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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Philip I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab" was the Praetorian Prefect and the successor to Gordian III, whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign, the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D., a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.||sestertius|NEW
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RB96538. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 166a, Hunter III 89, SRCV III 8987, Cohen V 10 corr. (AEQVITAS AVG in error), aVF, nice portrait, near full legends on tight flan, edge flaws, weight 17.973 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVGG (equity of the two emperors), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking at feet; $60.00 (€55.20)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab" was the Praetorian Prefect and the successor to Gordian III, whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign, the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D., a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.
RX93392. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 3740, Geissen 2733 var. (obv. legend), BMC 1995 var. (same), Dattari 4936 var. (same) Kampmann 74.74 var. (same), VF, centered, porous, corrosion, edge flaw, edge crack, weight 10.336 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 247 - 28 Aug 248 A.D.; obverse A K M IOV ΦIΛIΠΠOC E, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse eagle standing left, wings closed, head right, wreath in beak, L - E (year 5) divided across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 (€64.40)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
In 249 A.D., in Alexandria, the populace pillaged the homes of Christians.
RX92527. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari-Savio 10898; Milne 3772; RPC Online VIII U2642; Geissen 2746 var. (obv. leg.); BMC Alexandria p. 258, 1997 var. (same); Emmett 3442/6 (R1), VF, well centered, porous/rough, light corrosion, small edge splits, weight 11.404 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Sep 248 - 28 Sep 249 A.D.; obverse A K M IOV ΦIΛIΠΠOC EV CE, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse eagle standing left, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, L - S (year 6) flanking across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $65.00 (€59.80)
 










OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCAESMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPCMIVLPHILLIPVSPFAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELIXAVGPM
IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVGMIVLPHILIPPVSNC


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Bland, R. "Dr. Bland's List for Philip I and Family" - http://ettuantiquities.com/Philip_1/Philip1-Bland-list.htm
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, vol. 2: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Göbl, R. "Römischer Münzhort Tulln 1966 (Septimius Severus - Gallienus)" in NZ 83 (1969). pp. 7-57, pl. 1-48.
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Muona, J. "The Antoniniani of Philip the Arab" in The Celator, Feb. 2002, p. 10.
Muona, J. "The Imperial mints of Philip the Arab" - https://www.forumancientcoins.com/Articles/Philip_Arab/index.html
Óvári, F. "Philippus antiochiai veretu antoninianusairól" in Numizmatikai Közlöny 88/89 (1989/90), pp. 41 - 48.
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Thibaut, M. Antoniniani from the Mint of Antioch Under the Reign of Philip the Arab (244-249 AD) - http://marchal.thibaut.free.fr/e_index.htm
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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