Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 4 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Books Clearance Sale Now - Many at or Below Our Wholesale Cost!!! Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 4 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Phrygia

Phrygia lies in western central Anatolia (Asia Minor) between Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Pisidia, and Galatia. The cities were found in the valleys and high plains between the many high mountains of the land. The native Phrygians, whose inscriptions have not yet been deciphered, fell under Lydian, then Persian, then Macedonian rule. Greek and Macedonian settlers were planted in Phrygia by the Seleucids and Attalids in a mutual rivalry, but northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts (eventually it would become Galatia). After the defeat of Antiochus at Magnesia, Phrygia was assigned to the kingdom of Pergamum in 188 B.C., after which it became intensely Hellenized and first struck coins. Rome took control, along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, in 133 B.C.

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Nacolea, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Nacolea,| |Phrygia||diassarion|NEW
Nakoleia (also known as Nakolaion, Nacoleia, Nacolia or Nacolea) was an ancient and medieval city in Phrygia. It corresponds to present-day Seyitgazi, Eskisehir Province, Turkey. It was named for the nymph Nacole. The area was known for its fertility in late Roman times, thanks to the river Parthenios (Seyit Su), and was wooded in the late 4th century (now deforested). It was there that Valens defeated the usurper Procopius in 366 A.D. at the Battle of Thyatira. Under Arcadius it was occupied by a garrison of Goths under Tribigild who revolted against the emperor in 399 A.D. In the early 8th century, Nakoleia's bishop Constantine became a leading proponent of Byzantine Iconoclasm under Leo III the Isaurian (ruled 717- 741) and was later condemned as an heresiarch at the Second Council of Nicaea (787). In 782, Nakoleia was temporarily captured by the Abbasid Caliphate. Nakoleia was elevated to the rank of an archbishopric between 787 and 862, and eventually to a metropolitan see between 1035 and 1066, when its incumbent appears in the last place among the metropolitans attending a council.
RP110156. Bronze diassarion, RPC III 2659 (10 spec. incl. leg. var.), vA Phryg I 650, SNGvA 3896, SNG Mu 419 var. (obv. leg.), Imhoof KM 279/1 var. (same), Wadd 6350 var. (same), VF, near centered, well struck, dark patina, earthen deposits, cleaning scratches, weight 5.510 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Nakoleia (Seyitgazi, Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse AV NE TPAIANOC KAICAP CE, laureate head right; reverse NAKOΛEΩN, Asclepius (god of medicine and healing) standing slightly left, head left, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs and over left forearm, grounded snake entwined staff in right hand; this is the first coin of Nacoleia handled by FORVM; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; very rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IEPA CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $135.00 SALE PRICE $121.00


Agrippina Junior, Augusta 50 - March 59 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia

|Hierapolis|, |Agrippina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |50| |-| |March| |59| |A.D.,| |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia||assarion|NEW
Hierapolis (Greek: "Holy City") was located on hot springs in Phrygia in southwestern Anatolia. Its ruins are adjacent to modern Pamukkale in Turkey and are designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The hot springs have been used as a spa since the 2nd century B.C., with many patrons retiring or dying there. The large necropolis is filled with sarcophagi.
RP110002. Bronze assarion, RPC I 2983 (4 spec.); SNGvA 3649; BMC Phrygia p. 249, 127, VF, rough areas of light corrosion, legends weak, weight 3.731 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, magistrate Magytes Neoteros, c. 55 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠΠINA ΣEBAΣTH, draped bust right; reverse MAΓYTHΣ NEΩTEPOΣ IEPAΠOΛEITΩN, Demeter seated left on throne, stalk of grain and two poppies in right hand; rare; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia

|Hierapolis|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia||AE| |19|NEW
Hierapolis (Greek: "Holy City") was located on hot springs in Phrygia in southwestern Anatolia. Its ruins are adjacent to modern Pamukkale in Turkey and are designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The hot springs have been used as a spa since the 2nd century B.C., with many patrons retiring or dying there. The large necropolis is filled with sarcophagi.
RP110159. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2970; SNGvA 3647; SNG Cop 455; BMC Phrygia p. 247, 114, aVF, nice green patina, legends weak or unstruck, scratches, weight 5.527 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, grammateus M. Suillios Antiochos, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse KΛAY∆IOΣ KAIΣAΠ, λαυρεατε ηεαδ ριγητ; ρεϖερσε M ΣYIΛΛIOΣ ANTIOXOΣ ΓPA IEPAΠOΛITΩN, Apollo on horseback right, labrys (double axe) in left hand over left shoulder; scarce; $125.00 SALE PRICE $112.00


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 235 - 238 A.D. Diogenes, Archon

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |235| |-| |238| |A.D.| |Diogenes,| |Archon||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP97257. Bronze diassarion, SNG Cop 318 - 319; BMC Phrygia p. 162, 20, SNGvA 3776, SNG Righetti 1165, Kurth Demos 398, Martin Demos 16, VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light marks, some die wear, weight 7.915 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Ktahya, Turkey) mint, time of Valerian I - Gallienus, c. 235 - 238 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI ∆IOΓENOVC ∆IONVCIOV (struck under Diogenes, son of Dionysios), Zeus seated left on a low backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, A-PX (archon - Diogenes' title) divided across fields, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; rare; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.00


Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia, Magistrate Pythes Pythou, 14 - 37 A.D.

|Laodicea| |ad| |Lycus|, |Laodicea| |ad| |Lycus,| |Phrygia,| |Magistrate| |Pythes| |Pythou,| |14| |-| |37| |A.D.||AE| |18|NEW
Laodicea on the Lycus was on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana, now near the modern city of Denizli, Turkey. It was home to one of the Seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelation. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. Its ruins attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled. Laodicea
RP90235. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2902 (14 spec.); BMC Phrygia, p. 287, 55; SNG Cop 509; SNG Lewis 1599; Martin Demos Laodikeia 2; Waddington 6259, F, broad flan, porous, flan adjustment marks, weight 4.284 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea, Phrygia mint, time of Tiberius, 14 - 37 A.D.; obverse PYΘHrare Roman provincial non-imperial portrait coin; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Eumeneia, Phrygia

|Eumeneia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia||AE| |26|NEW
Eumenea, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP110014. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online IV-2 T1989; BMC Phrygia p. 219, 56; SNGvA 3594; SNG Leypold II 1540; Weber 7096; SNG Tbingen 4014; SNG Cop -, F, rough, black patina, weight 10.205 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, obverse AVTO KAICA ANTΩNEINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, aegis on left shoulder, seen from the front; reverse EVMENEΩN AXAIΩN, hump-backed bull walking left, Nike walking left on far side of bull, wearing chiton, grasping bull's left horn and guiding bull with left hand, brandishing knife to sacrifice bull in right hand; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Cibyra, Phrygia, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cibyra,| |Phrygia,| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |26|NEW
Nemesis, the winged balancer of life, is the goddess of revenge, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers. She distributes fortune, good or bad, in due proportion to each according to what is deserved. She often holds a lorum, a long scarf worn by Roman magistrates, to symbolize her authority as judge, and sometimes holds scales and cubit rule to measure each man's just deserts. The wheel of fate sometimes rests against her side. On this coin she holds her adamantine bridles to restrain the frivolous insolences of mortals.
RP110162. Bronze AE 26, SNGvA 3726; SNG Cop 277; BMC Phrygia p. 136, 33, aVF/F, well centered, dark tone, earthen encrustation, weight 10.162 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Glhisar, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse BOYΛH (clockwise from upper right), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse KAIC KIBY-PATΩN, Nemesis standing facing, head left, pulling out chiton from her breast with right hand, adamantine bridles in left hand hanging down at side ; rare; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Kibyra, Phrygia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Kibyra,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |21|NEW
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Glhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP110161. Bronze AE 21, RPC IV.2 T1953 (10 spec.); Kurth Demos 358; SNG Cop 276; SNGvA 3724; BMC Phrygia p. 135, 25; SNG Mu -; Lindgren -, aVF/VF, dark green patina, rough, porous, earthen deposits, broad flan, weight 6.631 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (clockwise from upper right), laureate head of Demos right, unbearded; reverse KIBYPATWN, Demeter standing slightly left, head left, wearing long chiton and veil, poppy and grain in right hand, long torch in left hand; rare; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00










REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Trait des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Mnzen in Winterthur, Vol. 2: Bosporus, Pontus, Armenia, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Phrygia.... (Winterthur, 1987).
Brett, A. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
de Callata, F. "Le premier monnayage de la cit d'Amastris (Paphlagonie)" in SNR 2004.
Franke, P. & M Noell. Die Homonoia-Mnzen Kleinasiens und der thrakischen Randgebiete. (Saarbrcken, 1997).
Head, B. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Phrygia. (London, 1906).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia...5th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Mnzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und rmischen Mnzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Newell, E. The Alexandrine Coinage of Sinope. (New York, 1919).
Price, M. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
Radet, G. En Phrygie. (Paris, 1893).
Reinach, T. L'histoire par les monnaies: essais de numismatique ancienne. (Paris, 1902).
Reinach, T. Numismatique Ancienne: Trois Royaumes De L'asie Mineure, Cappadoce-Bithynie-Pont. (Paris, 1888).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Ble, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part| 24: Phrygien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnzsammlung Universitt Tbingen, Part| 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Rmische Provinzprgungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. Addenda. (gold and silver). (London, 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus-Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, sterreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Mnzen der Kaiserzeit, Vol. II: Phrygia-Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Russia, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts: Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Leuven, Belgium, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
Waddington, W., E. Babelon & T. Reinach. Recueil Gnral des Monnaies Grecques d'Asie Minuere, Vol. I. (Paris, 1904-25).

Catalog current as of Friday, September 30, 2022.
Page created in 1.079 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity