Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Aug 08, 2020
Medieval & Modern Coins

Aug 04, 2020

Aug 03, 2020

Aug 01, 2020

Jul 31, 2020

Jul 30, 2020

Jul 29, 2020

Jul 28, 2020

Jul 27, 2020

Jul 26, 2020

Jul 25, 2020

Jul 24, 2020

Jul 23, 2020

Jul 22, 2020

Jul 21, 2020

Jul 20, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Justinian Dynasty||View Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Coins of the Justinian Dynasty

Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

|Justinian| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justinian| |I,| |4| |April| |527| |-| |14| |November| |565| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
The war with the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage in 533 - 534 was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals had occupied Roman North Africa in the early 5th century and established an independent kingdom. The Byzantine expeditionary force landed on the African coast in early September 533. The Vandal king Gelimer met the Byzantine army at the Battle of Ad Decimum, near Carthage, on 13 September. His elaborate plan to encircle and destroy the Byzantines came close to success, but Belisarius forced a Vandal retreat and occupied Carthage. Gelimer withdrew, gathered his remaining strength, and in December advanced towards Carthage and met the Romans at the Battle of Tricamarum. Gelimer was defeated and fled to a remote mountain fortress, where he was blockaded until he surrendered in the spring. Belisarius returned to Constantinople with the Vandals' royal treasure and the captive Gelimer to enjoy a triumph. Africa was formally restored to imperial rule as the praetorian prefecture of Africa. The new province faced war with the Moors and military rebellions, and it was not until 548 that peace was restored and Roman government firmly established.The Vandalic War in 533-534
BZ93502. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 270, Morrisson BnF I 4/An/AE/88, Wroth BMC 153, Tolstoi 467, Ratto 569, Hahn MIB I 161, SBCV 243, Sommer 4.111, Choice gVF, perfect centering, nice dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, edge cracks, weight 2.196 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Theoupolis (Antioch - Antakya, Turkey) mint, 556 - 561 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTIN-IANI P P A, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large E (5 nummi) with cross at the center, smaller OY monogram right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |follis|NEW
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. In 74 B.C. allied with Rome, it withstood a siege by 300,000 men led by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, Cyzicus was made the capital of Mysia, and afterward of Hellespontus. Gallienus opened an imperial mint at Cyzicus, which continued to strike coins well into the Byzantine era.
BZ93505. Bronze follis, DOC I 123c, Wroth BMC 180, Ratto 881, Tolstoi 149, Hahn MIB II 50b, SBCV 372, Sommer 5.31, Morrisson BnF -, Choice gF, well centered on a broad flan, brown tone, some porosity, light deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 12.903 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 574 - 575 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINVS P P AV, Justin II (on left) and Sophia seated facing on double throne, both nimbate, he holds a globus cruciger, she holds a cruciform scepter, cross above center, wavy line below feet; reverse large M (40 nummi) between ANNO and X (year 10), cross above, B (2nd officina) below, KYZ (Kyzikos) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
On 22 August 565, St. Columba first reported seeing a monster in Loch Ness, Scotland.
BZ93506. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 60b, Morrisson BnF 5/Cp/AE/55, Tolstoi 475 (Justinian), Ratto 743 (Justinian), Wroth BMC 417 (Justinian), Hahn MIB 45, SBCV 363, F, well centered, rough/porous, ragged cracked flan, weight 2.193 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 5 Oct 578; obverse IVΣTINOY KAI COΦIAC (Justin and Sophia) monogram ; reverse large E (5 nummi), smaller B (2nd officina) on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $30.00 SALE |PRICE| $27.00


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
In 570 A.D., Ctesiphon, capital of the Sassanid Empire, became the largest city of the world, taking the lead from Constantinople, capital of the Byzantine Empire.
BZ93507. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 60d, Morrisson BnF 5/Cp/AE/57, Wroth BMC 421 (Justinian), Tolstoi 477 (Justinian), Ratto 745 (Justinian), Hahn MIB II 45, SBCV 363, Sommer 5.14, F, well centered, green patina, rough, weight 0.759 g, maximum diameter 12.6 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 565 - 578 A.D.; obverse IVΣTINOY KAI COΦIAC (Justin and Sophia) monogram ; reverse large E (5 nummi), smaller ∆ (4th officina) on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $23.00 SALE |PRICE| $.99


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
BZ93508. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 116, Sommer 5.30, Morrisson BnF 5/Ni/AE/41, Wroth BMC 425 (Justinian), Tolstoi 479 (same), Ratto 748 (same), SBCV 371, Sommer 5.30, aVF, squared flan, obverse a little off center, light marks, porosity, light deposits, weight 2.548 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 5 Oct 578 A.D.; obverse IVΣTINOY KAI COΦIAC (Justin and Sophia) monogram ; reverse Large E (5 nummi), smaller N (Nikomedia) right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
BZ93509. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 116, Sommer 5.30, Morrisson BnF 5/Ni/AE/41, Wroth BMC 425 (Justinian), Tolstoi 479 (same), Ratto 748 (same), SBCV 371, Sommer 5.30, aVF, squared flan, toned, die wear, marks, light corrosion, weight 2.571 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 5 Oct 578 A.D.; obverse IVΣTINOY KAI COΦIAC (Justin and Sophia) monogram ; reverse Large E (5 nummi), smaller N (Nikomedia) right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Byzantine Empire, Tiberius II Constantine, 26 September 578 - 14 August 582 A.D.

|Tiberius| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Tiberius| |II| |Constantine,| |26| |September| |578| |-| |14| |August| |582| |A.D.|, |follis|NEW
On 14 August 582, Tiberius II Constantine died in Constantinople at age 47, possibly from deliberately poisoned food. He had reigned for four years, during which Thrace and Greece were inundated by the Slavs. He was succeeded by his son-in-law, Maurice, a former notary who commanded the Byzantine army in the war against the Persian Empire.
BZ93510. Bronze follis, DOC I 31a, Wroth BMC 70, Tolstoi 52, Hahn MIB II 35, SBCV 441, Sommer 6.17, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Choice gVF, full border centering on a broad flan, bold strike, brown tone, small edge split, weight 10.572 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 581 - 14 Aug 582 A.D.; obverse δm TIb CONSTANT P P AVG, crowned bust facing wearing consular robes, crown with cross and pendilia, mappa in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter in left hand, cross above eagle; reverse large M (40 nummi) between ANNO and ςI/I (year 8), cross above, NIKOA (Nikomedia, 1st officina) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |pentanummium|NEW
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
BZ93563. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 116, Sommer 5.30, Morrisson BnF 5/Ni/AE/41, Wroth BMC 425 (Justinian), Tolstoi 479 (same), Ratto 748 (same), SBCV 371, Sommer 5.30, aVF, well centered, spots of corrosion, earthen deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.529 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 5 Oct 578 A.D.; obverse IVΣTINOY KAI COΦIAC (Justin and Sophia) monogram ; reverse Large E (5 nummi), smaller N (Nikomedia) right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.00


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

|Justinian| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justinian| |I,| |4| |April| |527| |-| |14| |November| |565| |A.D.|, |follis|NEW
Under Justinian Nicomedia was extended with new public buildings. Situated on the roads leading to the capital, the city remained a major military center, playing an important role in the Byzantine campaigns against the Caliphate.
BZ93500. Bronze follis, DOC I 136b, Morrisson BnF I 4/Ni/AE/34, Wroth BMC 217, Tolstoi 198, Ratto 602, Hahn MIB I 113a, SBCV 201, Sommer 4.65, gVF, dark brown patina, light marks, porosity/light corrosion, edge cracks, slightly off center but on a broad flan, weight 16.565 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 556 - 557 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger (cross on orb) in right, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, cross in right field; reverse large M; A/N/N/O left; X/X/X right (regnal year 30), cross above, B (2nd officina) below, NIKO (Nicomedia) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Byzantine Empire, Focas, 23 November 602 - 5 October 610 A.D.

|Focas|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Focas,| |23| |November| |602| |-| |5| |October| |610| |A.D.|, |solidus|
In 610, Gundemar succeeded Witteric as king of the Visigoths and the Avars tried to invade Italy.
SH94504. Gold solidus, DOC II part 1, 10e.6; Wroth BMC 6; Morrisson BnF 8/Cp/AV/15; Tolstoi 9; Sommer 9.10; Hahn MIB II 11; SBCV 620; Ratto -, VF, well centered, a few scratches, light deposits, die wear, weight 4.301 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 609 - 5 Oct 610 A.D.; obverse d N N FOCAS PERP AVC, bust facing, bearded, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with cross on circlet and without pendilia, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse VICTORIA AVGY E (victory of the Emperor, 5th officina), angel standing facing, staurogram staff in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand, CONOB in exergue; from the Ray & Sophia Collection; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00











Catalog current as of Sunday, August 9, 2020.
Page created in 1.235 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity