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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman RepublicView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the Roman Republic

Roman Republic, Julius Caesar, Posthumous, 42 B.C., Moneyer L. Livineius Regulus

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L. Livineius Regulus had served with Caesar in North Africa.
SH87936. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1425, Crawford 494/24, Sear CRI 115, Sydenham 1106, RSC I 27, BMCRR Rome 4274, F, iridescent rainbow toning, well centered, banker's mark, weight 3.462 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 42 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, laurel branch behind, winged caduceus before; reverse L LIVINEIVS / REGVLVS, bull charging right; rare; $760.00 (€646.00)


Roman Republic, Libral Cast Series, 225 - 217 B.C.

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The prow right aes grave are common in the as to sextans denominations, but scarce for uncia. This issue was followed by the prow left series, which has no uncia.
RR88347. Aes grave (cast) uncia, Crawford 35/6; Sydenham 77; Haeberlin pl. 18, 22 ff.; Thurlow-Vecchi 56; Vecchi ICC 83; HN Italy 342; RBW Collection 90, SRCV I 589, VF, sculptural high relief, very nice for the type, bumps and marks, edge split (apparently where a casting sprue was snapped off), weight 19.201 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 225 - 217 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left, wearing a crested Attic helmet, • (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right; • (mark of value) below; $550.00 (€467.50)


Luceria, Apulia, Italy, c. 211 - 200 B.C.

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In 321 B.C., the Romans, deceived into thinking Lucera was under siege by the Samnites, walked into an ambush and were defeated. The town threw out the Samnites, sought Roman protection, and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. To strengthen ties, 2,500 Romans moved to Lucera. Roman culture merged with the native one slowly, probably accompanied by cross-cultural marriages, but Lucera was a steadfast supporter of Rome. By the 2nd century B.C., the rustic town was transformed into a proper Roman city with houses, public buildings, paved roads, sidewalks and services for travelers, accommodation for livestock with running water, and warehouses for storing goods.
GB86125. Bronze uncia, SNG ANS 709; SNG Cop 663; SNG BnF 1368; SNG München 504; HN Italy 682; BMC Italy p. 141, 62; Hunterian -, VF, rough, weight 4.084 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Luceria mint, c. 211 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver at shoulder, pellet behind; reverse LOVC-ERI, toad seen from above; very rare; $540.00 (€459.00)


Roman Republic, C. Sulpicius C. f. Galba, 106 B.C.

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Crawford interprets this type as Aeneas landing in Lanuvium (home of Sulpicia gens) with the Penates and the subsequent miracle of the white sow that foretold the founding of Alba Longa.
RR88378. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I Rome 1319 (also L), Crawford 312/1, Sydenham 572, RSC I Sulpicia 1, RBW Collection 1155, SRCV I 189, VF, attractive toning, nice style, light marks, weight 3.643 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 106 B.C.; obverse conjoined laureate heads of the Dei Penates left, D•P•P (Dei Penates Publici) downward on left; reverse the Dei Penates standing facing each other, heads bare, wearing military garb, each holding a spear in left hand, each pointing at a large sow which lies between them, L (control letter) above center, C•SVLPICI•C•F in exergue; ex Wayne G. Sayles; $290.00 (€246.50)


Roman Republic, Q. Minucius M.f. Thermus, 103 B.C.

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The reverse refers to the moneyer's ancestor, Q. Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, consul in 193 B.C., who distinguished himself by his bravery against the Ligurians.
RR88379. Silver denarius, Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, RSC I Minucia 19, BMCRR Italy 653, RBW Collection 1174, SRCV I 197, gVF, attractive style, light marks, some die wear, exergue not fully struck, weight 3.670 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 60o, Rome mint, 103 B.C.; obverse head of Mars left, wearing crested helmet, side ornamented with feather and annulet; reverse Roman soldier, on the left, fighting a barbarian, on the right, protecting a fallen comrade in center below, each holding a sword and shield, Roman soldier holds oval shield ornamented with a thunderbolt, barbarian wears a horned helmet, Q•TERM•MF in exergue; $270.00 (€229.50)


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, Lucius Hostilius Saserna, 48 B.C.

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The events of 48 B.C. are among the best known of ancient history. Caesar defeated Pompey at Pharsalus and later was greeted at Alexandria with a gift of Pompey's head. The twenty-one year old Cleopatra VII had herself delivered to him rolled in a carpet and became his mistress. Caesar and Cleopatra defeated Ptolemy XIII, but during the battle the Library of Alexandria was burned.
RR88450. Silver denarius, Crawford 448/1a, Sydenham 951, BMCRR I Rome 3989, RSC I Hostilia 5, Sear CRI 17, RBW Collection 1567, SRCV I 417, EF, lightly toned, tight flan cutting off left side of reverse legend, weight 3.667 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 48 B.C.; obverse female head (Pietas or Clementia?) right, wearing oak wreath, cruciform earring, necklace, jewel above her ear, hair collected into a knot behind, and lock falling down her neck; reverse L HOSTILIVS SASERNA clockwise from upper right, Victory running right, winged caduceus in right, Gallic trophy and palm fronds in left; ex Naville Numismatics, auction 42 (22 Jul 2018), lot 471; $240.00 (€204.00)


Roman Republic, Marcus Herennius, 108 - 107 B.C.

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The Cantanaean brothers, Amphinomus and Anapias, saved their parents after an eruption of Mt. Etna, carrying them on their shoulders to safety. This was a favorite story among the Romans, for whom duty to family was among the most important virtues, fundamental to the Roman ideal of pietas. This moneyer had some connection to Sicily.
RR88377. Silver denarius, Crawford 308/1a, RSC I Herennia 1, Sydenham 567, SRCV I 185, BMCRR I Rome 1263 var. (control), RBW Collection 1149 var. (control), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, light marks, frosty surfaces with slightest porosity, weight 3.791 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 108 - 107 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Pietas right, PIETAS (TA ligate) downward behind, (control symbol) below chin; reverse one of Cantanaean brothers running right, nude, bearing his father on his shoulders, his father looking back and raising right hand, M•HERENNI (HE ligate) downward on left; $225.00 (€191.25)


Roman Republic, M. Herennius, 108 - 107 B.C.

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The Cantanaean brothers, Amphinomus and Anapias, saved their parents after an eruption of Mt. Etna, carrying them on their shoulders to safety. This was a favorite story among the Romans, for whom duty to family was among the most important virtues, fundamental to the Roman ideal of pietas. This moneyer had some connection to Sicily.
RR88989. Silver denarius, BMCRR I Rome 1250 (same control), Crawford 308/1a, RSC I Herennia 1a, Sydenham 567a, SRCV I 185, RBW Collection 1149 var. (X•), Choice VF, perfect centering, toned, light marks, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.891 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 108 - 107 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Pietas right, PIETAS (TA ligate) downward behind; reverse One of Cantanaean brothers running right, nude, bearing his father on his shoulders, his father looking back and raising right hand, M•HERENNI (HE ligate) downward on left, Q (control symbol) lower right; ex Harlan J. Berk; $225.00 (€191.25)


Roman Republic, Cn. Cornelius Blasio Cn.f., 112 or 111 B.C.

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Crawford notes this type was issued with 12 different symbol pairs, each used for one month of the year. This bust was traditionally identified as Scipio Africanus but Crawford convincingly rejected that identification. The bust on the right is Scipio Africanus. Perhaps there is some resemblance that was the source of the tradition? Scipio

RR88375. Silver denarius, Crawford 296/1d (same controls), RBW Collection 1136 (same), BMCRR Italy 628 (same), Sydenham 561b (scarce), RSC I Cornelia 19, SRCV I 173, VF, toned, light marks, some die wear, reverse slightly off center, edge crack, weight 3.898 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 112 or 111 B.C.; obverse CN BLASIO CN F upward on right, beardless helmeted head of Mars right, X (mark of value=16 asses) above, acrostolium (control symbol) behind; reverse Jupiter standing facing, nude, long scepter in right hand, thunderbolt and paludamentum in left hand, between Juno (on left), and Minerva (on right) placing wreath on his head with her right hand and holding spear in left hand, Π (Greek control letter) inner right, ROMA in exergue; ex Wayne G. Sayles; scarce; $210.00 (€178.50)


Roman Republic, Fragment of an Aes Formatum Large Domed Disc Ingot, 4th Century B.C.

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Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was a precursor to the issues of aes grave but later than aes rude. Presumably, molten bronze-iron alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. Broken examples like this one are much more common than complete ones.
RR86151. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7; fragment, weight 199.40 g, maximum diameter 66.1 mm, Italian mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; rare; $200.00 (€170.00)




  






REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

Catalog current as of Sunday, February 17, 2019.
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Roman Republic