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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Numismatics| ▸ |Barbaric & Imitative||View Options:  |  |  | 

Barbaric and Imitative Coins
Imitative Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, c. 970 - 980 A.D.

|Anonymous| |Folles|, |Imitative| |Byzantine| |Anonymous| |Follis| |of| |Christ,| |c.| |970| |-| |980| |A.D.||anonymous| |follis|
Of this type of imitative, Lampinen writes, "The second phase of Balkan coinage production goes into high gear with the introduction of the anonymous follis series during the reign of John I (969 - 976). The explicit Christian imagery must have struck a chord with the recently converted Balkan masses because the official mint issues were accompanied by a fair quantity of copies, to meet the excess demand. These Christian issues would also be the prototypes for the initial coinage of several medieval Christian states, such as the first Crusader issues of Edessa and Antioch, medieval Armenia and distant Georgia in the Caucasus."
BZ89911. Bronze anonymous follis, See Lampinen Imitative p. 154 for a similar imitative; for the likely prototype cf. official Byzantine anonymous class A1 folles; SBCV 1793, VF, green patina, double struck, porous, crude and blundered, weight 6.880 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, unofficial (Balkan?) mint, c. 970 - 980 A.D.; obverse facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, blundered imitation of the abbreviation: IC - XC (Greek: Ihsoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse blundered inscription imitating: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings); rare this crude; $135.00 (€110.70)
 


Celts, Danube Region, c. 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Alexander or Philip III of Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celts,| |Danube| |Region,| |c.| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Alexander| |or| |Philip| |III| |of| |Macedonia||drachm|
At one time, many decades ago, it was popular to varnish collectible coins to "protect" them. Although we are not entirely certain, it appears the encrustation on this coin is old varnish.
CE95911. Silver drachm, CCCBM I 212, Lanz 948, Forrer I 339, Dessewffy 534, Göbl OTA 595, F, slightly off center, light scratches, old varnish(?) encrustation, weight 2.436 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (€82.00)
 


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 429 - 534 A.D.

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Vandal| |Kingdom,| |North| |Africa,| |429| |-| |534| |A.D.||AE| |9|
In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Convicted of treason, rather than surrender for execution, the Roman general Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals ruled North Africa until the Byzantine Romans recaptured it in 534.
ME93386. Bronze AE 9, cf. Wroth BMCV 188, pl. iv, 39, F, earthen encrusted, weight 0.805 g, maximum diameter 8.5 mm, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 429 - 534 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust right; reverse cross (in wreath?); $90.00 (€73.80)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Unofficial?), c. 91 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous| |(Unofficial?),| |c.| |91| |B.C.||quadrans|
Russo suspects this type may be unofficial because, despite the attractive style, the prow does not include the usual features found on most coins of the period.
RR88352. Copper quadrans, Russo RBW 1244 (unofficial?), Crawford 339/4a, Sydenham 679c, BMCRR Rome 2208, SRCV I 1195, VF, porous, rough, edge splits, weight 2.114 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, apotropaic on side, ROMA above, three pellets below; $65.00 (€53.30)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Roman| |Macedonia,| |"Thasian"| |Type,| |c.| |148| |-| |80| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
SH56039. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, 771 var. (O AE3 / R -, cf. 601), monogram 6; SNG Cop 1040 ff., Choice gVF, weight 16.498 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; SOLD


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Geto-Dacian,| |Roman| |Republic| |Imitative,| |c.| |82| |B.C.| |-| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||denarius| |serratus|
In ancient Greek and Roman writing Dacus (plural Daci) and Geta (plural Getae) were interchangeable names for tribes of the Dacia region, distinct from but influenced by and possibly related the Thracians and Celts. Modern historians prefer to use the name Geto-Dacians.
CE68430. Silver denarius serratus, cf. Davis C52 and M166; for the Rome mint, C. Mamilius Limetanus, 82 B.C., prototype see: SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, gVF, weight 3.846 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 135o, tribal mint, c. 82 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses (Odysseus) walking right, greeted by his dog Argos, staff in left hand, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD


Kingdom of Gepidia, c. 493 - 518 A.D., In the Name of Anastasius

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Kingdom| |of| |Gepidia,| |c.| |493| |-| |518| |A.D.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Anastasius||quarter| |siliqua|
Long attributed to the Ostrogoths, Metlich corrected attribution of this type to Gepidia. The Gepids were an East Germanic tribe, closely related to the Goths, first recorded in the 6th-century as having been allied with Goths invading Dacia in c. 260. In the 4th century, they were under the hegemony of the Hunnic Empire. Under King Ardaric, the Gepids united with other Germanic tribes and defeated the Huns at the Battle of Nedao in 454. The Gepids then founded the Kingdom of Gepidia, which reached its zenith of power after 537, settling around Singidunum (today's Belgrade). For a short time, Sirmium (today's Sremska Mitrovica) was the center of the Gepid State. In 552 the Gepids suffered a disastrous defeat to Alboin, king of the Lombards, after which Alboin had a drinking cup made from the skull of the Gepid King Cunimund. Remnants of the Gepids were conquered by the Avars later in the 6th century. Erythrai_amphitheater
BZ86482. Silver quarter siliqua, Hahn MIB I 46 (Theoderic), Kraus 63 - 64 (Theoderic), VF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, toned, light marks, small edge crack, weight 0.885 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, c. 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse D N ANASTASIVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Anastasius (Byzantine Emperor, 11 Apr 491 - 1 Jul 518) right; reverse INVIT-A ROMA D M, (monogram of Ostrogothic King Theoderic, 454 - 30 Aug 526), cross above and star below, both dividing legend; SOLD


Ostrogoths, Athalaric, 31 August 526 - 2 October 534, In the Name of Byzantine Empire, Justinian I

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Ostrogoths,| |Athalaric,| |31| |August| |526| |-| |2| |October| |534,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justinian| |I||AE| |4|
BZ40599. Bronze AE 4, Wroth BMCV p. 67, 52, gF, weight 1.048 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, obverse JVST-INIANII (blundered), diademed and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right; reverse monogram of Athalaric in wreath; SOLD







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