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Ancient Greek Coins - Archaic to Imperial - Britannia to North Africa to India

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.

Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||2| |prutot|NEW
Two prutot was equal to a Roman quadrans. -- Talmud Jerus., Kedushin 58d, written c. 200 A.D.
JD97695. Bronze 2 prutot, Meshorer TJC p. 222 & pl. 44, 48a; Sofaer p. 258 & pl. 207, 20; Hendin 1178; RPC Online I 4905; HGC 10 654, aF, off center, uneven strike, edge cracks, reverse edge beveled, weight 3.846 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), cross surrounded by closed diadem; reverse dish on tripod table, flanked by two straight upright palm branches; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The anchor was adopted from the Selukids, who used it to symbolize their naval strength. Anchors are often depicted upside down, as they would be seen hung on the side of a boat ready for use.
JD97705. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 69b; BMC Palestine p. 235, 39; Meshorer AJC II p. 239, 2b; Hendin 1193; RPC I 4912, VF, weight 1.605 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 - 6 B.C.; obverse HPω∆OY (of Herod), anchor with long slender arms; reverse EΘ/AN (Ethnarch), surrounded by oak wreath; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Gargara, Troas, c. 440 - 400 B.C.

|Troas|, |Gargara,| |Troas,| |c.| |440| |-| |400| |B.C.||hemiobol|NEW
Gargara, in Troas, was originally located on the heights of Mount Ida, but its citizens relocated to the foot of the mountain. In earlier times settlements relied on natural strongholds for protection against frequent attacks by marauding bands or pirates. As civilization took hold, the commercial opportunities afforded by easier access became more important.
GA97792. Silver hemiobol, unpublished in standard refs.; see Numismatik Naumann auction 88 (5 Apr 2020), 142; Savoca Numismatik auction 84 (30 Aug 2020), 97, VF, toned, a little rough, tiny edge chips, weight 0.319 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Gargara (Ayvacik, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 400 B.C.; obverse female head left; reverse Γ - A across field at center divided by an incuse "basketball" pattern divided into six compartments; extremely rare; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Judaea, Valerius Gratus, Roman Prefect Under Tiberius, 15 - 26 A.D., Unofficial(?)

|Valerius| |Gratus|, |Judaea,| |Valerius| |Gratus,| |Roman| |Prefect| |Under| |Tiberius,| |15| |-| |26| |A.D.,| |Unofficial(?)||prutah|NEW
The blundered obverse inscription indicates this specimen may be unofficial. Crude examples and even retrograde inscriptions are known for the type, and apparently official specimens. We were unable to find an example similarly as crude as this coin.

Julia on the obverse, refers to Livia, wife of Augustus and mother of Tiberius. Livia took the name Julia Augusta after Augustus died.
JD98158. Bronze prutah, cf. Hendin 1333b, Meshorer TJC 317a, RPC I 4959, Sofaer Collection 12 (all Jerusalem mint official specimens), VF, highlighting earthen deposits, ragged sprue cuts, edge split, weight 1.715 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 240o, Jerusalem (or unofficial?) mint, 15 A.D.; obverse OY/AIΛ (Greek: Julia, blundered) in two lines within wreath; reverse palm frond, flanked by L - B (year 2 of Tiberius); rare variant; $180.00 (€147.60)


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 405 - 390 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |405| |-| |390| |B.C.||AE| |9|NEW
Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess and the city are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called the King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB97790. Bronze AE 9, SNG Kayhan 147 ff., SNG München 34, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, VF/F, green patina, porous, weight 0.451 g, maximum diameter 8.8 mm, die axis 135o, Ephesos mint, c. 405 - 390 B.C.; obverse bee with curved wings, seen from above, within a linear circle; reverse head of stag right, E-Φ (Ephesos) divided across field, all within a round incuse; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||2| |prutot|NEW
Based on the fabric and style, we know that Herod used the same mint in Jerusalem as his father, Herod the Great.
JD98155. Bronze 2 prutot, cf. Meshorer TJC p. 225 & pl. 47, 70; Sofaer p. 258 & pl. 209, 68; BMC Palestine p. 231, 3; Hendin 1194; RPC I 4914, aF, highlighting earthen deposits (desert patina), small edge crack, edge chip, weight 1.767 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HRω∆ (of Herod), double cornucopia, horns parallel curved to the left, adorned with grapes; reverse EΘNP/N (Ethnarch, blundered), war galley left with aphlaston, oars, cabin, and ram; from an Israeli collection; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

|First| |Jewish| |Revolt|, |The| |First| |Jewish| |Revolt,| |66| |-| |70| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
By 68, Jewish resistance in the north had been crushed. Vespasian made Caesarea Maritima his headquarters and methodically proceeded to clear the coast. In the winter of 68, Titus set up camp at Jericho and cut off escape routes toward Jerusalem.
JD98160. Bronze prutah, Kadman III 12; Meshorer TJC 196, Hendin 1360; SNG ANS 427; Sofaer Collection pl. 222, 11, VF, highlighting earthen deposits (desert patina), reverse a little off center, obverse edge beveled, weight 3.028 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 150o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew: Year two, amphora with fluted body, narrow neck, broad rim, and two small curved handles; reverse Paleo-Hebrew: The freedom of Zion, vine leaf on small branch with tendril; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
"This reverse is modeled after the famous statue of the Spirit of the Roman People in the Roman Forum. It is unclear when this statue was last seen as it is now lost. Although the coins celebrate a wide range of spirits (e.g., Rome, Augustus, the Army, etc.), the basic design comes from the same statue...The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted." -- Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity 294-364 A.D. by Victor Failmezger
RT97966. Billon follis (large), Hunter V 46 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 70 (S), SRCV IV 14849, Cohen VII 51, Choice VF, brown patina, well centered, light marks, weight 6.387 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 311 A.D; obverse GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO IMPERATORIS (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor as Commander in Chief), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, Γ left, three pellets arranged in a vertical line in right field, MKV in exergue; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Judean Kingdom, John Hyrcanus I (Yehohanan), 134 - 104 B.C.

|John| |Hyrcanus| |I|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |John| |Hyrcanus| |I| |(Yehohanan),| |134| |-| |104| |B.C.||prutah|
John Hyrcanus was the son of Simon the Maccabee and nephew of the folk hero Judah Maccabee, the hero of the Hanukkah story. Soon after Hyrcanus assumed power, the Seleukid kingdom marched on Jerusalem. Antiochus VII and Hyrcanus I negotiated a treaty that left Hyrcanus a vassal to the Syrian king. John Hyrcanus was the first Jewish ruler to issue coins in his own name.
JD98141. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1137, Meshorer TJC I, Meshorer AJC S, HGC 10 629, F, well centered obverse, highlighting earthen deposits, reverse off center, reverse edge beveled, remnant of pre-strike casting sprue, weight 2.233 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 134 - 104 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription with wedge style script: Yehonanan the High Priest and Head of the Council of the Jews, surrounded by wreath; reverse double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Judaean Kingdom, John Hyrcanus I (Yehohanan), 134 - 104 B.C., for the Seleukid King Antiochus VII

|John| |Hyrcanus| |I|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |John| |Hyrcanus| |I| |(Yehohanan),| |134| |-| |104| |B.C.,| |for| |the| |Seleukid| |King| |Antiochus| |VII||prutah|
Struck by John Hyrcanus, King of Judaea, in the name of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII, Euergetes (Sidetes). John Hyrcanus was the son of Simon the Maccabee and nephew of the folk hero Judah Maccabee, the hero of the Hanukkah story. Soon after Hyrcanus assumed power, the Seleukid king marched on Jerusalem. Antiochus VII and Hyrcanus I negotiated a treaty that left Hyrcanus a vassal to the Syrian king. Probably as a conciliatory gesture to the Jews, the lily (a symbol of Jerusalem) replaced the head of the Seleukid king. Later, John Hyrcanus would be the first Jewish ruler to issue coins in his own name.
JD98144. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1131b, Houghton-Lorber II 2123(3), SNG Spaer 2140, Houghton CSE 833, SGCV II 7101, HGC 9 1103, Meshorer TJC p. 30, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.791 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, Jerusalem mint, 131 - 130 B.C.; obverse lily on stem with two leaves, dot border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEPΓETOY (Greek: of King Antiochus, Benefactor), anchor, upside down, BΠP (Greek: year 182 of Seleukid Era) below; from an Israeli collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00











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