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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military||View Options:  |  |  |   

Military, Combat & Arms on Ancient Coins
Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||aureus|NEW
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SL110372. Gold aureus, RIC II-1 1; BMCRE I 31; SRCV I 2252, Cohen 1 225, Hunter I 16, NGC F 5/5 - 3/5 (5771211-001), weight 7.13 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse Jewess captive seated right in attitude of mourning, knees drawn up, head resting on left hand propped up on knees, trophy of captured arms behind her includes helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shields, and greaves, IVDAEA in exergue; first example of this type handled by Forum; NGC| Lookup; $9400.00 SALE PRICE $8460.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||denarius|
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SH99749. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 2; Hendin 6509; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; Hunter I 18; SRCV I 2296, gVF, toned, excellent portrait, obverse off center, die wear, edge crack, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse Jewess captive seated right in attitude of mourning beside a trophy of captured arms behind her, IVDAEA in exergue; ex Jesus Vico auction 161 (21 Apr 2022), lot 419; $700.00 SALE PRICE $630.00


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit

|Galba|, |Galba,| |3| |April| |68| |-| |15| |January| |69| |A.D.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||denarius|
This coin is dedicated to Rome reborn, presumably due to the leadership of Galba. To Galba it seems rebirth primary concerned an attempt to restore state finances. To this end he undertook a number of unpopular measures, the most dangerous was his refusal to pay the praetorians the reward promised to them in his name. Galba scorned the notion that soldiers should be "bribed" for their loyalty. According to the historian Suetonius, Galba levied massive taxes against areas that were slow to receive him as emperor.
RS99191. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC I 43, BMCRE I 180, RSC II 211, Hunter I 68, SRCV I 2095 (official, solid silver, Tarraco mint, Apr - late 68 A.D., minor variations), VF, toned, small core exposures, scratches, bumps, weight 2.846 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial, counterfeiter's mint, c. April 68 - 69 A.D.; obverse IMPERATO (sic) GALBA, laureate head right, globe at the point of neck; reverse ROMA RENASCENS (Rome Reborn), Roma advancing right, wearing helmet and military garb, Victory on globe presenting wreath in right hand, transverse spear in left hand; ex CNG e-auction 500 (22 Sep 2021), 735 (part of); ex Mercury Group Collection, ex Thomas Cederlind (20 Nov 2002) ; $490.00 SALE PRICE $441.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||sestertius|
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SH98839. Orichalcum sestertius, BnF II 490; Hendin 6530 (S); RIC II 159; BMCRE II p. 115, 532 ff., F, centered, rough, corrosion and pitting, weight 24.234 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate bust right; reverse IVDAEA CAPTA, date palm tree in center, male captive on left standing right with hands bound behind his back, Jewess on right sitting right on cuirass propping her head with her left hand in attitude of mourning, shields flanking them, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from an Israeli collection, ex Elsen auction 143 (7 Dec 2019), lot 376; scarce; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

|Postumus|, |Gallic| |Empire,| |Postumus,| |Summer| |260| |-| |Spring| |269| |A.D.||double| |sestertius|
This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance. Unfortunately for Postumus, Fides is only an imaginary goddess, his disgruntled troops killed him after he refused to allow them to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz, Germany).
RB98102. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC V-2 123, Cohen VI 74, Bastien Postume 77, Mairat 189, Hunter IV 101, SRCV III 11040, gF, obverse a little off center, parts of legends weak/unstruck, minor edge split, minor porosity, weight 18.031 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, France) mint, 3rd bronze emission, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse FIDES MILITVM (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides Militum standing facing, head left, flanked by two signum, one in each hand; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Hadrian, 11 August 11FORVM Hadrian 117-138 AD Silver Denarius7 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |11FORVM| |Hadrian| |117-138| |AD| |Silver| |Denarius7| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RS99605. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 722, RIC II 161, RSC II 349, BMCRE III 361, SRCV II 3472, Hunter II 140, SRCV II 3471, Strack 175, aEF, nice portrait, attractive toning, choice obverse, scratches, areas of slight porosity, edge cracks, weight 2.758 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Roma standing left, wearing helmet and military dress, Victory in right hand, short spear in left hand; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 95 (13 April 2022), lot 997; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, c. 49 - 95 A.D., for Domitian

|Agrippa| |II|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |Agrippa| |II,| |c.| |49| |-| |95| |A.D.,| |for| |Domitian||full| |unit|
We use the dating provided by RPC Online, which adopts 60/61 A.D. for year 1 of the era used by Agrippa II. This solves a number of issues with previous dating schemes, but adds the oddity of a large number of issues of posthumous coinage for Vespasian and Titus. This coin struck for Titus, for example; dated year 30 using this era is 89/90 A.D. Titus died in 81 B.C.
JD98848. Bronze full unit, Hendin 6328 (RR); RPC Online II 2296; BMC Palestine p. 243, 56; SNG ANS 315; Meshorer TJC 179; Sofaer p. 268 & pl. 218, 260, gF, well centered, earthen encrustation, edge split, weight 10.858 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Paneas (Banias, Golan Heights) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA ∆OMITIA KAICAP A ΓEPMANI (Emperor Domitian Caesar Germanicus), laureate head of Titus right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing slightly left, head left, stalks of barley in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ETOY - EΛ BA / AΓPI-ΠΠA (year 35, King Agrippa) in two lines divided across the field below center; from an Israeli collection; rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|
Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius.
JD98809. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6377; Meshorer TJC 340; Sofaer 59; BMC Palestine p. 264, 21; RPC I 4971, gF, near full legends, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, marks, obv. edge beveled, weight 2.984 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, under Nero, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two crossed oblong shields with two crossed spears on far side; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) in two divided lines flanking trunk; from an Israeli collection; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Judaea Capta, Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |18|
This Judaea Capta type was minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. Caesarea, built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 B.C., was named to flatter Augustus Caesar. It was the capital of the Roman Iudaea province and the residence of the Roman procurators and governors including Pontius Pilatus. In 66 A.D., the desecration of the local synagogue led to the disastrous Jewish revolt. After the revolt was suppressed, 2500 Jewish captives were slaughtered at Caesarea in Gladiatorial games held by Titus to celebrate his victory. Today, Caesarea's ruins lie on Israel's Mediterranean coast about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of Pyrgos Stratonos ("Straton's Tower").
JD99070. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2306, Hendin 6483, Meshorer TJC 393, Meshorer AJC 8, SNG ANS 495, Sofaer 30, F, red-brown patina, highlighting earthen deposits, rough, a little off center, weight 5.210 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 81 - 82 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG GERMANICVS, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Nike (Victory) in flowing gown advances left, wreath tied with ribbon in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left hand; ex Savoca auction 118 (21 Nov 2021), lot 393; from the Tareq Hani collection; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zabinas, 128 - 122 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |II| |Zabinas,| |128| |-| |122| |B.C.||unit|
Zabinas claimed to be an adoptive son of Antiochus VII, but may have been the son of an Egyptian merchant. He was used as a pawn by the Egyptian king Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon). Zabinas managed to defeat Demetrius II and thereafter ruled parts of Syria, but soon ran out of Egyptian support and was defeated by Demetrius' son Antiochus VIII Grypus. As a last resort, Zabinas plundered the temples of Antioch. He is said to have joked about melting down a statuette of the goddess of victory, Nike, which was held in the hand of a Zeus statue, saying "Zeus has given me Victory." Enraged by his impiety, the Antiochenes expelled Zabinas, who was captured and executed soon after. "Zabinas" is a derogatory name meaning "the bought one," implying he was Ptolemy's slave.
GY98892. Bronze unit, Houghton-Lorber II 2231(1)d var. (controls inner left), HGC 9 1162, aVF, highlighting earthen deposits, centered, shallow pit on rev., edge cracks, obv. edge beveled, weight 6.707 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 126 - 125 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander II right, wearing lion-scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike walking left, wreath extended in right hand, palm-branch over shoulder in left hand, over palm frond (controls) outer left; the only specimen known to FORVM with controls outer left vice inner left; very rare variant; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00




  



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