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Macedonian Kingdom
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SL89735. Silver drachm, Price P56, SNG Munchen 947, SNG Cop 1105, HGC 3.1, 974e (S), Mller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC MS, 5/5 strike, 5/5 surface, fine style (4629644-013), weight 4.26 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, IAT monogram left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right; ex Giessener Munzhandlung D. Gorny GmbH; $700.00 SALE |PRICE| $630.00


Eastern Celts, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Dachreiter" Type, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Eastern| |Celts,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |"Dachreiter"| |Type,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
Although the body and head of the horseman on the prototype drachm of Philip III of Macedonia have been replaced by an S-shaped line over three pellets, the horseman's leg can still be found on the side of the horse!
SH89462. Silver tetradrachm, Gbl OTA tf. 15, 170/4; Lanz 448, aVF, light toning, reverse slightly off center, light marks, weight 11.953 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse stylized horseman prancing left, rider's head and body reduced to an S-shaped line over three pellets, leg of horseman on side of the horse; $540.00 SALE |PRICE| $486.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |II| |Gonatas,| |277| |-| |239| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Antigonus II Gonatas was a powerful ruler who solidified the position of the Antigonid dynasty in Macedon after a long period defined by anarchy and chaos and acquired fame for his victory over the Gauls who had invaded the Balkans. He was the grandson of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, who then controlled much of Asia. His maternal grandfather was Antipater. who controlled Macedonia and the rest of Greece and was recognized as regent of the empire, which in theory remained united.
SL89733. Silver drachm, Panagopoulou 152; AMNG III-2 p. 187, 5; SNG Cop 1203; SNG Mn 1079; SNG Alpha Bank 984; SNG Lockett 1526; SNG Berry 360; HGC 3.1 1044 (R3), NGC Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (4629570-003), weight 3.59 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 272 - 239 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Poseidon right; reverse Athena Alkidemos advancing left, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, shield decorated with aegis on left arm, Macedonian helmet inner left, TI inner right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: king) downward on right, ANTIΓONOY downward on left; ex CNG Triton IX (10 Jan 2006), lot 829 (realized $600 plus fees); ex Robert Weimer Collection; very rare; $540.00 SALE |PRICE| $486.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Babylonia,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91995. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82.2d, Price 3756, SNG Saroglos 649, Mller Alexander 741, HGC 9 10f, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen -, VF, superb style in sculptural high-relief, light marks, graffiti on reverse upper left, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 17.110 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI over crescent horns upward in left field, MYHP monogram within wreath under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; ex FORVM (2009); $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |c.| |250| |-| |175| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Issue| |in| |the| |Types| |and| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Mesembria, Nesebar Bulgaria today, was a Doric settlement on a Black Sea island just off mainland Thrace. Thrace was invaded by the Galatians in 279 B.C. Only the wealthy coastal cities, including Mesembria, withstood their attacks. Following that chaos, rule of Thrace was divided between many tribes. Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C., tried to regain control of the area for the Macedonian Kingdom, but his success was limited and short lived. Mesembria was taken by Mithradates VI in the First Mithradatic War and surrendered to Rome in 71 B.C. The city struck Alexandrine tetradrachms as early as 275 B.C., more than 50 years after Alexander's death, and probably issued the very last Alexandrine tetradrachms struck anywhere, possibly under Roman rule as late as 65 B.C.
SH91294. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Mller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, light toning, weight 17.003 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Atophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00


Odessos, Thrace, c. 280 - 200 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Odessos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |280| |-| |200| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Issue| |in| |the| |Types| |and| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) was created when Miletian Greeks founded an apoikia (trading post) at an existing Thracian settlement around 600 B.C. Odessos was in the Delian league in the 5th century B.C. Philip II besieged it unsuccessfully in 339. Getae priests persuaded him to make a treaty but the city surrendered to his son Alexander the Great in 335. In 313 B.C., in coalition with other Pontic cities and the Getae, Odessos rebelled against Lysimachus. After Lysimachus' death in 281, the city reverted to striking in the types and names of Alexander the Great and continued to strike Alexandrine tetradrachms until at least 70 B.C. After the Battle of Pydna in 168 B.C., Thrace passed to Rome. The Thracians, however, did not all readily accept Roman dominion. Several revolts occurred. The next century and a half saw the slow development of Thracia into a permanent Roman client state.
SH91295. Silver tetradrachm, Black Sea Hoard 311 - 312 (OK/R32), Price 1160, AMNG II 2116, HGC 3.2 1584, Mller Alexander -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, tight flan, light toning, weight 16.621 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, c. 280 - 200 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, K∆ monogram (magistrate) below arm, O∆H Odessos monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |c.| |250| |-| |175| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Issue| |in| |the| |Types| |and| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH91296. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Mller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, light marks, struck with a slightly dirty reverse die, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Atophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 286 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Demetrios| |I| |Poliorketes,| |306| |-| |286| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Struck by Demetrius I Poliorketes (The Besieger). Demetrius I, the son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, was given the title king by his father in 306 B.C. after he defeated Ptolemy I at the Battle of Salamis. In 294 he seized the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V. The combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, forced him out of Macedonia in 288. Abandoned by his troops on the field of battle he surrendered to Seleucus in 286 and died in captivity in 283 B.C.
GS91299. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3546, Newell Tyrus 16, Hersh Tyrus 1, Mller Alexander -, VF, struck with sculptural high-relief dies, flow lines, obv. off center, tight flan, light marks, mild porosity, die wear, die break rev. 5:00, tiny edge splits, weight 16.831 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, c. 301 - 286 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left on high-backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, monogram in circle left, monogram in circle under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |I| |Monophthalmos,| |Strategos| |of| |Asia,| |320| |-| |306| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander|, |tetradrachm|
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS91301. Silver tetradrachm, In the name of Alexander; Price 3726, Mller Alexander 728, SNG Cop 840, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen -, VF, struck with attractive style sculptural high-relief dies, centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, bumps, light scrapes, weight 16.808 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, under the satrap Peithon, 315 - 311 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue, Zeus seated left on high backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, (AX monogram) left, MYHP monogram in wreath (no pellet in the P) under throne; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |I| |Monophthalmos,| |Strategos| |of| |Asia,| |320| |-| |306| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander|, |tetradrachm|
Azemilkos ('zmlk) was the King of Tyre when, in 332 B.C., Alexander had already peacefully taken Byblos and Sidon. Tyre sent envoys to Alexander agreeing to do his bidding. He declared that he wished to enter the city to sacrifice to Melqart. Azemilkos was with the Persian fleet at the time, and the Tyrians, unsure who would win the war, responded that they would obey any other command but that neither Persians nor Macedonians could enter the city. When Alexander captured the city, Azemilkos and other notables, including envoys from Carthage, had taken refuge in the temple of Melqart. Alexander spared their lives. In 331 B.C., Alexander sent his somatophylakes (bodyguard) Menes of Pella to govern Syria, Phoenicia, and Cilicia, entrusting him at the same time with 3000 talents.
SH91738. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3292, Newell Dated Ake 41 (obv. die XXXIV), Cohen DCA 737, HGC 10 3, Mller Alexander -, SNG Munchen -, SNG Saroglos -,, VF, well centered, tight flan, toned, weight 16.957 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 270o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, struck under Menes, 309 - 308 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne without back, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, Phoenician date left: lll lll-= (year 36 of King Azemilkos); $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00




  






REFERENCES|

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