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Ancient Pottery
Byzantine Palestina III, Petraean-Early Byzantine Oil Lamp, c. 325 - 520 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine| |Palestina| |III,| |Petraean-Early| |Byzantine| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |325| |-| |520| |A.D.|,
Grawehr writes, "...firstly, lamps of this period were produced with great care and are well fired; they were of far better quality than their predecessors of the 3rd century A.D. Secondly, one single type - the Petraean-Early Byzantine lamp - is clearly dominating, and thirdly, this type is concentrated in a relatively small area east of the Wadi Arabah between Wadi Mujib and the Red Sea." He further notes that the quality attests to an upswing in the regional economy, but the distribution indicates increasing regionalism.
AL21909. Petraean-Early Byzantine Oil Lamp; Grawehr type L, 504 (very similar, Petra, Ez Zantur III, 325-520 A.D.); 8.7 cm long, 6.0 cm wide, Choice, intact, tiny chip in fill hole edge, small chip in shoulder (visible in photo), c. 325 - 520 A.D.; red clay, cream slip, mold-made, thin walled, piriform body, single rim around wick hole, double rim around large filling hole, very small knob handle, lines on nozzle radiating from wick hole the outer lines ending in a spiral, curved lines radiating from filling hole on shoulders, ring base, maker's mark VV on bottom below the handle; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), "Elongated" Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 400 - 620 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |"Elongated"| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |400| |-| |620| |A.D.|,
This type is identified by Adler as a Transjordan elongated lamp. Adler writes that the shoulders are narrow and ornamented with a wide variety of motifs including linear bands, geometric, and floral designs; the handle is tongue shaped projecting horizontally and decorated with three or more bands; the nozzle is decorated with geometric or floral designs or rarely a cross. The type is found in the northern part of Transjordan, and in Israel, mainly in northern Israel and the Beit Shean area. They date to the fifth and sixth century but possibly also the beginning of the seventh century. In the Hellenistic and Roman eras Beit Shean was the Decapolis city Scythopolis. Click the photo on the right of the Roman theater at Beit Shean, to learn more about the city. Scythopolis
AL93905. Transjordan elongated lamp; Adler type JOR.1, cf. 967 ff. (none with cross); 8.9 cm (3 1/2") long, Choice, complete and intact, small bumps, light deposits, traces of a white slip, c. 400 - 600/620 A.D.; pink clay, mold made, elongated body, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, double rim around large filling hole, convex shoulders ornamented with geometric pattern of dots and lines, cross on nozzle; rare with cross; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Large Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Large| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |300| |-| |500| |A.D.|,
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93907. Large Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 10.8 cm (4 1/4") long, Choice, complete and intact, much of slip remaining, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink clay, cream-buff slip, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern also with raised dots on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle; much larger then usual for the type; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Roman Palestina or Arabia, Nabataean Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 225 - 300 A.D.

|Hanukkah|, |Roman| |Palestina| |or| |Arabia,| |Nabataean| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |225| |-| |300| |A.D.|,
This lamp came to us in a group accumulated in Israel. The four Nabatean towns of Haluza, Mamshit, Avdat and Shivta, with their associated fortresses and agricultural landscapes linking them to the Mediterranean are in the Negev Desert, southern Israel today. In his, Nabataean Clay Lamps, an Analytical Study of Art and Myths, Nabil Khariy identifies lamps known from the Nabataean sites, especially Petra, which can be differentiated from Greek, Roman and Judaean parallels and identified specifically as Nabataean made. Khariy notes that although the Nabataeans lost their independence in 106 A.D., excavations clearly show aspects of Nabataean culture continued until late in the 6th century A.D. Khariy 66, similar to this lamp, is described as made with a local clay and cruder than similar lamps from non-Nabataean sites. Grawehr type J3, like this lamp, has a larger filling hole than most similar lamps. The larger filling hole is found on late examples of the type.
AL21908. Nabatean Oil Lamp; cf. Khariy 66; Grawehr J3 (Petra, 225-300 A.D.) Murray-Ellis p. 26, 16 (Petra, ND); Negev-Sivan p. 117, 129 (Mampsis, 75-200 A.D.), near Choice, intact, small chips in handle, c. 225 - 300 A.D.; reddish-brown clay, round body, small rounded nozzle, small knob handle, defined ridge separating shoulders from plain concave discus, ten stamped rosettes impressed around shoulders, very low ring base; $150.00 (Ä135.00)


Greek, Athens(?), Miniature Pottery Oil Lamp, c. late 6th - mid 5th century B.C.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Greek,| |Athens(?),| |Miniature| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |late| |6th| |-| |mid| |5th| |century| |B.C.|,
The referenced lamp from Isthmia is a very similar miniature lamp with the same shape and same dull brown glaze on buff pottery. Broneer identifies it as, "probably a local [Athens] product." Broneer also writes, "There are no close parallels from the Athenian Agora. See Corinth IV, ii, p. 137, fig 61, which, however is later, as shown by the longer nozzle" On later examples of this type, the nozzle is long enough that the wick hole does not extend into the shoulder or discus.
AH21462. Broneer Isthmia type IV, 59 (very similar), cf. Corinth IV 61 (longer nozzle, later), Getty Museum 7 (same, pink clay, S. Italy), Choice, complete and intact, much of brown slip lost (visible in photo), 2.8 cm (1 1/8") high, 5.8 cm (2 1/4") long; wheel-turned, partial dull brown slip on slightly pink buff pottery, round, deep, flat bottomed bowl with sides narrowing slightly to a groove setting off a low round disc base, slightly concave discus, no handle, small short projecting nozzle with wick hole extending into the discus, large fill hole; ex Edgar L. Owen; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Roman Palestina or Arabia, Nabataean Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 225 - 300 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Roman| |Palestina| |or| |Arabia,| |Nabataean| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |225| |-| |300| |A.D.|,
This lamp came to us in a group accumulated in Israel. The four Nabatean towns of Haluza, Mamshit, Avdat and Shivta, with their associated fortresses and agricultural landscapes linking them to the Mediterranean are in the Negev Desert, southern Israel today. In his, Nabataean Clay Lamps, an Analytical Study of Art and Myths, Nabil Khariy identifies lamps known from the Nabataean sites, especially Petra, which can be differentiated from Greek, Roman and Judaean parallels and identified specifically as Nabataean made. Khariy notes that although the Nabataeans lost their independence in 106 A.D., excavations clearly show aspects of Nabataean culture continued until late in the 6th century A.D. Khariy 66, similar to this lamp, is described as made with a local clay and cruder than similar lamps from non-Nabataean sites. Grawehr type J3, like this lamp, has a larger filling hole than most similar lamps. The larger filling hole is found on late examples of the type.
AL93928. Nabatean Oil Lamp; cf. Khariy 66; Grawehr J3 (Petra, 225-300 A.D.) Murray-Ellis p. 26, 16 (Petra, ND); Negev-Sivan p. 117, 129 (Mampsis, 75-200 A.D.), Choice, complete and intact, interesting root marks in the bottom of the interior, c. 225 - 300 A.D.; buff clay, round body, small rounded nozzle, small knob handle, defined ridge separating shoulders from plain concave discus, 16 stamped rosettes impressed around shoulders, very low ring base; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), "Elongated" Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 400 - 620 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |"Elongated"| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |400| |-| |620| |A.D.|,
This type is identified by Adler as a Transjordan elongated lamp. Adler writes that the shoulders are narrow and ornamented with a wide variety of motifs including linear bands, geometric, and floral designs; the handle is tongue shaped projecting horizontally and decorated with three or more bands; the nozzle is decorated with geometric or floral designs or rarely a cross. The type is found in the northern part of Transjordan, and in Israel, mainly in northern Israel and the Beit Shean area. They date to the fifth and sixth century but possibly also the beginning of the seventh century. In the Hellenistic and Roman eras Beit Shean was the Decapolis city Scythopolis. Click the photo on the right of the ancient ruins at Beit Shean, to learn more about the city. Scythopolis
AL93937. Transjordan elongated lamp; Adler type JOR.1, cf. 971 (slightly larger, very similar ornamentation); 8.9 cm (3 1/2") long, Choice, complete and intact, c. 400 - 600/620 A.D.; pink clay, mold made, elongated body, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, double rim around large filling hole, radiating bands on convex shoulders, dots and lines (grapes on vine) on nozzle; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Roman Arabia, Gerasa, Decapolis (|Jerash, Jordan), Jerash Oil Lamp, c. 70 - 150 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Roman| |Arabia,| |Gerasa,| |Decapolis| |(|Jerash,| |Jordan),| |Jerash| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |70| |-| |150| |A.D.|,
Jerash, Jordan is north of the national capital Amman. Inhabited since the Bronze Age, itís known for the ruins of the walled Greco-Roman city Gerasa just outside the modern city. The historian Josephus mentions the city as being principally inhabited by Syrians, but also having a small Jewish community. "Jerash lamps" parallel the very similar Jewish "Daroma" lamps" of Judaea. A large group of "Jerash lamps" was found in a potters shop excavated in Jerash, hence the name. Some Jerash lamps have been found in Israel, at Beit-Guvrin, Nazareth, Caesarea, and other sites. Usually the nozzle is decorated with a fig or grape leaf, decorations on the shoulders vary but floral and geometric patterns are most common. Jerash lamps are most easily identified when they have a red slip is carelessly splashed on the upper half. Gerasa
AL93897. Jerash Oil Lamp, cf. Adler 3.4, 356; Schloessinger 391; Baily BMC -; 8.9 cm (3 1/2") long; 5.7 cm (2 1/4") wide, near Choice, a few bumps, ornamentation a little weak with details obscure, light deposits, c. 70/75 - 150 A.D.; mold made, fine buff-brown clay, red slip "carelessly splashed" on the upper half, round body, bow shaped nozzle, knob handle, flat low disk base, ornamented with a leaf(?) on the nozzle, a bunch of grapes and grape leaves on each side of the curved shoulders; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Byzantine - Islamic, Eastern Mediterranean, Unglazed Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 6th - 7th Century A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine| |-| |Islamic,| |Eastern| |Mediterranean,| |Unglazed| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |6th| |-| |7th| |Century| |A.D.|,
This type has been found in Egypt, Cyprus and the Levante. We purchased this lamp many years ago from a New Jersey dealer. It was part of a large of a group of lamps which he acquired from a dealer in Jerusalem.
AH21446. unglazed pottery oil lamp; cf. Bailey BMC III Q2276 (Wadi Sarga, near Asyut, Egypt), Schloessinger 506 - 507 (Jerusalem), near Choice, complete and intact, encrustations, partial slip, c. 6th - 7th Century A.D.; 8.5 cm (3 3/8") long, 5 cm (2") tall; pink-orange clay with a brown slip, wheel made with applied nozzle and handle, slightly flared filling hole, narrow neck, body lightly ribbed with wheel marks, wide steep shoulders to a low carination, nozzle slightly rising, handle attached at filling hole rim and shoulder; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), "Elongated" Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 400 - 620 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |"Elongated"| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |400| |-| |620| |A.D.|,
This type is identified by Adler as a Transjordan elongated lamp. Adler writes that the shoulders are narrow and ornamented with a wide variety of motifs including linear bands, geometric, and floral designs; the handle is tongue shaped projecting horizontally and decorated with three or more bands; the nozzle is decorated with geometric or floral designs or rarely a cross. The type is found in the northern part of Transjordan, and in Israel, mainly in northern Israel and the Beit Shean area. They date to the fifth and sixth century but possibly also the beginning of the seventh century. In the Hellenistic and Roman eras Beit Shean was the Decapolis city Scythopolis. Click the photo on the right of the Roman theater at Beit Shean, to learn more about the city. Scythopolis
AL93927. Transjordan elongated lamp; Adler type JOR.1, cf. 967 - 968 (similar ornamentation); 8.6 cm (3 5/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, small cut on rim, tiny chips in handle, minor deposits (visible in photos), c. 400 - 600/620 A.D.; pink-orange clay, mold made, elongated body, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, double rim around large filling hole, pattern of dots in the angles of zig-zag lines on the shoulders and nozzle, decorative circle on the bottom (not a true ring base); $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00




  



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