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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ after 50 B.C.View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic after 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, Julius Caesar, Posthumous, 42 B.C., Moneyer L. Livineius Regulus

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L. Livineius Regulus had served with Caesar in North Africa.
SH87936. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1425, Crawford 494/24, Sear CRI 115, Sydenham 1106, RSC I 27, BMCRR Rome 4274, F, iridescent rainbow toning, well centered, banker's mark, weight 3.462 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 42 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, laurel branch behind, winged caduceus before; reverse L LIVINEIVS / REGVLVS, bull charging right; rare; $760.00 (€646.00)
 


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, Lucius Hostilius Saserna, 48 B.C.

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The events of 48 B.C. are among the best known of ancient history. Caesar defeated Pompey at Pharsalus and later was greeted at Alexandria with a gift of Pompey's head. The twenty-one year old Cleopatra VII had herself delivered to him rolled in a carpet and became his mistress. Caesar and Cleopatra defeated Ptolemy XIII, but during the battle the Library of Alexandria was burned.
RR88450. Silver denarius, Crawford 448/1a, Sydenham 951, BMCRR I Rome 3989, RSC I Hostilia 5, Sear CRI 17, RBW Collection 1567, SRCV I 417, EF, lightly toned, tight flan cutting off left side of reverse legend, weight 3.667 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 48 B.C.; obverse female head (Pietas or Clementia?) right, wearing oak wreath, cruciform earring, necklace, jewel above her ear, hair collected into a knot behind, and lock falling down her neck; reverse L HOSTILIVS SASERNA clockwise from upper right, Victory running right, winged caduceus in right, Gallic trophy and palm fronds in left; ex Naville Numismatics, auction 42 (22 Jul 2018), lot 471; $240.00 (€204.00)
 


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, Mn. Cordius Rufus, c. 46 B.C.

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The Cordia home, Tusculum, was a center of worship for the Dioscuri. The reverse is a clever play on the moneyer's name and may also compliment Julius Caesar who claimed descent from Venus. The particular design of Venus may derive from a statue placed in the temple of Venus Genetrix in the year of issue.
RR88400. Silver denarius, Sydenham 976, Crawford 463/1a, RSC I Cordia 2a, BMCRR I Rome 4037, RBW Collection 1606, Sear CRI 63, SRCV I 440, gF, attractive iridescent toning, off center, some marks, weight 3.586 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, c. 46 B.C.; obverse RVFVS III VIR downward behind, jugate heads of Dioscuri right, wearing laureate pilei surmounted by stars; reverse MN CORDIVS (MN ligate) downward on right, Venus standing half left, scales in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, Cupid at shoulder; ex The Time Machine; $180.00 (€153.00)
 


The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C.

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THE HISTORY AND COINAGE OF THE ROMAN IMPERATORS 49-27 BC by David Sear

The brief period covered in this book witnessed the violent transition of the Roman state from a republican constitution, presided over by the Senate, to a full military autocracy under the control of one man, the Emperor Augustus. In reality, the events of these years were merely the culmination of a movement which had been gathering strength over the preceding half-century, since the rise of men such as Marius and Sulla. Caesar had put events into motion by his invasion of Italy and his challenge to Pompey's dominant position in Roman politics. With his assassination on the Ides of March, 44 B.C., Caesar's role was inherited by his youthful great-nephew Octavian who, against seemingly hopeless odds, succeeded in eliminating his rivals for supreme power, notably Mark Antony and his ambitious consort Cleopatra, queen of Egypt. This book traces in detail the unfolding of this drama. Each of its six chapters includes a comprehensive catalogue listing of all the relevant coin types and varieties, each with a full discussion of its significance in the interpretation of the events of the period. Information on the rarity of each type, including estimates of current value, is presented in a separate table. The numerous, though less precisely understood, local coinages of the Imperatorial period are listed in an extensive appendix. Whilst providing a comprehensive numismatic reference work for the age of transition from Republic to Empire the author has also aimed to heighten the historian's awareness of the vital role which may be played by the numismatic evidence in the detailed chronicling of event.
BK43171. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C. by David R. Sear, a detailed survey including valuations for collectors, 1998, 360 pages, illustrated throughout, hardback; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins 63 B.C. - 49 B.C.

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This book covers the moneyers who minted between 63 and 49 B.C. Michael Harlan describes the fascinating details of historical events and the social context of the period, the moneyers' family histories, and how all these influenced the coin types.
BK20047. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins 63 B.C. - 49 B.C. by Michael Harlan, 206 pages, illustrated, 1995, only one copy available; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


Political Propaganda in the Coinage of the Late Roman Republic

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Part I. The use of political propaganda in the struggle for power in the year 44 B.C.

Part II. The roles of the army and of propaganda in the formation of political positions in the year 43 B.C.
BK13862. Political Propaganda in the Coinage of the Late Roman Republic by Leslaw Morawiecki, 1983, 108 pages, 8 plates, out of print, paperback; $70.00 (€59.50)
 


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88023. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, tight irregular flan, porosity, scratches, earthen deposits, weight 23.139 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 90o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $60.00 (€51.00)
 


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88024. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, dark patina, porous, earthen encrustations, weight 23.210 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 240o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $60.00 (€51.00)
 


Thessalonica, Macedonia, 88 - 31 B.C.

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King Cassander of Macedonia founded Thessalonica in 315 B.C. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia 168 B.C.
RP88127. Bronze reduced as, AMNG III 20, pl. XXIII, 10; SNG Cop 370; SNG ANS 805; BMC Macedonia p. 112, 37, aVF, compact flan cutting off legend and edges types, areas of weak strike, some corrosion, weight 5.160 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 88 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus; reverse ΘEΣΣAΛO/NIKHΣ, two Centaurs prancing, back to back, each holding a branch; $50.00 (€42.50)
 


Carteia, Hispania Baetica, c. 44 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

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The Latin colony of Carteia was founded in 171 B.C. In 27 B.C., when Augustus had become emperor, Hispania Ulterior was divided into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Cantabria and Basque country were also added to Hispania Citerior.
RP84139. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2609, Villaronga 65; RPC I 116, SNG Cop 434, SNG Lorichs 1337, SNG München -, SNG Tub, VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of heavy scratches, weight 2.922 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Carteia (near San Roque, Spain) mint, c. 44 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse CARTEIA, head of Fortuna-Tyche right, wearing crown of turreted city walls, trident behind; reverse Cupid riding dolphin right, IIII VIR above, EX D D below; $40.00 (€34.00)
 




  






REFERENCES

Albert, R. Die Münzen der römischen Republik. (Regenstauf, 2003).
Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Berger, F. Die Münzen der Römischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
Buttrey, T. "The Denarii of P. Crepusius and Roman Republican Mint Organization" in ANSMN 21 (1976), p. 67-108.
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic Online - http://numismatics.org/chrr/
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Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006) pp. 321-356.
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
De Ruyter, P. "Denarii of the Roman Republican Moneyer Lucius Julius Bursio, a Die Analysis" in NC 156 (1996), p. 79 - 121, pl. 21 - 22.
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 63 BC - 49 BC. (London, 1995).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 81 BCE - 64 BCE. (Citrus Heights, CA, 2012).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 20, 2019.
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Roman Republic after 50 B.C.