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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Horse||View Options:  |  |  |   

Horses on Ancient Coins
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaios,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.||stater|
Struck shortly after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's mentally disabled brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's infant son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who, knowing they could not rule, only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. We don't know if this coin was posthumously struck in the name of Philip II, or struck in the name of the reigning (but not actually ruling) Philip III.
SH112514. Gold stater, Le Rider pl. 57 ff., SNG ANS 172 ff., SNG Cop 529, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, light bumps and marks, weight 8.557 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer driving biga right, kentron in right hand, reins in left hand, kantharos (control) below, ΦIΛIΠΠOY in exergue; ex BSD Coins; $3000.00 SALE PRICE $2700.00 ON RESERVE


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
A decursio was a military exercise, by which Roman soldiers were taught to make long marches in a given time, under arms and without quitting their ranks. They sometimes consisted of a mock fight between two divisions. Augustus and subsequently Hadrian ordered that the infantry and cavalry were to march out three times a month ten miles from the camp and ten miles back, fully armed and equipped. Decursio on this coin probably refers Nero's participation in mock military maneuvers in the circus.
SL111603. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 168 (S); BMCRE I p. 226, 142; BnF II -; Hunter I -; SRCV I -, ANACS VF30 (7432075, says Lugdunum mint in error), dark spots are where the plastic holder is in contact with the coin, weight 27.15 g, maximum diameter 35.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head left; reverse DECVRSIO, Nero and a soldier on horseback prancing right, Nero bear headed, wearing cuirass and short tunic, and holds spear in right hand, soldier, on far side and slightly behind, holds vexillum in right over shoulder, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking high across field; ex Classical Coins, ANACS| Verify; $970.00 SALE PRICE $873.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 320 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |356| |-| |320| |B.C.||drachm|
When Larissa ceased minting the federal coins it shared with other Thessalian towns and adopted its own coinage in the late fifth century B.C., it chose local types for its coins. The obverse depicted the local fountain nymph Larissa, for whom the town was named, probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse depicted a horse in various poses.
GS111232. Silver drachm, cf. BCD Thessaly 1432, BCD Thessaly II 316 ff., SNG Cop 121; HGC 4 454, VF, toned, scratches, encrustations, rev. off center, weight 4.820 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing pendant earring and necklace, hair is combed back behind ampyx; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg raised, preparing to lie down, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN in two lines above and in exergue; $325.00 SALE PRICE $293.00


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Anazarbus,| |Cilicia||tetrassaria|
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire it was known as Kaicareωn (Caesarea), and was the Metropolis (capital) of the late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Byzantine emperor Justin I after an earthquake in the 6th century, it became Justinopolis (525); but the old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva.
RP110457. Bronze tetrassaria, apparently unpublished; Ziegler - (Vs6/Rs12), RPC Online VI -, VF, broad flan, green patina, some legend unstruck, a little rough, small edge cracks, weight 12.496 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 229 - 230 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AY CE AΛΕΞANΔPOC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse ANAZAPBOY MHTPO, saddled horse right, left foreleg raised, ΓB (holder of 3 neocorates) above, ET ΘMC (year 249) in exergue; perhaps unique; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

|Maxentius|, |Maxentius,| |February| |307| |-| |28| |October| |312| |A.D.||follis|
On 11 November 308, attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, at the Congress of Carnuntum, the Tetrarchy declared Maxentius a public enemy, Licinius was proclaimed Augustus, and Constantine I was made Caesar of Britain and Gaul.
RT111554. Billon follis, Hunter V 28, RIC VI Ostia 35, Cohen VII 5, SRCV IV 14975, aEF/VF, well centered, dark patina, centers a little flat/weak, weight 6.984 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 309 - 28 Oct 312 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder from behind; reverse AETERNITAS AVG N, Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, naked except chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand, MOSTP in exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 124 (8 Jan 2023), lot 946 (part of); $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 253 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |253| |-| |268| |A.D.||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP112281. Bronze diassarion, BMC Phrygia p. 162, 13; SNGvA 3774; SNG Mnchen 315; SNG Cop -, VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, weight 12.431 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kotiaeion (Ktahya, Turkey) mint, time of Gallienus, c. 253 - 268 A.D.; obverse ΔHMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI Π AIΛ ΔHMHTPIANOV IΠΠI, AP-X across fields (under the authority of P. Aelius Demetrius, Archon, HMH ligate), Sol standing in facing spread quadriga, head left, raising right hand commanding sunrise, globe in left hand, no star and crescent below horses, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, as Satrap of Thrace, 323 - 305 B.C., Struck by Kassander

|Macedonia|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Lysimachos,| |as| |Satrap| |of| |Thrace,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Kassander||unit|NEW
This type was likely struck by Kassander at Amphipolis for Lysimachos, perhaps while Lysimachos was battling the Thracian tribes. With the support of Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, Kassander defeated Polyperchon, and declared himself the Macedonian regent in 317 B.C. Lysimachos was satrap in Thrace and some adjoining territory, an area without a royal mint. Lysimachos and Kassander were related by marriage and bound by mutual trust, respect, and unwavering friendship. Kassander likely supplied the bulk of Lysimachos monetary needs, perhaps even until Lysimacus gained control of mints in Anatolia after Ipsus.
GB112855. Bronze unit, Price p. 133, P4; SNG ANS 998; Thompson 2 (Lysimachia mint, 306 - 300 B.C.); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Cop -, F, nice green patina, corrosion, weight 5,562 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right, wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male rider galloping right, ΛY to the left of lion forepart right below; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, as Satrap of Thrace, 323 - 305 B.C., Struck by Kassander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Lysimachos,| |as| |Satrap| |of| |Thrace,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Kassander||unit|NEW
This type was likely struck by Kassander at Amphipolis for Lysimachos, perhaps while Lysimachos was battling the Thracian tribes. With the support of Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, Kassander defeated Polyperchon, and declared himself the Macedonian regent in 317 B.C. Lysimachos was satrap in Thrace and some adjoining territory, an area without a royal mint. Lysimachos and Kassander were related by marriage and bound by mutual trust, respect, and unwavering friendship. Kassander likely supplied the bulk of Lysimachos monetary needs, perhaps even until Lysimacus gained control of mints in Anatolia after Ipsus.
GB112982. Bronze unit, Price p. 133, P4; SNG ANS 998; Thompson 2 (Lysimachia mint, 306 - 300 B.C.); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Cop -, gF, green patina, spots of corrosion, weight 5.202 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 125o, Amphipolis mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right, wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male rider galloping right, holding palm branch; bow lower left, ΛY to the left of lion forepart right below; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Probus started as a simple soldier but advanced to general and was declared emperor after the death of Tacitus. Florian's murder left him as undisputed ruler. His leadership brought peace and prosperity but he was murdered by mutinous soldiers, enraged at being employed on public building projects.
RA111887. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 862, Cohen VI 655, SRCV III -, Hunter IV 303 var. (2nd officina), VF, much silvering remaining, weight 3.013 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse SOLI INVICTO (to the invincible sun god), Sol in a spread quadriga facing, radiate, cloak billowing out behind, raising right hand commanding sunrise, whip in left hand, KAΔ in exergue; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Islamic, Seljuqs of Rum, Suleiman (Sulayman) II b. Qilij Arslan, 1196 - 1204 A.D.

|Islamic|, |Islamic,| |Seljuqs| |of| |Rum,| |Suleiman| |(Sulayman)| |II| |b.| |Qilij| |Arslan,| |1196| |-| |1204| |A.D.||fals|
Suleiman ibn Qutulmish founded the Rum Sultanate, with its capital at Konya (Iconium to the Romans), after he defeated the Byzantine emperor Romanus IV in 1077 A.D. and overran much of Anatolia. "Rum" was the Persian name for Rome and the Seljuqs called Anatolia "Rum" because it was part of the Roman-Byzantine Empire for centuries. The Seljuks ruled in Anatolia independently until 1243, and thereafter until 1302 as vassals of the Mongol Ilkhans. It was the last surviving Seljuk territory.Seljuqs_of_Rum
IS98874. Bronze fals, Album 1205.2, Mitchiner WOI 963, F, flan flaw (pit) on reverse, edge cracks, weight 5.642 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 135o, Konya(?) mint, AH 595 - 600; obverse nimbate horseman right, mace in right over shoulder, star behind; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: al-sultan al-qahir / Suleiman Shah bin / Qilij Arslan; Arabic date in margin, no mint named (as always); $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00




  



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