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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military||View Options:  |  |  |   

Military, Combat & Arms on Ancient Coins
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 113 - 95 B.C

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |113| |-| |95| |B.C||tetradrachm|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY95956. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2384; Houghton CSE 725; Babelon Rois 1467; BMC Seleucid p. 92, 6; HGC 9 1288k (R2), gVF, well centered, dark old cabinet toning, old scratches, light deposits, weight 15.977 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 2nd reign, 113 - 112 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos right; reverse Athena standing left, Nike in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, spear behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two lines downward on right, ΦIΛO−ΠATOPOΣ downward on left, ΣI∆Ω/IEP / AΣY in 3 lines over outer left, Σ (year 200) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $550.00 (500.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||sestertius|
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SH98839. Orichalcum sestertius, BnF II 490; Hendin 6530 (S); RIC II 159; BMCRE II p. 115, 532 ff., F, centered, rough, corrosion and pitting, weight 24.234 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate bust right; reverse IVDAEA CAPTA, date palm tree in center, male captive on left standing right with hands bound behind his back, Jewess on right sitting right on cuirass propping her head with her left hand in attitude of mourning, shields flanking them, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from an Israeli collection, ex Elsen auction 143 (7 Dec 2019), lot 376; scarce; $500.00 (455.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

|Postumus|, |Gallic| |Empire,| |Postumus,| |Summer| |260| |-| |Spring| |269| |A.D.||double| |sestertius|
This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance. Unfortunately for Postumus, Fides is only an imaginary goddess, his disgruntled troops killed him after he refused to allow them to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz, Germany).
RB98102. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC V-2 123, Cohen VI 74, Bastien Postume 77, Mairat 189, Hunter IV 101, SRCV III 11040, gF, obverse a little off center, parts of legends weak/unstruck, minor edge split, minor porosity, weight 18.031 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, France) mint, 3rd bronze emission, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse FIDES MILITVM (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides Militum standing facing, head left, flanked by two signum, one in each hand; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; $270.00 (245.70)


Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, c. 49 - 95 A.D., for Domitian

|Agrippa| |II|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |Agrippa| |II,| |c.| |49| |-| |95| |A.D.,| |for| |Domitian||full| |unit|
We use the dating provided by RPC Online, which adopts 60/61 A.D. for year 1 of the era used by Agrippa II. This solves a number of issues with previous dating schemes, but adds the oddity of a large number of issues of posthumous coinage for Vespasian and Titus. This coin struck for Titus, for example; dated year 30 using this era is 89/90 A.D. Titus died in 81 B.C.
JD98848. Bronze full unit, Hendin 6328 (RR); RPC Online II 2296; BMC Palestine p. 243, 56; SNG ANS 315; Meshorer TJC 179; Sofaer p. 268 & pl. 218, 260, gF, well centered, earthen encrustation, edge split, weight 10.858 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Paneas (Banias, Golan Heights) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA ∆OMITIA KAICAP A ΓEPMANI (Emperor Domitian Caesar Germanicus), laureate head of Titus right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing slightly left, head left, stalks of barley in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ETOY - EΛ BA / AΓPI-ΠΠA (year 35, King Agrippa) in two lines divided across the field below center; from an Israeli collection; rare; $220.00 (200.20)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Stobi, Macedonia

|Stobi|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Stobi,| |Macedonia||diassarion|
Stobi was an ancient town of Paeonia, conquered by Macedonia, and later made the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia Salutaris. Stobi prospered under Rome and in 69 A.D. was designated a municipium. Citizens of Stobi enjoyed Ius Italicum and were citizens of Rome. Theodosius I stayed in Stobi in 388. In 479, Stobi was sacked by the Ostrogothic king Theodoric. The town was rebuilt, but in 518 was struck by a powerful earthquake. Avaro-Slavic invasions in the 6th century ruined the city's economy and infrastructure. Stobi is perhaps the most important archaeological site in the Republic of Macedonia.
RP97765. Bronze diassarion, Josifovski Stobi 160 ff.; Varbanov III 3908 (R3); SNG Cop 333 var. (rev. leg).; BMC Macedonia p. 104, 7 var. (same), gVF, excellent portrait, broad flan, near full legends, brown and green patina, central depressions, weight 6.151 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Stobi (Gradsko, Macedonia) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, chignon at back of head; reverse MVNICI STO-BEN, Victory walking left, wreath extended in right hand, palm frond in left hand over shoulder; $180.00 (163.80)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
This type refers to Severus' victories over Parthia. Severus assumed the title "Parthicus Maximus," greatest of Parthian conquerors.
RS99246. Silver denarius, BMCRE V p. 288, 675; RIC IV 514 corr. (palm vice trophy); RSC III 741; SRCV II 6373; Hunter III 200, Choice VF, light toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.054 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 202 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse VICT PARTHICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in extended right hand, trophy of captured arms in left; Parthian captive at feet on left, bearded and wearing a Parthian cap, seated left, looking up and back at Victory, hands bound behind back; $165.00 (150.15)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Cremna, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Cremna,| |Pisidia||AE| |29|
Cremna in Pisidia was taken by Amyntas, commander of the Galatian auxiliary of Brutus and Cassius. He became king of Galatia and Pisidia after going over to the side of Mark Antony. After his death in 25 B.C., Cremna became a Roman colony. A donatio given by Aurelian promised a period of great prosperity; but in 276 the town was taken by an Isaurian robber, named Lydius. He used it as a base for looting, prompting Tacitus to make the first and only visit of a Roman emperor to the region. Cremna was abandoned in the Middle Ages. The ancient site stands on a hill over the ancient Cestrus (Aksu) River, in Burdur Province, Turkey. Nearly all the buildings have been reduced to heaps of stone.
RP98458. Bronze AE 29, unpublished in major references; BMC Lycia -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, SNG BnF -, Isegrim -, F, legends weak, edge cracks, weight 8.841 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Cremna (in Bucak district, Turkey) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse [IMP C L SEP?] SEVER - PERTIN AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL C-REM - AVG, Aquila (legionary eagle standard) between two signa standards surmounted by wreath; from the Michael Arslan Collection; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $160.00 (145.60)


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|
Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius.
JD98809. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6377; Meshorer TJC 340; Sofaer 59; BMC Palestine p. 264, 21; RPC I 4971, gF, near full legends, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, marks, obv. edge beveled, weight 2.984 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, under Nero, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two crossed oblong shields with two crossed spears on far side; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) in two divided lines flanking trunk; from an Israeli collection; $160.00 (145.60)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D.

|Maximinus| |I|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |Late| |May| |238| |A.D.||denarius|
Maximinus' first campaign was against the Alamanni, whom he defeated despite heavy Roman casualties. After the victory, he took the title Germanicus Maximus. The Historia Augusta, mentions that Maximinus marched north from Moguntiacum (today's Mainz) about trecenta (300) to quadringenta (400) Roman miles. Since this was thought to be impossible, the passage was often "corrected" to read triginta (30) to quadraginta (40) Roman miles. New evidence indicates Maximinus did launch a campaign deep into Germania and defeated a Germanic tribe in a battle at the Harzhorn pass in Northern Germany. The site of the battle was discovered in 2000 by hobby archaeologists using metal detectors. The latest coins found at the site to date were struck under Severus Alexander. By 2008 it was clear from the artifacts discovered that this was the site of a battle involving a large number of Roman troops. The current hypothesis is that the Roman troops were on their way back from the North German Plain. They found the Harzhorn pass blocked by a large number of Germans, and successfully fought their way through by using their superior technology, Roman artillery.
RS99254. Silver denarius, RIC IV 23, RSC III 107, BMCRE VI 187, SRCV III 8318, Hunter III 19, Choice gVF, centered on a broad flan, flow lines, flan cracks, die wear, weight 2.335 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Jan 236 - Apr 238 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse VICTORIA GERM (victory over the Germans), Victory standing half left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, captive seated left at feet on left; $160.00 (145.60)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS98485. Silver denarius, RIC IV 504 (S), RSC III 100, BMCRE V 657, SRCV II 6270, Hunter III 196, gVF, choice obv., nice slightly off center rev., light amber toning, flow lines, small edge cracks, weight 3.605 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 150o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 202 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse COS III P P, Victory advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $150.00 (136.50)




  



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