Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Price Reductions

Oct 24, 2020

Oct 11, 2020

Oct 09, 2020

Oct 08, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 280 - 276 B.C., Heavy Series

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |c.| |280| |-| |276| |B.C.,| |Heavy| |Series||triens|
All the references only describe the pellets as below the dolphin. None of the references include a variation with pellets above, but Crawford and HN Italy note the dolphin is sometimes left, which may actually be describing pellets above. There are a few examples with the pellets above on Coin Archives.
RR93746. Aes grave triens, cf. Crawford 14/3; HN Italy 270; Haeberlin pp. 95- 97, pl. 39, 6 ff.; Thurlow-Vecchi 3; Sydenham 10; Vecchi ICC 27 (all with pellets below), VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, casting flaw, weight 96.948 g, maximum diameter 53.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 280 - 276 B.C.; obverse dolphin swimming right •••• (mark of value) above; reverse fulmen (thunderbolt) •••• (mark of value) perpendicular to the fulmen in center; from the Errett Bishop Collection, very rare with the pellets above the dolphin, huge AE53!; $1500.00 SALE |PRICE| $1350.00


Roman Republic, Libral Cast Series, c. 225 - 217 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Libral| |Cast| |Series,| |c.| |225| |-| |217| |B.C.||uncia|
The prow right aes grave are common in the as to sextans denominations, but scarce for uncia. This issue was followed by the prow left series, which has no uncia.
RR95368. Aes grave (cast) uncia, Crawford 35/6; Sydenham 77; Haeberlin pl. 18, 22 ff.; Thurlow-Vecchi 56; Vecchi ICC 83; HN Italy 342; RBW Collection 90, SRCV I 589, VF, dark brown patina, weight 27.834 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 225 - 217 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left, wearing a crested Attic helmet, • (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right; • (mark of value) below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Luceria, Apulia, Italy, c. 211 - 200 B.C.

|Italy|, |Luceria,| |Apulia,| |Italy,| |c.| |211| |-| |200| |B.C.||uncia|
In 321 B.C., the Romans, deceived into thinking Lucera was under siege by the Samnites, walked into an ambush and were defeated. The town threw out the Samnites, sought Roman protection, and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. To strengthen ties, 2,500 Romans moved to Lucera. Roman culture merged with the native one slowly, probably accompanied by cross-cultural marriages, but Lucera was a steadfast supporter of Rome. By the 2nd century B.C., the rustic town was transformed into a proper Roman city with houses, public buildings, paved roads, sidewalks and services for travelers, accommodation for livestock with running water, and warehouses for storing goods.
GB86125. Bronze uncia, SNG ANS 709; SNG Cop 663; SNG BnF 1368; SNG Munchen 504; HN Italy 682; BMC Italy p. 141, 62; Hunterian -, VF, rough, weight 4.084 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Luceria mint, c. 211 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver at shoulder, pellet behind; reverse LOVC-ERI, toad seen from above; very rare; $380.00 SALE |PRICE| $300.00


Pontus (Amisos?), Roman Quaestor (Lucius Lucullus?), c. 100 - 50 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Pontus| |(Amisos?),| |Roman| |Quaestor| |(Lucius| |Lucullus?),| |c.| |100| |-| |50| |B.C.||AE| |21|
The Q identifies the bare male head as a Roman Quaestor. This letter is not noted in RPC but is visible here and clear on other examples known to Forum. Perhaps the image is of Lucius Lucullus, an important Quaestor of Sulla, about whom Plutarch wrote. The reverse legend, the Latin FETIA, refers to the fetial ceremony, part of the treaty making process, during which a pig was sacrificed to sanctify the oaths. The mint location is unknown but Imhoof-Blumer placed it at Amisus, where Leypold acquired his specimen.
RP96461. Brass AE 21, RPC I 2156, SNG Leypold I p. 24, 69; Imhoof-Blumer GRMK 281, F, dark patina, flat centers, scratches, reverse die wear, reverse off center, weight 7.913 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pontos (Amisos?) mint, c. 80 B.C.(?); obverse bare male head right, Q (quaestor) below; reverse two men standing, holding a pig between them, each with a hand raised, taking an oath of fealty, FETA IA in exergue; rare; $225.00 SALE |PRICE| $195.00


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

|Italy|, |Osco-Latin,| |Central| |Italy,| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.||Aes| |Formatum|NEW
 
GA96094. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. G. Fallai, IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2e; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -, weight 22.906 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; similar bronze Aes formatum were cast in molds made from seashells, but this specimen was not cast from a mold made with a shell - the shape and lines are the work of a human hand; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Roman Republic, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||Aes| |Rude|NEW
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
RR97048. Bronze Aes Rude, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, Bertol-Farac pl. 1, SRCV I 505; maximum length 63.5mm, weight 164.4g, one side fairly flat, an edge of a large ingot., $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 211 - 206 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.||as|
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, 154 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

|Unofficial| |&| |Barbaric|, |Geto-Dacian,| |Roman| |Republic| |Imitative,| |154| |B.C.| |-| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
The Dacians had a well-established affinity for Republican denarii, used them in enormous numbers, and also minted numerous imitations. Many Roman Republic imitative types, such as this type, are found in Dacia, and nowhere else. Some Dacian imitatives were quite faithful reproductions of the Roman Republic originals. Others, such as this coin, maintain the types but deviate in style. Other Dacian imitatives markedly diverge from their Republican prototypes with more or less fanciful, stylized or "barbarous" designs, often with mismatched obverse and reverse types and blundered legends. -- Phil Davis' website, "Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" - https://rrimitations.ancients.info/
RR95316. Silver denarius, Davis -; cf. official prototype Rome mint, 154 B.C., C. Iuventius Thalna, Sydenham 379, RBW 869, Crawford 202/1a, VF, slightly crude unofficial style, light toning, tight flan, flow lines, weight 3.699 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 270o, unofficial Geto-Dacian mint, 154 BC - 1st Century A.D.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X.; reverse Victory in biga right; below, C TAL; in exergue, ROMA; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Roman Republic, Unofficial, c. 169 - 91 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Unofficial,| |c.| |169| |-| |91| |B.C.||quadrans|
Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M • and N• (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M• above; ex Forum (2006), ex Goodman collection; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $113.00


Roman Republic, M. Marcius Mn.f., 134 B.C.

|150-100| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |M.| |Marcius| |Mn.f.,| |134| |B.C.||quadrans|
The First Servile War, 135 - 132 B.C., was an unsuccessful slave rebellion against the Roman Republic. The war was prompted by slave revolts in Enna on the island of Sicily. It was led by Eunus, a former slave claiming to be a prophet, and Cleon, a Cilician (from present-day Turkey) who became Eunus's military commander. After some minor battles won by the slaves, a larger Roman army arrived in Sicily and defeated the rebels.
RR88355. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 245/3, Sydenham 501a, BMCRR I Rome 1017, RBW Collection 1011, SRCV I 1151, aF, dark green patina, corrosion, edge crack, weight 5.255 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 134 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, M MARCI / MN F (MAR and MNF ligate) in two lines above, three pellets before, ROMA in exergue; ex Rudnik Numismatics, with an old collector tag dated 30 November 1932, with the cost noted as $.25; $105.00 SALE |PRICE| $95.00










REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappιes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

Catalog current as of Monday, October 26, 2020.
Page created in 0.859 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity