Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 5 July!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 5 July!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Horse||View Options:  |  |  |   

Horses on Ancient Coins
Syracuse, Sicily, c. 415 - 410 B.C., Double Signed by Eumenes

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |c.| |415| |-| |410| |B.C.,| |Double| |Signed| |by| |Eumenes||tetradrachm|
Boldly signed by the artist Eumenes (Eumenos) on both the obverse and reverse.
SH28067. Silver tetradrachm, Tudeer 17, 23 (same die); SNG ANS 258 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XLII, 12; Jameson 792; Weber 1596, VF, toned, small cut, weight 17.041 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, obverse charioteer driving galloping quadriga left, kentron in right, reins in left; Nike flying above crowning charioteer; signature EVMHNOV in ex; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION (final N retrograde), head of Arethusa left, four dolphins around, EVMHNOV behind; rare; SOLD


Canaanite, Palestine or Syria, Terracotta Figure of Baal on Horse, 1900 - 1600 B.C.

|Terracotta| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Palestine| |or| |Syria,| |Terracotta| |Figure| |of| |Baal| |on| |Horse,| |1900| |-| |1600| |B.C.|NEW
Muscarella notes of the very similar male figure in Ladders to Heaven, "The sylizations of the facial features and the headdress come closest to those seen on heads of figures found in the Hama Level H. Apparently similar fragmentary seated figures also appear at Hamma Level H, ALalakh Level, V, Elbla and at other sites in Palestine and Syria, sometimes with one or two similar implements held in the hands. Whether these implements have divine or royal significance is unclear, but they are surely indicative of status. The fact that several such figurines exist in clay, suggests to this writer that they emulate a well-known cult image holding the same symbols."

Curiously, in "Iron Age Figurines from Philistia," David Ben-Shlomo writes, terracotta horses and horses with riders are "especially abundant in Judaean sites." These figures are, however, of a very different style, and much later, from Iron Age II and the Persian period 1000 - 330 B.C.
AT23904. cf. Muscarella Ladders to Heaven 201 (very similar male figure on 4-legged stool) and 202 (very similar horse with saddle, no rider), near Choice, complete, right rear leg of horse reattached, museum quality, very rare, extremely rare complete, terracotta male figure (probably Baal - a god) seated facing on horse right, bearded, eyes and ears of pierced pellets, wearing ankle length garment and headdress with vertical incisions ornamenting brim, holding implement (axe?) in right hand, horse with saddle and pierced pellet eyes, from an Israeli dealer; $850.00 SALE PRICE $765.00


Eastern Danubian Celts, 306 - 281 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Eastern| |Danubian| |Celts,| |306| |-| |281| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The earliest Celtic imitations of Philip II tetradrachms are very similar to the Macedonian originals. It isn't always completely clear if a coin is a Celtic imitative or an oddly engraved Macedonian original. Fairly quickly the imitative inscriptions were shortened and then blundered. Over time the head of Zeus was increasingly "Celticized" and eventually both the head of Zeus and the horseman devolved into barely recognizable abstract forms. This coin with a rather exotic head of Zeus and odd (female?) rider on the reverse, could never be confused with the Macedonian prototype.
CE98735. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 590 (same dies); CCCBM I 28 and pl. XVIII S26; Pink 296 ff.; Gbl OTA 296, De la Tour 9870, VF, centered, radiating flow lines, toned, die wear, small cut above eye, weight 11.808 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 306 - 281 B.C.; obverse Celticized head of Zeus right; reverse naked youth (female?) on horse pacing left, vertical branch in left hand; derived from the Macedonian Kingdom tetradrachms of Philip II; from the CEB Collection; ex Numismatic Fine Arts (NFA) Winter Bid Sale (18 Dec 1987), lot 147; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Celts, Carpathian Region, The Dacian Costoboci(?), c. 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celts,| |Carpathian| |Region,| |The| |Dacian| |Costoboci(?),| |c.| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia||tetradrachm|
The Dacian Costoboci were an ancient people located, during the Roman imperial era, north of Dacia (probably north-east of Dacia), between the Carpathian Mountains and the river Dniester. During the Marcomannic Wars the Costoboci invaded the Roman empire in 170 or 171 A.D., pillaging its Balkan provinces as far as central Greece, until they were driven out by the Romans. Shortly afterwards, the Costoboci's territory was invaded and occupied by Vandal Hasdingi and the Costoboci disappeared from surviving historical sources, except for a mention by the late Roman Ammianus Marcellinus, writing around 400 A.D.
CE99269. Silver tetradrachm, Schnabelpferd type, imitative of Philip II of Macedon; CCCBM I 78 - 79; Gbl OTA pl. 28, 326/1; Lanz 666, VF, toned, marks, small spots of corrosion/encrustation, tight flan, domed obverse, weight 8.248 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 45o, northern Carpathian region mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse Celticized laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Celticized naked youth on horse advancing left, "beak" horse head, rider reduced to dotted outline around curved line; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Seuthes III, c. 330 - 295 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Thracians,| |Odrysian| |Kingdom,| |Seuthes| |III,| |c.| |330| |-| |295| |B.C.||AE| |18|NEW
Seuthes was the high priest of the Cabeiri, and the king of the Odrysian Thracians. He revolted against Macedonia about 325 B.C., after Alexander's governor Zopyrion was killed in battle against the Getae. Seuthes was apparently subdued by Antipater, but after Alexander died in 323 B.C. he again took up arms in opposition to the new governor Lysimachus. They fought to a draw and both withdrew, but ultimately Seuthes acknowledged Lysimachus' authority. In 320 B.C., Seuthes III moved the Odrysian kingdom to central Thrace and built his capital city at Seuthopolis. In 313 B.C. he supported Antigonus I against Lysimachus, occupying the passes of Mount Haemus, but was again defeated and forced to submit to Lysimachus. After Lysimachus died in 281 B.C., Thrace came under the suzerainty of Ptolemy Keraunos.|Head| of |Seuthes| |III|
GB99019. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 1073; Youroukova 80; SNG Stancomb 294 (six-pointed); Peter p. 182, 4 (eight-pointed); SNG BM Black Sea 319 var. (wreath vice star), aVF, green patina, light earthen deposits, small cut, porosity, weight 3.734 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Seuthopolis (near Kazanlak, Bulgaria) mint, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Seuthus III right; reverse horseman cantering right, left foreleg raised, ΣEYΘOY above, five-pointed star below horse (control); scarce; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Islamic, Seljuqs of Rum, Suleiman (Sulayman) II b. Qilij Arslan, 1196 - 1204 A.D.

|Islamic|, |Islamic,| |Seljuqs| |of| |Rum,| |Suleiman| |(Sulayman)| |II| |b.| |Qilij| |Arslan,| |1196| |-| |1204| |A.D.||fals|
Suleiman ibn Qutulmish founded the Rum Sultanate, with its capital at Konya (Iconium to the Romans), after he defeated the Byzantine emperor Romanus IV in 1077 A.D. and overran much of Anatolia. "Rum" was the Persian name for Rome and the Seljuqs called Anatolia "Rum" because it was part of the Roman-Byzantine Empire for centuries. The Seljuks ruled in Anatolia independently until 1243, and thereafter until 1302 as vassals of the Mongol Ilkhans. It was the last surviving Seljuk territory.Seljuqs_of_Rum
IS98874. Bronze fals, Album 1205.2, Mitchiner WOI 963, F, flan flaw (pit) on reverse, edge cracks, weight 5.642 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 135o, Konya(?) mint, AH 595 - 600; obverse nimbate horseman right, mace in right over shoulder, star behind; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: al-sultan al-qahir / Suleiman Shah bin / Qilij Arslan; Arabic date in margin, no mint named (as always); $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Kolophon, Ionia, 330 - 285 B.C.

|Colophon|, |Kolophon,| |Ionia,| |330| |-| |285| |B.C.||dichalkon|
After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos, c. 285 B.C. After Lysimachus' death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered.
GB98895. Bronze dichalkon, Milne Kolophon 103 ff. var.; SNG Cop 151 var.; Milne Kolophon 105(c) var.; BMC Ionia p. 38, 23 var.; SNGvA 2011 var. (none with this magistrate), aVF, green patina, porosity/pitting, weight 2.246 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 330 - 285 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair in loose locks; reverse forepart of galloping bridled horse right, ∆IONYΣATH (or similar, magistrate's name) upward on left, KOΛ below; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL99007. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 284, 8 (also 1st officina); RIC VIII Alexandria p. 539, 12; LRBC I 1454; SRCV V 17490; Cohen VII 760, VF, full border obverse, dark brown patina, a little rough, small edge cracks, weight 1.580 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Alexandria mint, posthumous, 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse Emperor in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, SMALA in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL99008. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 37, LRBC I 1372, SRCV V 17488, Voetter 33, Cohen VII 760, Hunter V -, gVF, well centered, scattered minor pitting, weight 1.571 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, star above, SMANE in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Pontos (Uncertain City), c. 119 - 100 B.C.

|Pontic| |Kingdom|, |Pontos| |(Uncertain| |City),| |c.| |119| |-| |100| |B.C.||AE| |11|
The comets depicted are almost certainly the comets described in Justin's epitome of the Historiae Philippicae of the Augustan historian Pompeius Trogus (Justin 37.2.1-2): "The future greatness of this man [Mithridates Eupator] had been foretold by heavenly portents. For both in the year in which he was born [134/133 B.C.] and in the year in which he first began to rule [120/119 B.C.], a comet gleamed so brightly for 70 days throughout each period that the whole sky seemed to be on fire. In its extent, each of these comets filled one quarter of the sky and surpassed the sun in brilliance. They took four hours to rise and four hours to set."
GB99175. Bronze AE 11, SNG BM 984, SNG Stancomb 653, Lindgren III 154, HGC 7 317, VF, area of corrosion, light scratches, weight 1.110 g, maximum diameter 10.9 mm, die axis 180o, Pontos, uncertain mint, c. 119 - 100 B.C.; obverse horse-head right, with comet/star of eight points and central pellet on neck; reverse comet star of seven points, central pellet, and horse/comet tail to right; rare; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Thursday, June 30, 2022.
Page created in 2.281 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity