Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Oct 17, 2019
Medieval & Modern Coins

Oct 16, 2019

Oct 15, 2019

Oct 14, 2019

Oct 13, 2019

Oct 12, 2019

Oct 11, 2019

Oct 10, 2019

Oct 09, 2019

Oct 08, 2019

Oct 07, 2019

Oct 05, 2019

Oct 04, 2019

Oct 03, 2019

Oct 02, 2019

Oct 01, 2019

Sep 30, 2019
Greek Coins

Sep 29, 2019

Sep 28, 2019

Sep 27, 2019
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Secessionist Empires||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Secessionist Empires

Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS91836. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 316, RIC IV 213d, Elmer 568, Cunetio 2454, Schulzki AGK 49, SRCV III 10964, Hunter IV 96 var. (no P), VF, some silvering, flow lines, slightly off center, encrustations, die wear, edge crack, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse ORIENS AVG (the rising sun of the Emperor), Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding sunrise, whip in left hand, P left; $40.00 (€35.20)


Gallic Empire, Tetricus I, mid 271 - Spring 274 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RB89976. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 56, SRCV III 11232, Cohen VI 17, Hunter IV 4, gVF, nice portrait, centered on a tight flan, flow lines, small green encrustations, small edge cracks, weight 3.964 g, maximum diameter 19.44 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C TETRICVS P F AVG, radiate, draped bust right; reverse COMES AVG (companion of the Emperor), Victory standing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; $80.00 (€70.40)


Gallic Empire, Tetricus I, mid 271 - Spring 274 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RA91624. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 80, Cohen VI 57, Hunter III 16, SRCV III 11237, VF, well centered, attractive portrait, nice dark brown patina, light marks, minor encrustations, reverse die wear, small edge splits, weight 3.262 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Mainz or Treveri (Trier) mint, 273 - 274 A.D.; obverse IMP TETRICVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse HILARITAS AVGG, Hilaritas standing left, long branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $90.00 (€79.20)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 268, Gallienus was killed by his own senior officers at Mediolanum (Milan) while besieging his rival Aureolus, one of the Thirty Tyrants. Aureolus was murdered in turn by the Praetorian guard.
RA89652. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 97, Cunetio 2453 (511 spec.), Schulzki AGK 53, RSC IV 215c, Elmer 566 (267), RIC V-2 318, SRCV III 10967, VF, excellent centering, nice portrait, much silvering, ragged edge with splits and flan cracks, weight 2.326 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Cologne (Germany) mint, 6th series, c. mid - late 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, P in left field; ex Beast Coins; $65.00 (€57.20)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS89653. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 9, Elmer 586, RIC V-2 287, RSC IV 31a, Mairat 168 - 171, Hunter IV 42, SRCV III 10932, Cunetio -, VF, well centered, traces of silvering, edge a little ragged with small splits and crack, reverse struck with a very worn die, weight 3.184 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COS IIII (consul for the 4th time), Victory standing right, raising wreath in right hand, long grounded palm frond in right hand before her; ex Beast Coins; $70.00 (€61.60)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS89654. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 9, Elmer 586, RIC V-2 287, RSC IV 31a, Mairat 168 - 171, Hunter IV 42, SRCV III 10932, Cunetio -, VF, well centered, some silvering, edge splits, die wear, weight 2.914 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COS IIII (consul for the 4th time), Victory standing right, raising wreath in right hand, long grounded palm frond in right hand before her; ex Beast Coins; $70.00 (€61.60)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 268, Gallienus was killed by his own senior officers at Mediolanum (Milan) while besieging his rival Aureolus, one of the Thirty Tyrants. Aureolus was murdered in turn by the Praetorian guard. Postumus assumed his fifth consulship on 1 January 269, but the army in Germania Superior raised a usurper in early 269. Laelianus, one of Postumus’ top military leaders and the governor of Germania Superior, was declared emperor in Mogontiacum (Mainz) by the local garrison and surrounding troops. Although Postumus was able to capture Mogontiacum and kill Laelianus within a few months, he was unable to control his own troops, who wished to put Mogontiacum to the sack. When Postumus tried to restrain them, his men turned on him and killed him.
RA89655. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 97, Cunetio 2453 (511 spec.), Schulzki AGK 53, RSC IV 215c, Elmer 566 (267), RIC V-2 318, SRCV III 10967, VF, nice portrait, some silvering, flow lines, tight flan, ragged edge, weight 3.517 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, P in left field; ex Beast Coins; $60.00 (€52.80)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 265, Gallienus launched a campaign to defeat Postumus. Postumus escaped the first assault due to the carelessness of Aureolus, Gallienus' cavalry commander. Gallienus led the second campaign himself but was wounded and forced to withdraw. By the end of 265, Postumus' coins proudly announced his victory.
RA89975. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 311, RSC IV 161a, Schulzki AGK 39, Elmer 571, Cunetio 2468, Mairat 205 - 207, SRCV III 10955, Hunter IV - (p. xci), VF, excellent portrait, choice obverse, light marks, reverse die wear, edge split, tiny encrustations, weight 3.247 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse IOVI VICTORI (Jove the victorious), Jupiter in fighting attitude, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and flying behind on left, head right, hurling thunderbolt with right hand, long scepter transverse in left; $50.00 (€44.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 267 A.D., the Goths, originally from Scandinavia, along with the Sarmatians, originally from the area of modern Iran, first invaded the Empire. They ravaged Moesia, Thrace, the Balkans and Greece. In southern Greece, the cities they sacked included Athens, Corinth, Argos and Sparta. An Athenian militia force of 2,000 men, under the historian Dexippus, pushed the invaders north where they were intercepted by the Roman army under Gallienus. Gallienus defeated them near the Nestos River, on the boundary between Macedonia and Thrace.
RS91609. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 331a, RIC V-2 325, Hunter IV 79, Elmer 593, Mairat 143, Schulzki AGK 77, Cunetio 2444, SRCV III 10983, VF, nice white metal, excellent portrait, toned, flow lines, a few tiny encrustations, edges a little ragged, weight 3.175 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from the front; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS (era of good fortune), Postumus standing right, bare-headed, wearing military attire, transverse spear in right hand, globe in extended left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $90.00 (€79.20)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Londinium (London today), established around 43 A.D., was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin.Londinium
RA91642. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 128; RIC V-2 101; Hunter IV 36; SRCV IV 13639A; Cohen VII 193, VF, nice portrait, a little rough, ragged edge, weight 4.774 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 289 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, F - O flanking at sides, ML in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $160.00 (€140.80)











Catalog current as of Thursday, October 17, 2019.
Page created in 3.485 seconds.
Secessionist Empires