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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy| ▸ |Maximian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

In 286 A.D., Maximian was sent by the Emperor Diocletian against Gaulish rebels, and upon their defeat was raised to the rank of Augustus on 1 April 286. When Diocletian instituted the Tetrarchy, Maximianus was made emperor of the Western empire and seven years later Constantius I joined him as Caesar. Maximianus was forced to abdicate with Diocletian in 305 A.D., but the year after he resumed the throne with his son Maxentius. Forced to abdicate once again at the Conference of Carnute, he resumed the title of Augustus once more in 310 A.D. but was defeated and forced to commit suicide by Constantine the Great.


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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "Jupiter the Protector of the Emperors." The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he was therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RA92341. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 506, SRCV IV 13143, Cohen VI 355, Hunter IV 4 ff. var. (5th officina not listed), Choice EF, superior style for the period, well struck, full borders, some silvering, weight 3.677 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Rome mint, c. 286 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jupiter the protector of the two emperors), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter in vertical in left hand, XXIE in exergue; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


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In 292, the Roman general Achilleus was proclaimed emperor in Alexandria. For two years he ruled over Egypt, but in the end his rebellion was crushed by Emperor Diocletian.
RA92344. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 561a, Cohen VI 336, SRCV V 13141 var. (...P F AVG), Hunter IV - (p. clxxxix), Choice gVF, attractive portrait, full legends, brown tone, light deposits, weight 3.509 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 292 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVAT (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing slightly left, head right, nude, long grounded scepter in left hand, thunderbolt in left hand, B left, XXIT in exergue; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA92322. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399, bust type H (S); Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, Choice aEF, much silvering, well centered, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.606 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA84973. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399; Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, EF/VF, choice obverse with much silvering, reverse slightly off center with light corrosion, weight 3.476 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


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The Roman's believed Jupiter granted protection and success to his favorites, who tended to be people in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT91843. Copper post-reform radiate, Hunter V 111 (also 2st officina), RIC VI Alexandria 46b, SRCV IV 13317, Cohen VII 54, gVF, excellent portrait, red copper patina with orange earthen highlighting, spots of slightest corrosion, reverse slightly off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.675 g, maximum diameter 20.97 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Alexandria mint, c. 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus (on left) standing right, short scepter in left hand, Jupiter (on right) standing left, offering Victory on globe with right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B in center, ALE in exergue; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA87258. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 Lugdunum 408 (S), Bastien Lyon XI 613 pl. XLIII (5 ex.), Cohen VI 436 var. (helmeted), Hunter IV - (p. clxxxvii), SRCV IV -, gVF, well centered and struck, traces if silvering, porous, weight 3.497 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, emission 12, series 2, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, A in exergue; scarce; $70.00 (€61.60)
 


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About 287, Diocletian assumed the title Iovius and Maximian assumed the title Herculius. The titles were symbolic of their roles: Diocletian-Jove was dominant, responsible for planning and commanding; Maximian-Hercules had the heroic role of completing assigned tasks. Despite the symbolism, the emperors were not actually worshiped as the gods Jupiter and Hercules in the imperial cult. Instead, they were seen as the gods' instruments, imposing the gods' will on earth.
RA91632. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 53 (also 4th officina), RIC V-2 607 corr. (no dot in ex.), SRCV IV 13115, Cohen VI 53, aEF, well centered, nice portrait, most silvering remaining, flow lines, reverse struck with a worn die, weight 2.852 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 286 - 295 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM• (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus standing right with short scepter, Jupiter standing left presenting Victory on globe with right and holding long scepter vertical behind in left, ∆ between them, XXI• in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $45.00 (€39.60)
 


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT91627. Billon follis, Hunter V 95 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Antiochia 54b, SRCV IV 13275, Cohen VII 184, VF, full border centering, scrape on obverse, encrustations,, weight 11.620 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 300 - 301 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, kalathos on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, K lower left, Γ over V right, ANT in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $40.00 (€35.20)
 


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On 31 March 307, after divorcing his wife Minervina, Constantine the Great married Maximian's daughter, Fausta Flavia Maxima.
RB91858. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 228 (S), SRCV IV 13452, Cohen IV 147, Hunter V 21 var. (also laureate), Choice F, full legends, dark patina, weight 5.070 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. late summer 307 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMAINO P F S AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, chlamys around waist and over left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar to left, N right, PLC in exergue; scarce; $40.00 (€35.20)
 


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This type was apparently minted by Constantius I to provide sufficient coinage for his invasion of Britain in 296 A.D. At one time the type was attributed to the London mint, because of finds there. Learning of the invasion, Allectus' Frankish mercenaries sacked Londinium. They were stopped by the arrival of the Roman flotilla on the Thames. The Franks were slaughtered. After the return of Londinium to Roman control new elaborate and luxurious baths were constructed. The gubernatorial palace and old large forum seem to have fallen out of use around 300, but in general the first half of the 4th century appears to have been prosperous for Britain. The villa estates surrounding London flourished during this period.
RB91860. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 14b (C), Cohen VI 179, SRCV IV 13244, Hunter IV-, F, brown tone, some green patina on reverse, obverse porous, weight 10.814 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 210o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 296 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare shoulder seen from behind; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius of the Roman people standing left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera with right hand, cornucopia in left hand, no controls or mintmark; RIC V lists this type as common but market evidence indicates it is scarce or rare; $40.00 (€35.20)
 




  






|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

AVRVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOIVNAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOOPTIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOOPTIMOIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOPATRIMAXENTIVSAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOSEN
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENFORTIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOSOCEROMAXENTIVSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATIS
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISS
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSI
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSIM
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBEATISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOFELICIS
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISS
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSI
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSIM
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOPFSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOSENINVAVG
IMPCCVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCCVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVRMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMVALVAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPIAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPPAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPMAVRMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOMAXIMIANOPATRI
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOMAXIMIANOSOCERO
IMPMAXIMIANOPFSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSAVGCOSVII
IMPMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFEAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFELAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFAVGCOSVII
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIFEAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSAVGVST
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSFAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSFELIXAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSSENAVG
MAVRMAXIMIANVSSENAVG
MAXIMIANVSAVG
MAXIMIANVSAVGVSTVS
MAXIMIANVSPAVG
MAXIMIANVSPFAVG
MAXIMIANVSSENPFAVG
VIRTVSMAXIMIANIAVG


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de I'atelier de Lyon, Diocletien et ses coregents avant la reforme monetaire (285 - 294). (Wetteren, 1972).
Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Réforme Monétaire de Dioclétien à la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). (Wetteren, 1980).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien à Constantin I (284-337). Moneta 1. (Wetteren, 1995).
Gnecchi, F. I Medaglioni Romani. (Milan, 1912).
Jelocnik, A. The Sisak Hoard of Argentei of the Early Tetrarchy. (Ljubljana, 1961).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. V, |Part| II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 12, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Maximian