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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Horse||View Options:  |  |  |   

Horses on Ancient Coins
Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Honos was the Roman god personifying honor. He was closely associated with Virtus, the goddess of manliness, or bravery, and the two are frequently depicted together. Honos is typically shown wearing a wreath of bay leaves, while Virtus is identified by her helmet.
SH95113. Silver denarius, RSC I 429, RIC I 313, BMCRE I 55, BnF I 196, Choice EF, attractive style, nice toning, well centered, banker's mark on cheek, thin flan cracks on reverse, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.894 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 90o, Italian (Rome?) mint, moneyer M. Durmius, 19 - 18 B.C.; obverse M DVRMIVS III VIR HONORI, bare head of Honos right, with idealized features of Augustus; reverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS, slow quadriga right, modius-shaped car, three grain ears on top, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira Sale, part 2 (10-11 Oct 1988), part of lot 2305; very rare; $1900.00 SALE |PRICE| $1700.00


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 385 - 380 B.C.

|Italy|, |Taras,| |Calabria,| |Italy,| |c.| |385| |-| |380| |B.C.|, |nomos|
Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nul|lified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
GS95128. Silver nomos, Fischer-Bossert 930, SNG ANS 1012, Vlasto 634, aEF, centered on a tight flan, die wear/damage, weight 7.805 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 385 - 380 B.C.; obverse horseman right, nude, circular shield on left arm, two couched spears in left hand, a third spear in his raised right hand, E-Π-A clockwise above, API below horse's belly; reverse Taras astride a dolphin left, kantharos in right, oar behind in left hand, KA upper left, TAPAΣ curving downward on right; from the CEB Collection; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $540.00


Eastern Celts, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Dachreiter" Type, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Eastern| |Celts,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |"Dachreiter"| |Type,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
Although the body and head of the horseman on the prototype drachm of Philip III of Macedonia have been replaced by an S-shaped line over three pellets, the horseman's leg can still be found on the side of the horse!
SH89462. Silver tetradrachm, Gbl OTA tf. 15, 170/4; Lanz 448, aVF, light toning, reverse slightly off center, light marks, weight 11.953 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse stylized horseman prancing left, rider's head and body reduced to an S-shaped line over three pellets, leg of horseman on side of the horse; $540.00 SALE |PRICE| $486.00


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Timoleon| |and| |the| |Third| |Democracy,| |c.| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |dilitron|
Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI95238. Silver dilitron, SNG ANS 518; SNG Cop 717; SNG Munchen 1126; BMC Sicily p. 186, 283; Weber 1644; HGC 2 1373 (R2), VF, well centered, very dark toning, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.226 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate Janiform female head, ΣYPAKOΣI-ΩN upward on left, two dolphins nose to nose on right; reverse horse galloping right, barley ear right above, N below; ex Forum (2018); rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.|, |trichalkon|
According to mythology, Larissa was founded by Acrisius, who was killed accidentally by his grandson, Perseus; the nymph Larissa was a daughter of the primordial man Pelasgu; Achilles was born at Larissa, and Hippocrates, the "Father of Medicine"; died there. Today, Larissa is the capital and largest city of the Thessaly region and an important commercial, agricultural, and industrial center of Greece.
GB92063. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly 1172.1 (same countermark), BCD Thessaly II 394.1 (same countermark), SNG Cop 147, Rogers 309, HGC 4 530 (S), BMC Thessaly -, VF, well centered, attractive dark patina, interesting countermark, some flatness of strike, edge crack, beveled obverse edge; c/m: VF, weight 11.952 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 300 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa right, monogram behind; countermark on cheek: spiked helmet with visor, neck and cheek guards in a c. 6mm oval punch; reverse cavalryman prancing right, wearing spiked helmet, couched lance in right hand, star upper left, ΛA-PI/ΣNΩN divided above and below; ex Numismatik Lanz Mnchen, auction 112 (25 Nov 2002), 193; scarce; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 440 - 400 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Kelenderis,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |440| |-| |400| |B.C.|, |stater|
Kelenderis was a port town, one of the oldest in Cilicia, described in Hellenistic and Roman sources as a small, but strong castle. The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills, there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts. The rider on the obverse may be Castor, who was not only a horse trainer but also the protector of sailors, an appropriate type for a port town.
GS94270. Silver stater, Celenderis Hoard 3 (O15/R15); SNG BnF 46; cf. BMC Cilicia p. 52, 10 (KEΛ); SNGvA 5617 (KEΛEN); SNG Cop -; SNG Levante -, gVF, toned, weight 10.832 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kelenderis (Aydincik, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 400 B.C.; obverse young man riding sideways on horse galloping left, nude, preparing to dismount, bridle in left hand on near side of horse, whip in left hand, A below before hind legs; reverse goat crouching left on solid exergue line, head turned looking back right, KEΛEN over ivy spray with leaf and berries, all in a shallow round incuse; ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 77 (5 May 2019), lot 304; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 5th Century B.C.

|Archaic| |Origins|, |Kelenderis,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |5th| |Century| |B.C.|, |obol|
The Gorgoneion was originally a horror-creating apotropaic pendant showing the Gorgon's facing head. It was worn by the Olympian deities Zeus and Athena as a protective pendant. It was also worn, among other godlike attributes, as a royal aegis by rulers of the Hellenistic age and later on the busts of Roman Emperors. In Greek mythology, the Gorgon was a terrifying female creature. The name derives from the Greek word gorgs, which means "dreadful." While descriptions of Gorgons vary across Greek literature, the term commonly refers to any of three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying visage that turned those who beheld it to stone. Traditionally, while two of the Gorgons were immortal, Stheno and Euryale, their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by the mythical demigod and hero Perseus. Gorgons were a popular image of Greek mythology, appearing in the earliest of written records of Ancient Greek religious beliefs such as those of Homer. Because of their legendary gaze, images of the Gorgons were put upon objects and buildings for protection. For example, an image of a Gorgon holds the primary location at the pediment of the temple at Corfu. It is the oldest stone pediment in Greece and is dated to c. 600 B.C.
SL95877. Silver obol, SNG BnF Cilicia 465 (uncertain mint), Weber 7521 (Forrer notes, "Sir H. Weber notes against this coin: 'Dr. Imhoof says, indubitably Kelenderis'." , NGC Choice VF, strike 3/5, surface 4/5 (5872605-020), in NGC plastic holder, weight 0.70 g, Kelenderis (Aydincik, Turkey) mint, c. 5th century B.C.; obverse facing gorgon head; reverse forepart of horse right, incuse square; NGC| Lookup; $250.00 SALE |PRICE| $225.00


Belgic Celts, Bellovaci, c. 100 - 57 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Belgic| |Celts,| |Bellovaci,| |c.| |100| |-| |57| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
The Bellovaci, among the most powerful and numerous of the Belgian tribes of north-eastern Gaul, were conquered by Julius Caesar in 57 B.C. The name survives today in the French city of Beauvais, called by the Romans Caesaromagus. The Bellovaci territory extended from modern Beauvais to the Oise River, along the coast. When Caesar learned the Bellovaci intended to conquer the territory of their Suessiones neighbors, he decided to oppose them and prove Roman superiority. The Bellovaci were surprised by the arrival of Roman troops but, despite his force of about 30,000 men, Caesar was intimidated by the size of the Bellovaci forces. Neither initiated battle. The Belgic warriors set traps in the woods for Roman foragers. Caesar called for reinforcements and built a bridge across a marsh to position his troops within range of the Bellovaci camp. The Bellovaci retreated and then attempted an ambush. Caesar learned of their plan and had reinforcements ready to attack, but the Bellovaci were defeated and their general Correus killed, even before he arrived. After the battle, the Bellovaci were impressed by Caesar's clemency but some of their leaders fled to Britain. Belgae_Map
CE92095. Bronze AE 16, cf. Delestre-Tache I 307, CCCBM III 1, Scheers Trait 601, De la Tour 7276, VF, attractive olive green patina, obverse off center, weight 2.676 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 270o, c. 100 - 57 B.C.; obverse figure running right, ornaments around; reverse human-headed horse galloping right, one large globule above and another below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; rare; $230.00 SALE |PRICE| $207.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 342 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |356| |-| |342| |B.C.|, |drachm|
When Larissa ceased minting the federal coins it shared with other Thessalian towns and adopted its own coinage in the late fifth century B.C., it chose local types for its coins. The obverse depicted the local fountain nymph Larissa, for whom the town was named, probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse depicted a horse in various poses.
GS95233. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly 1156, BCD Thessaly II 320, SNG Cop 123, aVF, attractive style, toned, porous, tiny edge crack, weight 5.612 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 135o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 342 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and simple necklace; reverse horse crouching right preparing to roll over, plant below, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; ex Forum (2013); $230.00 SALE |PRICE| $207.00


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

|Volusian|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RS93314. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 224(a) (R), RSC IV 2b, SRCV III 9738, Hunter III - (p. cviii), VF, attractive style, well centered, darkened bronze and turquoise encrustations, flan cracks, weight 2.800 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch mint, 252 A.D.; obverse IMP C V AF GAL VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, three pellets below; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), Trebonianus Gallus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, paludamentum flying behind, horse's right foreleg raised; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $220.00 SALE |PRICE| $198.00




  



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