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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.

Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

|Paphlagonia|, |Sinope,| |Paphlagonia,| |c.| |330| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of RŻm in 1214.
SH95239. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1481, SNG Cop 277, Rec Gen 25, HGC 7 399, SNGvA 6847, gVF, attractive style, toned, well centered, tight flan as usual for the type, some light scratches, weight 5.969 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 15o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, magistrate Agreos, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Sinope left, hair in sakkos, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace, apluster before her; reverse eagle flying right with dolphin right in talons, AΓPEΩΣ (magistrate's name) below wing, ΣINΩ below dolphin; ex Forum (2015); $680.00 SALE |PRICE| $612.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, |tetradrachm|
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS95115. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG MŁnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, F, marks and scratches, tight flan, typical high relief, weight 15.541 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 225o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $480.00 SALE |PRICE| $432.00


Selinous, Sicily, c. 540 - 415 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |Selinous,| |Sicily,| |c.| |540| |-| |415| |B.C.|, |didrachm|
The leaf/incuse didrachms of Selinus vary in the shape and features of the leaf, and the number of divisions and arrangement of the incuse. We have been unable to find an exact match to this coin.
SH95209. Silver didrachm, Arnold-Biucchi Selinus 6; HGC 2 1211 (R1); SNG ANS 679; SNG Cop 592; SNG Ash 1886; SNG Delepierre 602; Selinous Hoard pl. 2, 25; BMC Sicily p. 138, 7, VF, toned, die wear, etched surfaces, flan crack, weight 8.276 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selinus mint, c. 540 - 415 B.C.; obverse selinon (wild parsley) leaf, two tiny pellets at base of stem; reverse incuse square divided into twelve triangular alternating deeper and shallower sections; ex Forum (2017), ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $1000.00 SALE |PRICE| $900.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |diobol|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GA95210. Silver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, group A, type I, pl. V, 8; AMNG III 14; SNGvA 7390; SNG BnF 1126; SNG Ashmolean 653; SNG Cop 184; Rosen 524; SGCV II 3879, EF, well centered, dark toning, a few light marks, reverse die damaged, weight 1.230 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse janiform female heads, each wearing stephanos, with central earring; reverse head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, within incuse square; ex Forum (2018); $290.00 SALE |PRICE| $261.00


Massalia, Gaul, c. 475 - 460 B.C.

|Gaul|, |Massalia,| |Gaul,| |c.| |475| |-| |460| |B.C.|, |obol|
Massalia (Marseille) is the oldest city of modern France, and was founded around 600 BC by Greeks from the Asia Minor city of Phocaea.
GA95211. Silver obol, Chevillon OBM-1 (fig. 29); Brenot Period 2, 1; Furtwšngler Massalia, Em. VI, pl. III, 4; De La Tour 511; SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, nice metal, weight 0.889 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Massalia mint, 475 - 465/460 B.C.; obverse archaic head of Apollo left; reverse crab, M below; ex Forum (2016), ex CNG e-auction 368 (10 Feb 2016), lot 4; ex Poindessault-Vedrines (31 March 1997), lot 339.; very rare; $480.00 SALE |PRICE| $432.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, 480 - 450 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |drachm|
A gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgůs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GA95212. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 586, 42; SNG BM 157; SNG Cop 452; HGC 3.2 1323; SNG Stancomb -, aVF, some marks and scratches, weight 3.294 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse anchor flukes up, curved stock, A left, crayfish right; reverse archaic Ionian style Gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snakes for hair, large open mouth, pointed teeth, long protruding tongue, reverse is concave; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |450| |-| |400| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
During the Peloponnesian War, 431 - 404 B.C., Cyzicus was subject alternately to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GA95216. Silver hemiobol, von Fritze III 14; SNG Kayhan 57; SNG BnF 375; SNG Cop 49; BMC Mysia p. 35, 120; SNGvA -, EF, well struck and centered on a crowded flan, toned, weight 0.386 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, star of four rays above, all in incuse square; ex Forum (2015); $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, |tetradrachm|
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH95217. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG MŁnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, VF, excellent centering, tight flan, high relief, light marks, weight 17.107 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; ex Forum (2012); $1200.00 SALE |PRICE| $1080.00


Pharsalos, Thessaly, Greece, 440 - 425 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Pharsalos,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |440| |-| |425| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
Pharsalos, built on a hillside of the Narthacius Mountains, was one of the main cities in Thessaly. In the Persian Wars, Pharsalos sided with the Athenians. In the early 4th century B.C., the city was a part of the Thessalian League. Later, it joined the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip II. The area became a theater of war where the Aetolians and the Thessalians clashed with the Macedonians, especially during the Second and the Third Macedonian Wars. After the defeat of the Macedonian Kingdom, Pharsalos and the whole area became a part of the Roman Republic. Pharsalos is famous for being the scene of the final battle between Caesar and Pompey.
GS95218. Silver hemidrachm, Lavva 77b (V39/R45, this coin), SNG Lockett 1596 (same dies), Pozzi 2846 (same dies), SNG Cop 223, BCD Thessaly 2012 664.2, VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, bumps and marks, some porosity, weight 2.895 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 270o, Pharsalos (Farsala, Greece) mint, 440 - 425 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with raised cheek-piece, adorned with scroll, wearing earring; reverse Φ−A−P−Σ (clockwise from upper left, P and Σ reversed), horse's head and neck right, head turned slightly facing, concave field; ex Forum (2018), ex BCD Collection with his round tag noting "Found at Sestussa, bt. Sept í93 SFr. 150-"; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Neapolis, Macedonia, 424 - 350 B.C.

|Other| |Macedonia|, |Neapolis,| |Macedonia,| |424| |-| |350| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
Neapolis, Macedonia (Kavala, Greece today), was founded by settlers from Thasos near the end of the 7th century B.C., to exploit the rich gold and silver mines of the area. At the end of the 6th century B.C. Neapolis ("new city" in Greek) claimed its independence from Thasos and struck its own silver coins with the head of Gorgon. A member of the Athenian League, Neapolis was besieged by the allied armies of the Spartans and the Thasians in 411 B.C., during the Peloponnesian War, but remained faithful to Athens. The Apostle Paul landed at Neapolis on his second and third missionary journeys.
GS95219. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 229 (same dies); SNG ANS 457 (same); AMNG III-2 9; BMC Macedonia p.85, 17; HGC 3 588, VF, well centered, toned, etched surfaces, closed crack, weight 1.603 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Neapolis mint, 424 - 350 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) tongue protruding; reverse diademed female (nymph?) head right, NEOΠ downward on right, convex fields; ex Forum (2018); $175.00 (Ä157.50)











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