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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Denominations| ▸ |Eastern Denarii||View Options:  |  |  | 

Eastern Denarii
Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS111386. Silver denarius, RIC IV p. 167, 555; BMCRE V p. 161, 32; RSC III 76; SRCV II 6585; Hunter III -, Choice EF, luster, well centered and struck, lightly toned, flow lines, small edge cracks/splits, weight 3.307 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 196 - 202 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, loop at neck (Laodicea mintmark); reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing half left, head left, long palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, fold of drapery over left arm; ex Artemide (San Marino) auction 59E (2-3 Jul 2022), lot 576; scarce; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH28187. Silver denarius, cf. Lanz 114, 447 and CNG 61, 1848 (both with different obv legends); cf. RIC IV 29 for rev type (based on BMC specimen which doesn't actually exist), gVF but softly struck, weight 3.105 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse [IMP CAES C] PESCE NIGER IVSTI AV, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna standing left, grounded long palm vertical in right, cornucopia in left; extremely rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |CHORTIS| |SPECVLATORVM||denarius|
Speculatores served the legions as spies, scouts, messengers, lookouts, and executioners. Aboard ship speculatores stood watch as lookouts in a turret (specula) at the stern, explaining their unusual standards. Normally ten speculatores were assigned to each legion. Anthony formed a separate cohort of speculatores which served him personally and also acted as his personal bodyguard. Augustus would later create a speculatorian cohort at Rome to serve as the inner corps of the praetorian guard. This coin probably refers to the naval equivalent, who were comparable to the Marines and provided a shipboard bodyguard for Antony.
SH76389. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1484, Crawford 544/12, Sydenham 1214, BMCRR II East 185, RSC I 6, Sear CRI 386, Choice VF, well centered on full flan, toned, banker's mark and V graffito on obverse, scratches, weight 3.636 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Patrae(?) mint, autumn 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with fluttering banners at prow, border of dots; reverse CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM, three standards, each decorated with two wreaths and a model war galley prow, border of dots; ex CNG auction 76/2 (12 Sep 2007), lot 3262; ex John A. Seeger Collection; this ex-Forum coin is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum; rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI - Ferrata, the "Ironclad"

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |LEG| |VI| |-| |Ferrata,| |the| |"Ironclad"||denarius|
The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad," was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus issued a 'restitution' of the type, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns.
SH76382. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/19, Sydenham 1223, BMCRR II East 197, RSC I 33, Sear CRI 356, Choice EF, near perfect centering, light toning, slightly uneven strike, contact marks, areas of porosity and light corrosion, weight 3.664 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Forum (2005); SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
SH35846. Silver denarius, Unpublished; cf. RIC IV 72 aureus from Num. Chron., 1908, pp. 90 ff. (R5); RSC -, VF, weight 4.724 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse [IMP CA]ES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, laureate head right; reverse ROMAE AETER (eternal Rome)NA-E, Roma seated left, cornucopia in right, left rests on a rudder on globe; unique?; SOLD


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Second| |Triumvirate,| |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavian,| |Spring| |-| |Early| |Summer| |41| |B.C.||denarius|
The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.

In 41 B.C., Lucius Antonius, Mark Antony's younger brother, and Fulvia, Mark Antony's wife, anxious to get her husband back from Cleopatra, raised eight legions against Octavian. Lucius marched on Rome, drove out Lepidus, and promised the people that the triumvirate would be abolished. On the approach of Octavian, he retired to Perusia in Etruria, where he was besieged by three armies, and compelled to surrender in the winter of 41 B.C. The city was destroyed but Lucius was spared, and was sent by Octavian to Spain as governor. Nothing is known of the circumstances or date of his death.
SH57461. Silver denarius, Crawford 517/2, Sydenham 1181, BMCRR East 103, Sear CRI 243, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, SRCV I 1504, gVF, flat strike areas, weight 3.816 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
Emesa frequently copied old coin reverse types. Sometimes they even copied old inscriptions listing honors that applied, not to the current emperor, but to the long dead emperor who issued the copied type. The normal Severan crescent and seven stars reverse has the legend SAECVL FELICIT (era of happy good fortune). Only a few Severan examples are known with this AETERNITAS AVS legend, copied from Pescennius Niger. We know of one example for Julia Domna, two for Severus with a COS obverse legend, and this coin with a COS II obverse. This coin is unpublished and, to the best of our knowledge, unique
SH59264. Silver denarius, Unpublished and likely unique; RIC IV -, RSC III -, BMCRE V -, Mazzini -; Hunter -, aVF/VF, light toning, weight 2.648 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse AETERNITAS AVS , crescent and seven stars; extremely rare; SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH33752. Silver denarius, RIC IV 77, Cohen III 68, VF, porous, weight 2.444 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVSTI AVG, laureate head right; reverse SALVTI AVGVSTI, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right from patera in left, altar at feet; well centered; rare; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
SH32678. Silver denarius, unpublished in major references, RSC III -, RIC IV -, BMCRE V -, SRCV II -, EF, weight 3.004 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse FORT AVG, Fortuna seated left on throne without back, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; extremely rare; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
SH21201. Silver denarius, Hunter III 4 (same dies), RIC IV 4 var., RSC III 15 var., BMCRE V 91 var., SRCV II 6141 var. (all var. Rome mint, SEPT vice SEP), aVF, exceptionally large flan for the type with full legend on both obverse and reverse, frosty surfaces, weight 2.684 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEP (sic) AL-BIN CAES, bare head right; reverse FELICITAS COS II, Felicitas standing half left, caduceus in right hand, scepter in left hand; very rare; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Thursday, September 28, 2023.
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