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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military| ▸ |Nike or Victory||View Options:  |  |  |   

Nike or Victory on Ancient Coins

Victoria or Nike, the Winged Goddess of Victory, personifies victory. She was described variously in different myths as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus. According to classical (later) myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Nike flew around battlefields rewarding the victors with glory and fame, symbolized by a wreath of laurel leaves. Victory or Nike is one of the most common figures on Greek and Roman coins.

Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

|Arcadius|, |Arcadius,| |19| |January| |383| |-| |1| |May| |408| |A.D.||solidus|NEW
In 402, Germanic settlers laid siege to Milan. Honorius transferred the capital of the Western Empire from Milan to Ravenna. General Stilicho recalled troops from the frontiers of the Empire to defend Italy. On April 6 he defeated the Visigoths at the Battle of Pollentia. The Visigoths left Italy for Illyricum after Stilicho defeated them at the Battle of Verona in June 403.
SH110673. Gold solidus, RIC IX p. 84, 35(b) & RIC X Honorius p. 318, 1205(a); DOCLR 265; Depeyrot p. 171, 16/1; Hunter V p. 467, 8; SRCV V 20724, Choice EF, well centered and struck, flow lines, light scratches/bumps, weight 4.456 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 395 - 402 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Arcadius standing right, wearing military garb, standard in right hand, Victory on globe offering wreath in left hand, left foot treading on thigh of bound bearded captive seated on the ground left with legs crossed, M left, D right, COMOB in exergue; $2200.00 (2222.00) ON RESERVE


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

|Galba|, |Galba,| |3| |April| |68| |-| |15| |January| |69| |A.D.||sestertius|NEW
This obverse die is published in Kraay's, The Aes Coinage of Galba, combined only with an AVGVSTA, Livia seated left reverse. After an extensive search of references and online, this is the only specimen of this type known to FORVM.
RB110265. Orichalcum sestertius, Apparently unpublished, Kraay Galba - (officina B, A76/-), RIC I -, Cohen I -, BnF III -, OCRE -, SRCV I -, BMCRE I -, aVF, nice brown patina, light bumps and marks, holed and filled, weight 23.058 g, maximum diameter 35.6 mm, die axis 210o, officina B, Rome mint, 68 A.D.; obverse IMP SER GALBA CAE AVG TR P, oak-wreathed head right; reverse Victory alighting right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; extremely rare; $500.00 (505.00) ON RESERVE


Byzantine Empire, Justin I, 10 July 518 - 1 August 527 A.D.

|Justin| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |I,| |10| |July| |518| |-| |1| |August| |527| |A.D.||tremissis|NEW
Of Macedonian peasant origin, Justin I rose through the ranks of the military and was proclaimed emperor by the army on 10 July 518 A.D. He was uneducated, but intelligent enough to rely upon the policy advice of his brilliant nephew, Justinian I.
SH110983. Gold tremissis, Morrisson BnF I 2/Cp/AV/17 (also with M resembling H), DOC I 4, Wroth BMC 11, Sommer 2.4, Hahn MIB I 4, SBCV 58, EF, lustrous, double struck, graffito, weight 1.482 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 491 - 518 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTI-NVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A graffito in right field; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTORH (the victory of the Emperor), Victory advancing right, head left, holding wreath and globus cruciger, star right, CONOB in exergue; ex FORVM 2011; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||as|NEW
The shield held by Victory is the golden shield that was dedicated to Augustus by the Senate and Roman People (S. P. Q. R.) in recognition of his classic, cardinal virtues. By placing the shield and Victory on his coin, Nero was claiming these same virtues were part of his regime. -- Roman History from Coins by Michael Grant
RB110365. Copper as, RIC I 312, BMCRE I 241, Mac Dowall WCN 285, BnF II 399, Hunter I 91, Cohen I 288, SRCV I 1976, F, dark green patina, broad flan, obv. slightly off center, weight 9.081 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right; reverse Victory flying left holding shield inscribed S P Q R (Senatus Populusque Romanus - the Senate and the Roman people), S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00 ON RESERVE


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
On 30 April 313, Licinius defeated his rival Maximinus II at the Battle of Tzirallum and became emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire. Maximinus fled to Nicomedia and committed suicide.
RT110135. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 17 (R1), SRCV IV 15212, Cohen VII 66, Hunter V 73 var. (2nd officina), Choice EF, excellent centering on a broad flan, dark chocolate patina, weight 3.943 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, E right, SIS in exergue; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |37|NEW
The reverse is copied from Judaea Capta types struck under the Flavian Dynasty. It may not refer to Judaea on this coin, but in ancient times the date palm was a symbol of Judaea. Date cultivation declined in Judea after the Roman period, especially during the Crusades, and completely collapsed due to climate change around the 14th century. The Judean Date Palm fell extinct. Excavations at Herod the Great's palace on Masada in 1963-1965 uncovered a cache of date palm seeds preserved in an ancient jar. Radiocarbon dating confirmed the seeds were from 155 B.C. to 64 A.D. In 2005, three of the seeds were planted. Eight weeks later one of the seeds sprouted. The palm, a male, named Methuselah, was grown from the oldest known successfully germinated tree seed. After that success, additional palms from were sprouted from the seeds found at Masada. A female, Hannah, was pollinated by Methuselah and the Judean Date Palm has been recovered.
RP110621. Bronze AE 37, Karwiese 5 p. 117, 513; Mionnet III p. 107, 349; BMC Ionia - ; SNG Cop - ; SNGvA -; RPC Online -, aF, well centered on a very large flan, weight 21.089 g, maximum diameter 36.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, Laureate and cuirassed bust right, medusa on cuirass, paludamentum on left shoulder; reverse EΦECIΩN TPIC NEΩKOPΩN (Ephesos three neokorie), Nike standing right, affixing shield to trunk of palm tree; first specimen of this BIG 36.8 mm type handled by FORVM; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, c. 270 - 250 B.C.

|Italy|, |Neapolis,| |Campania,| |Italy,| |c.| |270| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |21|NEW
Before it was refounded as Neapolis (meaning "new city"), Naples was called Parthenope, named for the siren Parthenope, the daughter of the river-god Achelous and the Muse Terpsichore. Parthenope cast herself into the sea and drowned when her songs failed to entice Odysseus. Her body washed ashore at Naples. When people from the city of Cumae settled there, they named their city Parthenope in her honor. Roman myth tells a different tale, in which a centaur called Vesuvius was enamored with Parthenope. In jealousy, Zeus turned the centaur into a volcano and Parthenope into the city of Naples. Thwarted in his desire, Vesuvius's anger is manifested in the mountain's frequent eruptions.
GI110559. Bronze AE 21, Potamikon 333, Taliercio IIIa.10, HN Italy 589; BMC Italy p. 115, 219, SNG Cop 505, Sambon 658, VF, irregular flan shape typical for the type with remnants of casting sprues, nice jade green patina, light corrosion, weight 5.763 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 135o, Campania mint, c. 270 - 250 B.C.; obverse NEOΠOΛITΩN, laureate head of Apollo left, long wavy hair, E behind; reverse river-god Acheloios Sebethos, as a man-faced bull, standing right, head turned facing, being crowned by Nike who flies right above, MB monogram below, possibly IΣ in exergue (off flan); $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - Early October 404 A.D., Wife of Arcadius

|Eudoxia|, |Eudoxia,| |Augusta| |9| |January| |400| |-| |Early| |October| |404| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Arcadius||centenionalis|
The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL110194. Bronze centenionalis, Hunter V 4 (also 3rd officina), RIC X Arcadius 104 (S), LRBC II 2800, DOCLR 288, SRCV V 20895, VF, dark green patina, earthen encrustation, weight 3.216 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 135o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right on cuirass, inscribing Christogram on shield resting on cippus, ANTΓ in exergue; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
In 320 A.D., Licinius reneged on the religious freedom promised by the Edict of Milan, and began a new persecution of Christians in the Eastern Roman Empire. He destroyed churches, imprisoned Christians and confiscated their property.
RL99315. Billon follis, RIC VII Nicomedia 24 (R2), SRCV IV 15236, Cohen VII 116, Hunter V 138 ff. var. (officina), Choice gVF, full legends, traces of silvering, flow lines, light marks, tiny encrustations, weight 3.377 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 330o, 7th officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 317 - 320 A.D.; obverse IMP LICI-NIVS AVG, laureate consular bust left, mappa in right hand, globe and scepter in left hand; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jove the protector of the two Emperors), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter in left hand, palm frond left, Z right, SMN in exergue; from a private collector in New Jersey; scarce; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Eumeneia, Phrygia

|Eumeneia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia||AE| |26|
Eumenea, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP110014. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online IV-2 T1989; BMC Phrygia p. 219, 56; SNGvA 3594; SNG Leypold II 1540; Weber 7096; SNG Tbingen 4014; SNG Cop -, F, rough, black patina, weight 10.205 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, obverse AVTO KAICA ANTΩNEINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, aegis on left shoulder, seen from the front; reverse EVMENEΩN AXAIΩN, hump-backed bull walking left, Nike walking left on far side of bull, wearing chiton, grasping bull's left horn and guiding bull with left hand, brandishing knife to sacrifice bull in right hand; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00




  



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REFERENCES|

Imhoof-Blumer, F. "Die Flgelgestalten der Athena und Nike auf Mnzen" in NZ III (1871)., pp. 1 - 50.
Marest-Caffey, L. "Seleukos I's Victory Coinage of Susa Revisited: A Die Study and Commentary" in AJN 28 (2016).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 31, 2023.
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