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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Churches of Revelation||View Options:  |  |  |   

Churches of Revelation

The Book of Revelation discusses the churches of seven cities. This page lists some of our coins from those cities.

- Ephesus, Ionia (Revelation 2:1-7) - the church that had forsaken its first love (2:4).
- Smyrna, Ionia (Revelation 2:8-11) - the church that would suffer persecution (2:10).
- Pergamon, Mysia (Revelation 2:12-17) - the church that needed to repent (2:16).
- Thyatira, Lydia (Revelation 2:18-29) - the church that had a false prophetess (2:20).
- Sardis, Lydia (Revelation 3:1-6) - the church that had fallen asleep (3:2).
- Philadelphia, Lydia (Revelation 3:7-13) - the church that had endured patiently (3:10).
- Laodicea, Phrygia (Revelation 3:14-22) - the church with the lukewarm faith (3:16).


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

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Ex William Turner Collection. William Turner (1792 - 1867), British diplomat of the early 19th century, authored his interesting and opinionated Journal of a Tour in Levante (1820) describing his adventures in the area. This specimen was obtained by Turner in the course of his travels (1812 - 1817).

III:282 "..this morning I bought a few medals of the city [Pergamum] for which I could not close my bargain last night, but I was right in supposing that if I remained firm, the seller would yield on seeing me go off."
WT46627. Bronze AE 22, William Turner Collection 372 (this coin); SNG BnF 1866; SNG Cop 379; BMC Mysia p. 128, 149; Weber 5188; SGCV II 3976, F, weight 7.891 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Asklepios right, ΣEΛEYKOY below; reverse Π−EP/Γ−A/MHNΩN, eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Athena's bust is in fine style with more attention to detail than usual. For example, lines indicating Athena's hair are visible through the eye slits in the helmet (quite unusual for the type).
SH56812. Gold stater, Price 2633; MŁller Alexander 30, aEF, rev die wear, fine style, weight 8.597 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, wearing necklace and pendant earring; reverse AΛEΞAN∆[POY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, race torch left below wing, monogram off flan below right wing; a few small die breaks, lustrous fields, superb bust of Athena; SOLD


Lydian Kingdom, Kroisos, c. 561 - 546 B.C.

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The Lydian King Croesus minted the first silver and gold coins. He was famous for his extraordinary wealth, but after his defeat by Cyrus in 546 B.C. Lydia became a Persian satrapy. The Persian conquerors of Lydia continued to strike the same Croesus' silver half siglos and gold stater types. This coin is an early example issued under Croesus. We can tell it is an early example because the lion and the bull were struck separately, with one punch at a time. Later examples appear to have been struck with single punch only made to look like two separate punches.
GA33281. Silver siglos (half-stater), BMC Lydia p. 7, 45, pl. 1, 18; SNG Cop 456; SNG Kayhan 1024; SNG Ashmolean 762; SNGvA 2877; Rosen 663; SGCV II 3420, gVF, weight 5.375 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, probably Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 561 - 546 B.C.; obverse on the left, forepart of a roaring lion right, confronting, on the right, the forepart of a bull left; reverse two incuse square punches, of unequal size, side by side; SOLD


C. Cassius Longinus, Proconsul and Imperator, Committed Suicide in 42 B.C.

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Gaius Cassius Longinus (before 85 B.C. - October 42 B.C.) was a Roman senator, the prime mover in the conspiracy against Julius Caesar, and the brother in-law of Brutus.
SH68259. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1446, BMCRR East 79, RSC I 7, Crawford 500/1, Sydenham 219, EF, weight 4.033 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, struck near Smyrna, Ionia(?), mobile military mint, early 42 B.C.; obverse CēCASSIē IMP, tripod surmounted by cauldron and two laurel branches, fillet hanging from either side; reverse LENTVLVS / SPINT (moneyer L. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther), capis and lituus (emblems of the Augurate); ex CNG auction 312, lot 174; very rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes I - Darius III, c. 450 - 330 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH21693. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, group A, 27 (same reverse punch), SGCV II 4679, aEF, an excellent example of the type, weight 8.424 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 330 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse Oblong punch; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes I - Artaxerxes II, c. 450 - 375 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH12096. Gold daric, Carradice Type IV A (pl. XIII, 32); BMC Arabia pl. XXVI 9; SGCV II 4680, EF, weight 8.297 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 375 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, dagger in right hand, bow in left hand; reverse oblong punch; rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Lifetime issue!
SH32293. Gold stater, Price 2533, MŁller Alexander 293, VF, damaged obverse die, weight 8.605 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, griffin head to left; scarce; SOLD


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 625 - 546 B.C.

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According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85433. Electrum trite, Weidauer Series XVI 86, SNGvA 2869, SNG Kayhan 1013, Rosen 655, Boston MFA 1763, VF, banker's mark, some light scratches, weight 4.683 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 625 - 546 B.C; obverse Head of roaring lion right, with knob and rays atop snout; reverse two incuse squares; SOLD


Vespasian Junior, 95 - 96 A.D., Smyrna, Ionia

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Vespasian Junior was the son of Flavius Clemens, Domitian's cousin and co-consul in 95 A.D. He was renamed Vespasian Junior when he was designated as Domitian's successor.The only coins of Vespasian Junior are this type, struck at Smyrna Ionia.
SH62518. Orichalcum AE 17, RPC II 1028, BMC Ionia 319, VF, weight 2.322 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Smyrna (Izmir, Turkey) mint, 95 - 96 A.D.; obverse OYECΠACIANOC NEΩTEPOC, bare-headed bust of Vespasian the Younger right; reverse ΣMYPNAIΩN, Nike walking right, wreath in right hand, palm branch over left shoulder; very rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darios I - Xerxes II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH12099. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb A/B, SNG Cop 275, SGCV II 4679, Choice EF, weight 8.284 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, wearing crown and kidaris, a quiver at his shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse irregular approximately rectangular punch; SOLD




  




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Other coins that relate to the Book of Revelation include coins of Nero and coins of the Parthian kings with an archer reverse. Verses 13 and following are a symbolic reference to Parthians attacking Rome for its vile behavior in persecuting Christ's church. Parthians themselves aren't envisioned as doing the attacking, but the serve as a great image for the diabolical forces Revelation's author had in mind. Suetonius, in The Twelve Caesars, writes of a belief among the Romans after Nero's death that he hadn't really died but would be returning with the Parthians. Nero has been identified as the 666 of Revelation (his name in gematria equals 666). Verse 8 refers to the Parthians long hair, "They had hair like woman's hair." Verse 10 includes a subtle reference to Parthian archer-horseman and their perfected technique of the parting shots, shooting over the rear of their animal while feigning retreat, "They had tails like scorpions, with stingers." Verse 14 refers to the Parthian heartland across the Euphrates.



Catalog current as of Friday, November 22, 2019.
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Churches of Revelation