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Ancient Coins of Arabia

Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |5| |-| |4| |B.C.||AE| |14|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. The normal issue of this type has the monograms of Aretas (heth) and his son, Phasael, (peh sade).
GB110807. Bronze AE 14, Meshorer Nabataean 63A var. (monograms); Barkay CN 117 var. (same); Al-Qatanani 185t9 var. (same); Schmitte-Korte 1990 49 var. (same, VF, attractive dark green patina with reddish earthen highlighting, light scratches, weight 1.898 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head right; reverse two parallel cornucopias, tops left, tided with ribbon, palm frond on right; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but the style matches coins struck from 88 - 92 A.D.
GS110743. Billon drachm, cf. Al-Qatanani 238 - 240 (yrs. 20 - 21); Meshorer Nabataean 153 (yr. 21); Barkay CN 231 - 233 (yrs. 19 - 21); BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 (date off flan), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off most of legends, weight 3.316 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 88 - 91 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend, "Rabbel the king, of the Nabataeans, year [19 - 21?]" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend, "Gamilath, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilath right; $190.00 SALE PRICE $171.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |15|
Aretas IV was the greatest Nabataean king, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. He took the name Philopatris, lover of his people. Aretas married Shuqailat, his second wife, in 16 A.D. Aretas' daughter Phasaelis was married to, and divorced from, Herod Antipas. Herod then married his stepbrother's wife, Herodias. It was opposition to this marriage that led to the beheading of John the Baptist. After he received news of the divorce, Aretas invaded the territory of Herod Antipas and defeated his army. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus, when he had to sneak out of the city in a basket lowered from a window in the wall to escape (2 Corinthians 11:32). Al-Khazneh, one of the most elaborate buildings in Petra, is believed to have been his mausoleum.
GB110802. Bronze AE 15, Al-Qatanani 156, Barkay CN 187d, Huth 80, Meshorer Nabataean 97, SNG ANS 6 1435, gVF, dark green patina, highlighting buff earthen highlighting, flan adjustment marks, casting sprue remnant, weight 2.182 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 18 - 19 A.D.; obverse Aretas standing facing, looking left, laureate, wearing military dress, scarf and high boots, spear in right hand, left on pommel of sword in scabbard, palm frond left, Aramaic monogram (H) upper right; reverse Shuqailat standing left, veiled, wearing long chiton, right hand raised, wreath left, Aramaic legend "Shuqa/ila/t" in three lines on right; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D., Barbaric Imitative

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.,| |Barbaric| |Imitative||AE| |14|
Aretas IV was the greatest Nabataean king, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. Al-Khazneh,one of the most elaborate temples in Petra, is believed to have been the mausoleum of Aretas IV. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32). Al-Khazneh, one of the most elaborate temples in Petra, is believed to have been the mausoleum of Aretas IV.
GB94966. Bronze AE 14, Al-Qatanani 141t6 (die match, barbaric style), Meshorer Nabataean 68A; cf. Huth 77 (official style), Barkay CN 150c (same), Schmitt-Korte 38 (same), VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. off center, reverse edge beveled, small edge split, weight 1.482 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, unofficial mint, c. 2 - 24; obverse laureate head of Aretas right; reverse two crossed and filleted cornucopias, Nabataean het ros monogram (Aretas) between the horns; from the Ray Nouri Collection; extremely rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but the style matches coins struck from 88 - 92 A.D.
GS110752. Billon drachm, cf. Al-Qatanani 238 - 240 (yrs. 20 - 21); Meshorer Nabataean 153 (yr. 21); Barkay CN 231 - 233 (yrs. 19 - 21); BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 (date off flan), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off much of legends, weight 3.584 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 88 - 91 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend, "Rabbel the king, of the Nabataeans, year [19 - 21?]" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend, "Gamilath, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilath right; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |5| |-| |4| |B.C.||AE| |14|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94965. Bronze AE 14, cf. Al-Qatanani 178t1; Barkay CN 118a; Huth 82; Meshorer Nabataean 64; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, aVF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, scratches, remnant of a pre-strike casting sprue, weight 1.710 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Nabataean H (het) left, O (ayin) right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, two pomegranates dangling from tops above center, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' son) in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |17|
Aretas IV was the greatest Nabataean king, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. He took the name Philopatris, lover of his people. Aretas married Shuqailat, his second wife, in 16 A.D. Aretas' daughter Phasaelis was married to, and divorced from, Herod Antipas. Herod then married his stepbrother's wife, Herodias. It was opposition to this marriage that led to the beheading of John the Baptist. After he received news of the divorce, Aretas invaded the territory of Herod Antipas and defeated his army. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus, when he had to sneak out of the city in a basket lowered from a window in the wall to escape (2 Corinthians 11:32). Al-Khazneh, one of the most elaborate buildings in Petra, is believed to have been his mausoleum.
GB110810. Bronze AE 17, Al-Qatanani 156t2, Barkay CN 187, Huth 80, Meshorer Nabataean 97, SNG ANS 6 1435, VF, near black patina, obv. a little off center, centers weak, flan adjustment marks, remnants of casting sprues, weight 1.943 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 18 - 19 A.D.; obverse Aretas standing facing, looking left, laureate, wearing military dress, scarf and high boots, spear in right hand, left on pommel of sword in scabbard, palm frond left, no monogram; reverse Shuqailat standing left, veiled, wearing long chiton, right hand raised, wreath left, Aramaic legend "Shuqa/ila/t" in three lines on right; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II and Gamilat, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II| |and| |Gamilat,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but it appears to be a die match to a year 22 coin.
GS110741. Billon drachm, Barkay CN 234 (same obv. die); Al-Qatanani 241, Meshorer Nabataean 154; cf. BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 & pl. II, 18 (date off flan); SNG ANS 1445 (same), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off most of legends, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 91 - 92 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend: "Rabbel the king, king of the Nabataeans, year 22" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend: "Gamilat, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilat right; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Anonymous Issue, c. 272 - 72 B.C.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Anonymous| |Issue,| |c.| |272| |-| |72| |B.C.||AE| |18|
There has been much debate over the dating of this bronze type, imitative of the gold staters of Alexander. Great variation in style suggests a long period of striking and they are often overstruck on coins of Ptolemy I - III. They were most likely struck at the desert citadel of Petra before Aretas III lost Damascus to Tigranes II in 72 B.C., and then transferred his royal mint to Petra.
GB110809. Bronze AE 18, Barkay CN 1, Meshorer Nabataea 1; Huth 44; HGC 10, 671, gF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. edge beveled, central dimples, weight 3.911 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 90o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 272 - 72 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, Λ in left field; scarce; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||drachm|
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis. This type was almost certainly struck with silver from the Nabatean treasury. Some specimens appear to have been overstruck on Nabatean drachms.
RS111192. Silver drachm, cf. Metcalf Tell Kalak 15 - 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 184, 185, 189 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery), aVF, dark tone, tight flan, a few small scratches, weight 2.912 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, Jan 112 - Aug 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ΔAK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞ IΣ (or Z, or H) YΠAT Σ (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 (or 17, or 18) years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00




  



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REFERENCES

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