitz, David & Moshe Wieder, "Ceramics from Roman Galilee: A comparison of several techniques for fabric characterization' in Journal of Field Archaeology 19, no. 2 (1992), pp. 189 - 205.
Amiran, R. Ancient Pottery of the Holy Land From its Beginning in the Neolithic Period to the End of the Iron Age. (New Brunswick, NJ, 1970).
Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum - CVA Online - https://www.cvaonline.org/cva/
Dothan, T. Excavations at the Cemetery of Deir El-Balah. Qedem 10. (Jerusalem, 1979).
Ephraim S. Excavations at Tel Mevorakh (19731976). Part One: From the Iron Age to the Roman Period, Qedem 9. (Jerusalem, 1978).
Flinders, P. & J. Quibell. Naqada and Ballas. (London, 1896).
Gitin, S. (ed.). The Ancient Pottery of Israel and Its Neighbors, Volumes 1 and 2: from the Iron age through the Hellenistic Period. (Jerusalem, 2015).
Gitin, S. (ed.). The Ancient Pottery of Israel and Its Neighbors, Volume 3: from the Middle Bronze Age through the Late Bronze Age. (Jerusalem, 2019).
Hayes, J. Greek and Greek-Style Painted and Plain Pottery in the Royal Ontario Museum. (Toronto, 1992).
Hayes, J. Greek, Roman, and Related Metalware in the Royal Ontario Museum. (Toronto, 1984).
Hayes, J. Roman Pottery in the Royal Ontario Museum. (Toronto, 1976).
Hendrix, R., P. Drey, J. Storfjel. Ancient Pottery of Transjordan - An Introduction Utilizing Published Whole Forms Late Neolithic through Late Islamic. (Berrien Springs, MI, 2015).
Johnson, F. The Farwell Collection: Monographs on Archaeology and Fine Arts. (Cambridge, MA, 1953).
Kelley, A. The Pottery of Ancient Egypt Dynasty I to Roman Times. (Toronto, 1976).
Kenyon, K. Archaeology in the Holy Land. 5th ed. (1985).
Marquent-Krause, J. Les fouilles de 'Ay (et-Tell): La Resurrection d'une Grande Cite Biblique (Entreprises par le Baron Edmond de Rothschild, Bibliotheque Archeologique et Historique). (Paris, 1949).
Mazar, A. Excavations at Tell Qasile, Part Two: The Philistine Sanctuary: Various Finds, The Pottery, Conclusions, Appendixes. Qedem 20. (Jerusalem, 1985).
Mogensen, M. La Glyptotheque NY Carlsberg : La Collection Egyptienne. (Copenhagen, 1930).
Morris, D. The Art of Ancient Cyprus. (Oxford, 1985).
Nicholson, F. Greek, Etruscan and Roman Pottery. (1965).
Pande, B. "Harappan Ring-Kernoi: A Study" in East and West, Vol. 21, No. 3/4 (September-December 1971), pp. 311-323.
Rotroff, S. Hellenistic Pottery: The Plain Wares. The Athenian Agora Vol. 33. (Athens, 2006).
Sala, M. "Early Bronze II pottery productions at Tell es-Sultan" in Tell Es-Sultan (Rome, 2010), pp. 253 - 323.
Skupinska-Lovset, I. The Ustinov collection: The Palestinian pottery. (Oslo, 1976).

The list above excludes references for glass vessels and tableware. References for glass are listed on the shop's ancient glass page.

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