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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |Germanic Tribes||View Options:  |  |  | 

Germanic Tribes - Vandals, Goths, Gepids, Lombards, and Other Barbarian Invaders
Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 429 - 534 A.D.

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Vandal| |Kingdom,| |North| |Africa,| |429| |-| |534| |A.D.||AE| |9|NEW
In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Convicted of treason, rather than surrender for execution, the Roman general Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals ruled North Africa until the Byzantine Romans recaptured it in 534.
ME93386. Bronze AE 9, cf. Wroth BMCV 188, pl. iv, 39, F, earthen encrusted, weight 0.805 g, maximum diameter 8.5 mm, Carthage mint, 429 - 534 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust right; reverse cross (in wreath?); $90.00 (€73.80)
 


Kingdom of the Gepids, Thrasaric, c. 491 - 504 A.D., In the Name of Anastasius and Theodoric the Great

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Kingdom| |of| |the| |Gepids,| |Thrasaric,| |c.| |491| |-| |504| |A.D.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Anastasius| |and| |Theodoric| |the| |Great||quarter| |siliqua|
The Gepids were an East Germanic tribe who lived in the area of modern Romania, Hungary and Serbia, roughly between the Tisza, Sava and Carpathian mountains. They were closely related to, or a subdivision of, the Goths. They are first mentioned by Roman sources in the third century. In the 4th century, they were incorporated into the Hunnic Empire. After the death of Attila, the Gepids under Ardaric, led an alliance and defeated the sons of Attila at the Battle of Nedao in 454. The Gepids and their allies subsequently founded kingdoms on the Middle Danube, bordering on the Roman Empire. The Gepid Kingdom was one of the most important and long-lasting of these, centered on Sirmium, and sometimes referred to as Gepidia. In 489, Gepids lost Sirmium to the Ostrogoths. Thraustila's son, Thrasaric, regained control of Sirmium, but under Ostrogothic overlordship. In 504, Theoderic the Great expelled the Gepids from Sirmium without much resistance. The kingdom ceased to exist after they were defeated by the Lombards and Avars in 567.Gepids
JD97408. Silver quarter siliqua, Demo 77 var. (legend variations), VF+, centered, toned, edge bend, edge chips, weight 0.820 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, c. 491 - 504 A.D.; obverse D N ANASTASIVS P AV (N's inverted, A's appearing as Λ), diademed and cuirassed bust of Anastasius right; reverse * V INVICTA + A ROMANI (first N inverted, A's appearing as Λ), monogram of Theodoric, cross above, star below; ex Roma Numismatics; rare; SOLD


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 427 - 534 A.D.

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Vandal| |Kingdom,| |North| |Africa,| |427| |-| |534| |A.D.||4| |nummi|
The 4 nummi was 1/1000 of a gold tremisis.

In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general Aëtius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME89613. Bronze 4 nummi, MEC I 51 - 56 (Carthage semi-autonomous municipal coinage); Wroth BMCV p. 7, 12 - 14 (Hunneric, 477 - 484 A.D.); MIB I 20 (Gelimer, 530 - 533 A.D.), VF, highlighting red earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center, weight 1.161 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 480 - 533 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding palm frond; reverse N / IIII (mark of value) in two lines across field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 989 (notes export permit was approved by the Israel Antiquities Authority); rare; SOLD










REFERENCES|

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