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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Tetrarchy
Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||follis|
Quies is the personification of rest and retirement. This coin honors the Senior Emperors Diocletian and Maximian after their abdication in 305 A.D. The obverse dedicates the coin, "to our lord Maximian the happy senior emperor." The reverse translates, "By the providence of the gods, the restful retirement of the Emperors."
RT96916. Billon follis, RIC VI Serdica p. 495, 15b; SRCV IV 13408; Cohen VI 489/493; Hunter V -, VF, well centered, spots of corrosion, encrustations and deposits, scratches, weight 8.380 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 305 - 306 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right, wearing imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left hand; reverse PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia stands left, Quies stands right holding branch and scepter, S - F at sides, A in center, •SM•SD• in exergue; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|NEW
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontier: Diocletian at Nicomedia in Bithynia (Izmit, Turkey), Maximian at Mediolanum in Italy (Milan, Italy), Constantius at Augusta Treverorum in Gallia Belgica (Trier, Germany), and Galerius at Sirmium in Pannonia (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia).
RL94881. Billon post-reform radiate, Hunter V 88 (also 5th officina), RIC VI 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, Choice gVF, nice near black desert patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, excellent portrait, well centered, weight 3.939 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, 5th Officina Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus standing right, holding short scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter; Jupiter standing left, holding long scepter in right hand, K E low center between them; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|
The officina number is expressed as E∆ (5 + 4 = 9) because Θ, theta, the Greek numeral nine, was considered unlucky. Theta (Θ), was used as an abbreviation for Thanatos (death) and used as a warning symbol of death, in the same way that skull and crossbones are used in modern times. It survives on potsherds used by Athenians voting for the death penalty. Also, after a funeral "Nine Days of Sorrow" were solemnly observed by the Roman family. Romans avoided the use of theta, as we avoid the use of the number 13 today.
RL94868. Billon follis, Hunter V 68 (also 9th officina), SRCV IV 14845, Cohen VII 47, RIC VI Antiochia 147c var. (no crescent), Choice VF, well centered, black patina with highlighting red earthen "desert patina", weight 6.809 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, 9th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 310 - 311 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO EXERCITVS (to the guardian spirit of the army), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, flaming altar at feet on left, crescent horns up upper left, E over ∆ (5+4=9) right, ANT in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA92322. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399, bust type H (S); Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, Choice aEF, much silvering, well centered, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.606 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO AVGVSTI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Augusti, the Emperors. The figure depicted is the statue of the Spirit of the Roman People which was then in the Roman Forum (it is now lost). The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted.
RT93355. Billon follis, RIC VI Alexandria 152b, SRCV IV 14841, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, gVF, dark brown patina, flow lines, porosity, slightly off center, reverse die wear, tiny edge crack, weight 5.116 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Alexandria mint, 312 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor), Genio standing facing, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, head of Serapis in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, crescent upper left, X in left field, B in right field, ALE in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis|
Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RT96899. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus 59, SRCV IV 14578, Cohen VII 231, Hunter V -, gVF, well centered, sharp portrait detail, flow lines, porosity, pin-prick pitting on reverse, reverse die wear, edge slightly ragged, weight 5.856 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint mint, Group IV, Class II, 309-10 A.D.; obverse GAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVTI EXERCITVS (courage of the army), Virtus advancing right in military dress, spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder and shield in left, A - * across fields, MKV in exergue; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontier: Diocletian at Nicomedia in Bithynia (Izmit, Turkey), Maximian at Mediolanum in Italy (Milan, Italy), Constantius at Augusta Treverorum in Gallia Belgica (Trier, Germany), and Galerius at Sirmium in Pannonia (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia).
RL94866. Billon post-reform radiate, Hunter V 83 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, Choice VF, dark green patina with highlighting "desert patina" earthen deposits, weight 4.056 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Emperor on left, standing right, wearing military dress, baton in right hand, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, Jupiter nude but for cloak on shoulders, standing left leaning on long scepter in left hand, Victory holding wreath in right hand and palm frond in left hand, KB low center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO AVGVSTI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Augusti, the Emperors.
RL94872. Billon follis, RIC VI Alexandria 162b, SRCV IV 14843, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V 126 var. ( no wreath), aVF, heavy earthen deposits, weight 5.300 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Alexandria mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor), Genius standing slightly left, kalathos on head left, head of Serapis in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star upper left, N over palm-branch left, Γ over wreath right, ALE in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|NEW
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO IMPERATORIS dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Imperators. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RL94876. Billon follis, RIC VI Antiochia 133c, Cohen VII 55, SRCV IV 14851, Hunter V 58 var. (2nd officina), VF, desert patina, well centered, weight 6.956 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 310 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO IMPERATORIS (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor as Commander in Chief), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar at feet on left, star upper left, A right, ANT in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|NEW
In 297, Maximian began an offensive against the Berbers in Mauritania, North Africa. He drove them back into their homelands in the Atlas Mountains and spent the rest of the winter in Carthage. On 10 March 298, Maximian celebrated a Triumph in Carthage to conclude his campaign.
RL94874. Copper post-reform radiate, Hunter V 83 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, aVF, desert patina, weight 2.613 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximian standing right receiving victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, KB in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50











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