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Ancient Greek Coins - Archaic to Imperial - Britannia to North Africa to India

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.

Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 148 - 31 B.C.

|Amphipolis|, |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia,| |c.| |148| |-| |31| |B.C.||tetrachalkon|
Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. --
GB91465. Bronze tetrachalkon, SNG Cop 85, SNG ANS 147, BMC Macedonia -, HGC 3 -, VF, green patina, scratches, crude style, weight 13.246 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 30o, Amphipolis mint, c. 148 - 32/31 B.C.; obverse Winged gorgoneion facing slightly to right; reverse Athena Nikephoros standing half left, Nike in right hand, spear and grounded shield in left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $95.00 (87.40)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|NEW
In 297, Maximian began an offensive against the Berbers in Mauritania, North Africa. He drove them back into their homelands in the Atlas Mountains and spent the rest of the winter in Carthage. On 10 March 298, Maximian celebrated a Triumph in Carthage to conclude his campaign.
RL94858. Copper post-reform radiate, Hunter V 84 ff. (also 4th officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, F+, well centered, partially uncleaned, weight 2.677 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximian standing right receiving victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, K∆ in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $45.00 (41.40)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
In 280, Julius Saturninus, the governor of Syria, was made emperor by his troops. Probus besiege him at Apamea, where he was captured and executed.
RL94802. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 921, SRCV III 11960, Cohen VI 87, Hunter IV 341, Pink VI-1 p. 40, 2, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, closed flan crack, light marks, weight 3.192 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 280 - 281 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), emperor standing right, holding eagle tipped scepter in left hand, receiving globe from Jupiter with right hand, E lower in center, XXI in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 (64.40)


Kingdom of Bosporus, Sauromates I, c. 93 - 123 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Sauromates| |I,| |c.| |93| |-| |123| |A.D.||48| |nummi|NEW
Tiberius Julius Sauromates I Philocaesar Philoromaios Eusebes (his epithets mean, lover of Caesar, lover of Rome, and the Pius) was the Roman Client King of the Bosporan Kingdom. Through his paternal grandfather, Sauromates I was a descendant of Mark Antony. Through his paternal grandfather, Sauromates I was a descendant of Greek Macedonian Kings: Antigonus I Monophthalmus, Seleucus I Nicator and Regent, Antipater. He was also a descendant of Roman Client Rulers Polemon I of Pontus, Pythodorida of Pontus and Cotys VIII of Thrace and and from the Monarchs Mithridates VI of Pontus and his first wife, his sister Laodice and the previous Bosporan King Asander.
GB93819. Bronze 48 nummi, RPC Online III 860 (16 spec.); MacDonald Bosporus 398/6; Anokhin 454; Frolova Coinage, p. 124. 3, aVF, dark garnet patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 14.001 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, 4th series, 3rd group, c. 108 - 115 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC CAYPOMTOY, diademed and draped bust right; reverse MH (48 nummi) within wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $95.00 (87.40)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 320 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |356| |-| |320| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
When Larissa ceased minting the federal coins it shared with other Thessalian towns and adopted its own coinage in the late fifth century B.C., it chose local types for its coins. The obverse depicted the local fountain nymph Larissa, for whom the town was named, probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse depicted a horse in various poses.
GS95937. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly 1432; BCD Thessaly II 312; SNG Cop 121; BMC Thessaly p. 30, 60; HGC 4 454, VF, uneven toning, bumps and marks, areas of light etching, small edge crack, weight 5.751 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing pendant earring and necklace, hair is combed back behind ampyx; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg raised, preparing to lie down, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN above and below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $350.00 (322.00)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 85 - 50 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Argos,| |Argolis,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |85| |-| |50| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS95948. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos I (LHS 96) 1178, SNG Cop 42, BMC Peloponnesus p. 145, 114; HGC 5 692 (R1), VF, well centered, old cabinet toning, flow lines, some flatness of strike, tiny edge splits, weight 2.475 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Argos mint, magistrate Hieron, c. 85 - 50 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf left; reverse large A, I-E/P-Ω/NO-Σ in three lines across field, eagle standing right on line below, all in an incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $250.00 (230.00)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 330 - 270 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Argos,| |Argolis,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |330| |-| |270| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS95949. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos I (LHS 96) 1092 (same dies); BMC Peloponnesus p. 141, 57; HGC 5 668 (S) corr., SNG Cop -, Choice VF, old cabinet toning, light marks, weight 2.704 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 90o, Argos mint, c. 330 - 270 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf at bay left; reverse large A, club below, A - P flanking above, all within an incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $360.00 (331.20)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 225 - 170 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |225| |-| |170| |B.C.||triobol|NEW
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95933. Silver triobol, Tsangari 507 (D13/R16); BCD Akarnania 472; SNG Cop III 14; BMC Thessaly p. 196, 26; HGC 4 950 (R1), aVF, attractive toning, scratches, tight flan, flan flaw rev. lower right, small edge split, weight 2.261 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 225o, Aitolian mint, c. 225 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above sloping downward parallel to boar's back, (ΠA monogram) below, ∆I and spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (184.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |-| |160| |B.C.||triobol|NEW
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95934. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1243 (D109/R181), BCD Akarnania 491, HGC 4 952, BMC Thessaly p. 196, 24 var. (Πo monogram), SNG Cop III -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, scratches, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Aitolian mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, monogram in left field, ΠO below, spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $200.00 (184.00)


Ambrakia, Epirus, Greece, c. 458 - 426 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Ambrakia,| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |c.| |458| |-| |426| |B.C.||stater|NEW
Ambracia (modern Arta) was founded as a Corinthian colony 650 - 625 B.C. Its economy was based on farmlands, fishing, timber for shipbuilding, and the exporting the produce of Epirus. In 433, Ambracia fought with Corinth at the Battle of Sybota, against the rebellious Corinthian colony of Corcyra (modern Corfu). Ambracia was besieged by Philip II and forced to accept a Macedonian garrison in 338. In 294, after 43 years of semi-autonomy, Ambracia was given by the son of Cassander to Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, who made it his capital, and adorned it with palace, temples and theaters. In the wars of Philip V of Macedon and the Epirotes against the Aetolian league (220-205) it changed sides and ultimately joined the Aetolians. Against Rome, it stood a stubborn siege, including the first known use of poison gas, against Roman siege tunnels. It was captured and plundered by Marcus Fulvius Nobilior in 189 B.C., after which it gradually fell into insignificance.Epirus and Environs
GS95936. Silver stater, Ravel Colts 22 (-/P12); Pegasi II p. 439, 8; HGC 3.1 197 (R2); BMC Corinth -; SNG Cop -, SNG Tubingen -, VF, toned, struck with worn dies, tight oval flan, weight 8.277 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Ambrakia (Arta, Greece) mint, c. 458 - 426 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying right, A below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet, no leather cap or neck guard, hair in long wavy locks over neck, all within incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $600.00 (552.00)











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