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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Cities in the Bible||View Options:  |  |  |   

Cities in the Bible

The coins below were minted by cities that are mentioned in the bible. Click here to read about the travels of Paul.

Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Gaza, Judaea, Syria Palaestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Gaza,| |Judaea,| |Syria| |Palaestina||AE| |20|
Throughout the Roman period, Gaza was a prosperous city and received grants and attention from several emperors. A 500-member senate governed Gaza, and a diverse variety of Philistines, Greeks, Romans, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Jews, Egyptians, Persians and Bedouin populated the city. Gaza's mint stamped out coins adorned with the busts of gods, emperors, and empresses. In 66 A.D., Gaza was burned down by Jews during their rebellion against the Romans. However, it remained an important city; even more so after the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus the following year.
RP98106. Bronze AE 20, Sofaer pl. 110, 118 (same rev. die); RPC IV.3 T9072 (2 spec., same obv. die, Marnas below date on plate); Rosenberger II 95; BMC Palestine p. 155, 89, Choice gVF, part of ethnic and date unstruck, attractive enhanced desert patina, weight 6.351 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gaza mint, 163 - 164 A.D.; obverse ANTWNEN-OC CEB (starting from the upper right, letters OC CEB on the left all reversed), laureate, draped bust right; reverse ΓAZA (upward on left), ∆KC (year 224, upward on right), Tyche wearing standing facing, looking left, kalathos on head, long grounded scepter vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left, heifer standing left at feet on left, Marnas symbol upper right above date; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $450.00 (369.00)


Marcus Aurelius & Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem), Judaea, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius| |&| |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Aelia| |Capitolina| |(Jerusalem),| |Judaea,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |23|
During his famous travels, Hadrian visited Judaea and initiated reconstruction of Jerusalem on the Roman model, with a temple of Jupiter replacing the Jewish Temple and restrictions on circumcision. This triggered the Bar-Kochba war, lasting three years and brutal beyond imagination. Hadrian sought to eradicate Judaism and renamed the city Aelia Capitolina. Aelia came from Hadrian's nomen gentile, Aelius, while Capitolina meant that the new city was dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus, to whom a temple was built on the Temple Mount.
RP98116. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online IV.3 T6416 (9 spec.); Sofaer 55; Meshorer Aelia 56; Rosenberger 35; Kadman Aelia 59; BMC Palestine p. 90, 51; SNG ANS -, nice VF, well centered on a tight flan, attractive near black patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 10.645 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 180o, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem) mint, 7 Mar 161 - Feb 169 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES ANTONINO ET VERO AVG, confronted, laureate, draped, and cuirassed busts of M. Aurelius (on left) and L. Verus; reverse COL AEL CAP (Colonia Aelia Capitolina), draped bust of Serapis left, wearing kalathos; rare; $300.00 (246.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem), Judaea, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Aelia| |Capitolina| |(Jerusalem),| |Judaea,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |22|
At each summer solstice Elagabalus celebrated a great festival during which he paraded the holy stone through the city of Rome. Herodian described the spectacle: "A six horse chariot carried the divinity, the horses huge and flawlessly white, with expensive gold fittings and rich ornaments. No one held the reins, and no one rode in the chariot; the vehicle was escorted as if the god himself were the charioteer. Elagabalus ran backward in front of the chariot, facing the god and holding the horses' reins. He made the whole journey in this reverse fashion, looking up into the face of his god.
RP98115. Bronze AE 22, Sofaer 124 (same dies), Meshorer Aelia 134, cf. Rosenberger I 69 (legends); Kadman Aelia 130 (same), BMC Palestine -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, some corrosion along obverse edge upper right, weight 6.994 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem) mint, 218 - 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTONI, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL AEL CA COMM P F (Colonia Aelia Capitolina Commodiana Pia Felix), draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos; very rare; $270.00 (221.40)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |24|
Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel. It is the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. Neapolis is home to about half the remaining worldwide Samaritan population of 600.
RP98112. Bronze AE 24, SNG ANS 1007 (same dies); cf. Rosenberger II 53; BMC Palestine p. 61, 103; Sofaer 109 - 110; Baramki AUB 36, nice VF, excellent portrait, attractive green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, some legend not fully struck, edge splits, weight 6.701 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP - ANTWNIN, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ΦΛ NE - CVP Π (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina), Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $225.00 (184.50)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||2| |prutot|
Two prutot was equal to a Roman quadrans. -- Talmud Jerus., Kedushin 58d, written c. 200 A.D.
JD97694. Bronze 2 prutot, Meshorer TJC 48a; Hendin 1178; Sofaer Collection 20; BMC Palestine p. 222, 20; RPC Online I 4905; HGC 10 654, gF, dark patina, porosity, highlighting earthen deposits, reverse off center, remnants of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 3.280 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 210o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), cross surrounded by closed diadem; reverse dish on tripod table, flanked by two upright palm branches; $200.00 (164.00)


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

|First| |Jewish| |Revolt|, |The| |First| |Jewish| |Revolt,| |66| |-| |70| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
On Kadman III 12, Meshorer TJC 196, mem has the form . On Kadman III 13, Meshorer TJC 196a, which is much more common, mem has the form .
JD97727. Bronze prutah, Kadman III 13; Meshorer TJC 196; Hendin 1360; SNG ANS 427; Sofaer Collection pl. 222, 11, aVF, natural patina, reverse off center, reverse edge beveled, traces of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 2.853 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew: Year two, amphora with fluted body, narrow neck, broad rim, and two small curved handles; reverse Paleo-Hebrew: The freedom of Zion, vine leaf on small branch with tendril; $180.00 (147.60)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |28|
Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel, the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. The city was refounded as Flavia Neopolis in Syria Palestina after the Jewish Revolt. These coin types were used by archaeologists in the 1950's and 60's to locate the remains of the temple complex by comparing the profile of the mountain to the surrounding terrain.
RP98110. Bronze AE 28, Harl Neapolis 68 (A16/P65); RPC Online VIII U2411; BMC Palestine p. 69, 140; SNG Cop 20; Rosenberger III 101; Sofaer 134 corr. (Philip I), aVF, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, grainy porous surfaces, weight 11.690 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, Jul/Aug 247- Late 249 A.D.; obverse IMP C M IVL PHI-LIPPO P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL SER-G NEAP-OL, Mt. Gerizim comprised of two masses separated by a ravine, arched colonnade below, stairway up the left mass to temple on peak, road up to altar on right peak, all supported by an eagle standing slightly left, head right, wings open; ex Menashe Landman Collection; scarce; $180.00 (147.60)


Faustina Junior, Augusta, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta,| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |19|
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP98113. Bronze AE 19, Sofaer 59 (same dies); BMC Palestine p. 56, 69; Rosenberger III 19; RPC IV Online T6349 (8 specs); SNG Cop 17; de Saulcy p. 253, 5; SNG ANS -, nice gF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, high points flat not fully struck, weight 6.831 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINAN CEBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in chingon; reverse ΦΛ NEACΠOΛE CYPIAC ΠAΛ-AI (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina, the last two letter in exergue and smaller), cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing headdress, two stags at feet, hands resting on supports, ET - Ч (year 90) divided across field above arms; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $160.00 (131.20)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |22|
Kadman Caesarea plate V, 53 is from the same dies. No other examples know to FORVM are from the same dies. Kadman listed it as otherwise unpublished, attributed it to Lucius Verus and read the obverse legend as IMP CAES L AVR VERVS AVG ARM. This portrait does favor Lucius Verus. On the Kadman coin the legend clearly starts IMP CAES but the rest is obscure (at least in the photo). On our coin the right side legend is much clearer and certainly ends ONINVS AVG. The combined legible obverse legend is IMP CAES [... ANT]ONINVS AVG, appropriate for Marcus Aurelius.
RP97647. Bronze AE 22, Kadman I plate V, 53 corr. (same dies, see note); RPC Online IV.3 T6318, BMC Palestine, 83 ff.; SNG ANS 778 f.; SNG Righetti 2383; SNG Hunt II 3560, aVF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, struck on a small flan cutting off part of obverse legend, light marks, weight 12.527 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 7 Mar 161 - 17 Mar 180 A.D.; obverse [IMP CAES M AVR ANT]ONINVS AVG (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL PR FL AV-G CAESAREA, draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos; $140.00 (114.80)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C., Joppa(?), Judaea

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.,| |Joppa(?),| |Judaea||AE| |13|
In 138 B.C., Antiochus VII besieged the Seleukid usurper Tryphon at the fortress-city of Dor. Tryphon escaped, only to be defeated later. Some sources say he was captured and executed, others that he committed suicide. In 134, Antiochus VII laid siege to Jerusalem. According to Josephus, the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus opened King David's sepulcher and removed three thousand talents, which he then paid Antiochus to spare the city.

This type has been traditionally attributed to Ascalon, however, no specimens have been found in the Maresha excavations east of that city. The type is acquired in Lower Galilee, Samaria, and Jerusalem. The types indicate it was likely a military coinage and the aphlaston points to a coastal mint. The evidence suggests it dates to Antiochus' campaign against Tryphon and may have been struck by a military mint attached to the army besieging Dor, perhaps in or around Joppa.
JD98121. Bronze AE 13, Houghton-Lorber II 2122; Brett Ascalon 10; Houghton CSE 818; SNG Spaer 2095; HGC 9 1111 (R1), VF, highlighting earthen deposits, edge splits, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.094 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, die axis 180o, perhaps Joppa (Jaffa, Israel) mint, 138 - 129 B.C.; obverse crested Boeotian helmet with cheek-guards right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY, upright galley aphlaston (ship's stern ornament, also known as an apluster); from an Israeli Collection; rare; $140.00 (114.80)




  



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