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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Asian Coins||View Options:  |  |  |   

Asian Coins

China, Xin Dynasty (Wang Mang's Interregnum), 9 - 23 A.D.

|China|, |China,| |Xin| |Dynasty| |(Wang| |Mang's| |Interregnum),| |9| |-| |23| |A.D.||10| |spades|
Wang Mang was a Han Dynasty official and consort kin who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin Dynasty, ruling 9-23 A.D. The Han dynasty was restored after his overthrow, and his rule marks the separation between the Western Han Dynasty (before Xin) and Eastern Han Dynasty (after Xin). Some historians have traditionally viewed Wang as a usurper, while others have portrayed him as a visionary and selfless social reformer. Though a learned Confucian scholar who sought to implement the harmonious society he saw in the classics, his efforts ended in chaos. In October 23 A.D., the capital Chang'an was attacked and the imperial palace ransacked. Wang Mang died in the battle. The Han dynasty was reestablished in 25 A.D. when Liu Xiu (Emperor Guangwu) took the throne.Wang_Mang
CH110913. Bronze 10 spades, Gratzer-Fishman C5.159, Hartill 9.30, EF, attractive patina, 58.4x23.8mm, weight 16.858 g, maximum diameter 58.4 mm, die axis 0o, 14 - 23 A.D.; obverse Hou Bu (money spade), square footed, holed, center line to hole; reverse center line to hole; scarce; $300.00 (303.00)


Kushan Empire, Kipunadha, c. 335 - 350 A.D.

|Kushan| |Empire|, |Kushan| |Empire,| |Kipunadha,| |c.| |335| |-| |350| |A.D.||denara|NEW
Kipunada was probably the last ruler of the Kushan Empire around 335-350. The beginning of his rule coincides with the invasion of the Sasanians as far as northwestern India. Kipunada was probably only a local ruler in the area of Taxila, in western Punjab.

Ardoxsho is the Iranic goddess of wealth. Analogies have been drawn with the Buddhism deity Hariti, Persian goddess Anahita, the Greek Tyche, the Roman Fortuna and the Hindu Shri.
WA110114. debased gold denara, ANS Kushan 1683 - 1687, Mitchiner ACW 3591, Gbl Kushan 596, aVF, highly debased, tight flan, weight 7.508 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 335 - 350 A.D.; obverse Kipunadha standing facing, head left wearing nimbus, diadem and conical hat, sacrificing over altar from right hand, trident in raised left hand, filleted trident to left, Brahmi inscriptions, KiPaNaDa right; reverse goddess Ardoxsho enthroned facing, nimbate, voluminous robe and long scarf, diadem wreath in extended right hand, cornucopia cradled in left arm; $200.00 (202.00)


China, Yan State, Ming Knife Money, 400 - 220 B.C.

|China|, |China,| |Yan| |State,| |Ming| |Knife| |Money,| |400| |-| |220| |B.C.||knife| |money|NEW
Ming knives are identified by a character that looks like an eye on the obverse. Traditionally this character has been identified as ming, hence the name for the type. Others identify the character as Yi. A mint for Ming knives was unearthed at Xiadu, to the south west of Beijing. This was the site of Yi, capital of the State of Yan from 360 B.C., so the reading of yi has found favor recently. Molds have also been discovered in Shandong. The coins have been found, often in great quantities, across much of northern China and even as far as Korea and Japan. A wide range of characters are found on the reverses. There are two different Ming knife shapes. The first, presumably the earlier, is curved like the pointed tip knives. The second has a straight blade and often a pronounced angled bend in the middle. This shape is known as qing, a chime stone. The alloy contains around 40% copper and they weigh around 16 grams.
CH110923. Bronze knife money, Hartill 4.42, Schjoth 51-61, Fisher 342, Paohua DCD 577, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 16.446 g, maximum diameter 139.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ming mint, 400 - 220 B.C.; obverse Ming (bright) or Yi; reverse Suo Wu (left five); $190.00 (191.90)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

|China|, |China,| |Northern| |Song| |Dynasty,| |Emperor| |Hui| |Zong,| |1101| |-| |1126| |A.D.||10| |cash|NEW
"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.

The slender gold script was the personal calligraphy style of the Emperor Hui Zong.
Huizong
CH110837. Bronze 10 cash, Gorny NS 33. Hartill 16.400, Schjoth 621, Fisher 1040, VF, attractive blue-green patina, weight 11.375 g, maximum diameter 34.71 mm, die axis 0o, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning tong bao, clockwise, slender gold script; reverse plain; $55.00 (55.55)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

|China|, |China,| |Warring| |States,| |Chu| |Kingdom,| |c.| |476| |-| |221| |B.C.,| |Ghost| |Face| |Money||cowrie|
This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH110832. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, VF, light deposits, edge chipping, weight 2.802 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $45.00 (45.45)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

|China|, |China,| |Warring| |States,| |Chu| |Kingdom,| |c.| |476| |-| |221| |B.C.,| |Ghost| |Face| |Money||cowrie|NEW
This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH110834. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, VF, earthen deposits, light edge chipping, weight 1.483 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $40.00 (40.40)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

|China|, |China,| |Warring| |States,| |Chu| |Kingdom,| |c.| |476| |-| |221| |B.C.,| |Ghost| |Face| |Money||cowrie|NEW
This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH110835. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, VF, earthen deposits, weight 1.987 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $40.00 (40.40)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

|China|, |China,| |Warring| |States,| |Chu| |Kingdom,| |c.| |476| |-| |221| |B.C.,| |Ghost| |Face| |Money||cowrie|NEW
This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH110836. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, VF, earthen deposits, roughness, weight 2.393 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $40.00 (40.40)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

|China|, |China,| |Warring| |States,| |Chu| |Kingdom,| |c.| |476| |-| |221| |B.C.,| |Ghost| |Face| |Money||cowrie|NEW
This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH110833. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, aVF, earthen deposits, weight 2.020 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $35.00 (35.35)


China, Jin Dynasty, Emperor Wan Yan Liang, 1149 - 1161 A.D.

|China|, |China,| |Jin| |Dynasty,| |Emperor| |Wan| |Yan| |Liang,| |1149| |-| |1161| |A.D.||1| |cash|
The Jin dynasty, the Great Jin, ruled north eastern China 1115 to 1234. Its name is sometimes written as Kin, Jurchen Jin or Jinn to differentiate it from an earlier Chinese dynasty with the same name. Its rulers were Jurchen. After vanquishing the Liao, the Jin launched an over one hundred-year struggle against the Song dynasty, in southern China. Over the course of their rule, the Jurchens of Jin adapted to Chinese customs. They fortified the Great Wall but the Mongols invaded under Genghis Khan in 1211 and inflicted catastrophic defeats. The Jin seemed to suffer a never-ending wave of defeats, revolts, defections, and coups, but proved tenacious. The Jin finally succumbed to Mongol conquest 23 years later in 1234.Great_Jin
CH110838. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 18.40, Schjoth 1083, Fisher 1637, VF, colorful patina, earthen deposits, rough hole, weight 3.707 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1158 - 1161 A.D.; obverse Zheng Long yuan bao, 4 stroke Zheng; reverse plain; scarce; $30.00 (30.30)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, January 27, 2023.
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