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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Geography| ▸ |Britain||View Options:  |  |  |   

Britain (Mints & Types)

Britain is a very popular collecting theme, not surprisingly, it is most popular with British collectors. The theme usually includes coins struck in Britain, coins related to historical events in Britain, and coins depicting Britannia or other types related to Britain.

Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Coin| |Hoards| |From| |Roman| |Britain| |Volume| |XI|
The eleventh volume, is dedicated to finds of Roman hoards from the early imperial period (with terminal dates up to AD 235) discovered between 1997 and 2001. The highlight of the volume is the Shapwick Villa (Somerset) hoard of over 9,000 denarii, the largest hoard of its kind from Britain to be fully published. It is complemented by an important essay on hoards of the Severan period from Britain by Richard Abdy and Roger Bland.
BK10551. Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI edited by Richard Abdy, Ian Leins, and Jonathan Williams, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No. 36, 2002, 223 pages, 10 plates, new, shelf-worn, priced at FORVM's cost!; $30.00 SALE PRICE $25.00


Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453

|France|, |Anglo-Gallic,| |Henry| |VI| |de| |Lancastre,| |King| |of| |France| |and| |England,| |1422| |-| |1453||petit| |blanc|
Henry VI was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453. The only child of Henry V, he succeeded to the English throne at the age of nine months upon his father's death, and succeeded to the French throne on the death of his grandfather, Charles VI, shortly afterwards. He is the only English monarch to also have been crowned King of France, as Henry II, in 1431.
WO99273. Silver petit blanc, Elias 292 (R), Duplessy I 446, Ciani 603, SCBC-SII 8167, Lafaurie 450, aVF, light deposits, scratches, weight 0.996 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 45o, crown mintmark, Paris mint, 1422 - 1436; obverse (crown) HEN-RICVS: - REX (King Henry, triple pellet stop), shields of France (on left) and England (on right), side by side; reverse (crown) SIT: nOmE: DnI: BEHEDICTV' (Blessed be the name of the Lord), Latin cross, h - R (Henricus Rex) across lower half of field; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; rare; $430.00 (408.50)


Great Britain, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |Victoria,| |20| |June| |1837| |-| |22| |January| |1901
||crown|NEW
Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died leaving no legitimate, surviving male children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian era. The inscription "Decus et Tutamen" can be translated to mean both "glory and defense" or "an ornament and a safeguard." The inscription was intended to both enhance the design of the coin and protected it against clipping.
UK99734. Silver crown, SCBC 3882, SCWC KM 741, gF, toned, light scratches and marks; DECUS ET PUTAMEN ANNO REGNI VIII ✿ (glory and defense in the 8th regnal year) on edge, weight 27.981 g, maximum diameter 38.0 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1845; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA (Victoria, by the grace of God), young head left, two plain bands around hair, 1845 below; reverse BRITANNIARUM REGINA FID : DEF : (Queen of the British Territories, Defender of the Faith), crowned quartered shield of Royal Arms (England 1st and 4th quarters, Scotland 2nd, and Ireland 3rd), surrounded by laurel wreath open at the top and tied with a ribbon at the bottom; united rose, thistle, and shamrock below; $250.00 (237.50)


Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453

|France|, |Anglo-Gallic,| |Henry| |VI| |de| |Lancastre,| |King| |of| |France| |and| |England,| |1422| |-| |1453||grand| |blanc| |aux| |cus|
In 1422, the year old king of England inherited the French throne from his mad grandfather Charles VI of France; the iconography of this type represents the unification of the two nations. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.
UK99276. Silver grand blanc aux cus, Elias 288, Duplessy 445, Ciani 602, Lafaurie 449, SCBC-SII 8166, VF, toning, marks, weight 3.135 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, lis mintmark, St L mint, 1422; obverse ⚜ FRANCORVm: ET: ANGLIE: REX (King of France and England), shields of France (on left) and England (on right), side by side, hERICVS above; reverse ⚜ SIT: nOmEN: DnI: BENEDICTV (Blessed be the name of the Lord), Latin cross, fleur-de-lis to left, leopard left on right, hERICVS on a line below; $240.00 (228.00)


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||sixpence|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98543. Silver sixpence, SCBC 3814, SCWC KM 691, AU, cleaned, weight 2.814 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1825; obverse GEORGIUS IIII D:G: BRITANNIAR: REX: F: D:, Laureate head left, tiny B.P. below (engraver Benedetto Pistrucci); reverse HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE (shame on him who thinks evil of it - the motto of the Order of the Garter), crowned coat of arms in garter, ANNO 1825 below; $150.00 (142.50)


Great Britain, George III, 25 October 1760 - 29 January 1820,

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |III,| |25| |October| |1760| |-| |29| |January| |1820,||3| |shilling|NEW
Bank Tokens are silver coins that were issued by the Bank of England for a brief time during the reign of George III. They filled a desperate need for coins which had not been issued in any significant quantity for many years. They were issued as 1/6d (One Shilling and Sixpence) and 3/- (Three Shillings).
UK99735. Silver 3 shilling, SCBC 3770, SCWC KM Tn5, VF, light toning, light scratches and marks, weight 14.652 g, maximum diameter 34.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1814; obverse GEORGIUS III DEI GRATIA REX (George III, by the Grace of God, King), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse BANK / TOKEN / 3 SHILL. / 1814, in four lines within wreath of oak and olive; $150.00 (142.50)


Great Britain, George III, 25 October 1760 - 29 January 1820

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |III,| |25| |October| |1760| |-| |29| |January| |1820||shilling|NEW
The long reverse legend abbreviates Latin meaning, "King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Duke of Brunswick and Lueneburg, Arch-Treasurer and Elector." George III was the third British monarch of the House of Hanover. Unlike his two predecessors, he was born in Britain, spoke English as his first language, and never visited Hanover. His life and reign were longer than any other British monarch before him. Early in his reign, he defeated France in the Seven Years' War, becoming the dominant power in N. America and India. However, many of Britain's American colonies were soon lost to independence. Britain defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Late in life, George III suffered from mental illness. His eldest son, George, Prince of Wales, ruled as regent and later succeeded his father as George IV.
UK99732. Silver shilling, SCBC 3743, SCWC KM 607.1, VF, light toning, scratches and marks, edge obliquely milled, weight 2.980 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1787; obverse GEORGIVSIIIDEIGRATIA (George III, by the grace of God), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MBFETHREXFDBETLDSRIATETE 1787, shields of Ireland, France, Hanover (without seme of hearts) and Great Britain in a cruciform arrangement, the Order of the Garter star in the center, a crown in each angle; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 19, (26 Feb 2022), lot 4162 (part of); $140.00 (133.00)


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830, For Use in Malta

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830,| |For| |Use| |in| |Malta||1/3| |farthing|
George IV was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later. He had already been serving as Prince Regent since 5 February 1811, during his father's final mental illness. He led an extravagant lifestyle that contributed to the fashions of the Regency era. He was a patron of new forms of leisure, style and taste. He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace. He commissioned Jeffry Wyatville to rebuild Windsor Castle.
UK98539. Bronze 1/3 farthing, SCBC 3827, SCWC KM 703, EF, small scratches and marks, weight 1.446 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1st issue, 1827; obverse GEORGIUS IV DEI GRATIA 1827, Laureate head left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF, Britannia seated right, floral pattern in exergue; $120.00 (114.00)


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||farthing|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98540. Copper farthing, Peck 1414, SCBC 3822, SCWC KM 677, AU, tiny scratches and marks, weight 4.732 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1st issue, 1822; obverse GEORGIUS IIII DEI GRATIA (George IV, by the grace of God), laureate and draped bust left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of The British territories, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, arm on shield, holding laurel branch and trident, 1822 below; $120.00 (114.00)


Great Britain, William IV, 26 June 1830 - 20 June 1837

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |William| |IV,| |26| |June| |1830| |-| |20| |June| |1837||farthing|
William IV was the third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV, he was the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover. He was nicknamed the "Sailor King" because he served in the Royal Navy in his youth. He served in North America and the Caribbean. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne at 64 years old. His reign saw reforms: the poor law was updated, child labor restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all the Empire, and the electoral system was reformed. Although William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a prime minister contrary to the will of Parliament. He granted his German kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution. At the time of his death, William had no surviving legitimate children, but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for twenty years. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece, Victoria, and in Hanover by his brother, Ernest Augustus.
UK98546. Copper farthing, SCBC 3848, SCWC KM 705, gVF, light stains, small scratches and marks, weight 4.796 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1831; obverse GULIELMUS IIII DEI GRATIA (William the 4th, by the Grace of God), bare head right, incuse W.W (engraver William Wyon) on base of neck truncation, 1831 below; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of the Britains, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, resting right hand on shield at side, incuse line on saltire, trident in left hand, rose below; $100.00 (95.00)




  



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