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Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia
Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Frhe| |Mnzprgung| |Vom| |Kimmerschen| |Bosporus|
The early coinage of the Cimmerian Bosporus (mid-6th to early 4th century BC): The coins of the cities Pantikapaion, Theodosia, Nymphaion, and Phanagoria, and also the Sindi.
BK13181. Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus by Nina A Frolova, 2004, in German, 100 pages, new, priced below FORVM's cost!; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Gordian III and Tranquillina, May 241 - 25 February 244 A.D., Anchialos, Thrace

|Anchialus|, |Gordian| |III| |and| |Tranquillina,| |May| |241| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Anchialos,| |Thrace||AE| |27|
Anchialus (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) was 15 km north of Apollonia on the opposite coast of the Gulf of Burgas. Ovid wrote of the fortified walls of Anchialus in 9 A.D., en route to Tomis. Anchialos thrived in the 2nd and 3rd centuries serving as the most important import and export station of Thrace and acquired the appearance of a Roman city under the Severan Dynasty.
RP110450. Bronze AE 27, Tachev Anchialos pl. 156, 220; RPC Online VII-2 1136; AMNG II 662; BMC Thrace -; SNG Cop -, aVF, obverse off center, some porosity, central dimples, weight 12.403 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 195o, Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, May 241 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOR∆IANOC AYΓ CAB, confronted busts of Gordian III, on left, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Tranquillina, on right, draped and wearing stephane, TPANKVΛΛ/INA (in two lines below); reverse OYΛΠIANWN AΓXIAΛ,EWN (NWN ligate, EWN in exergue and WN ligate), Athena seated left, helmeted, patera in right hand, inverted spear in left hand, round shield at side; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Kings of Thrace, Kotys and Rhaescuporis I, c. Late Summer of 42 B.C., Struck by Brutus(?)

|Kingdoms| |of| |Thrace|, |Kings| |of| |Thrace,| |Kotys| |and| |Rhaescuporis| |I,| |c.| |Late| |Summer| |of| |42| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Brutus(?)||AE| |16|
In late summer of 42 B.C., Brutus struck aureus and denarius types (Crawford 505/4 and Crawford 505/5) with trophy reverses very similar to the reverse of this coin. This type, struck in the names of King Kotys and King Rhaescuporis of Thrace, may have actually been struck by Brutus too. Perhaps it was used for small change in the camps of Thracian mercenaries. Brutus was defeated at Philippi in October.
RP110441. Bronze AE 16, RPC Online I 1703, (description corr. post publication) Youroukova 157, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, dark green patina, a little rough, minor adjustment marks on rev., die wear, tiny edge splits, weight 4.000 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Thrace, uncertain mint, c. late summer 42 B.C.; obverse BAΣIΛEYΣ KOTYΣ, diademed and draped bust of Kotys to right; reverse BAΣIΛEYΣ PAIΣKOYΠOPI∆OΣ, trophy composed of captured arms, with spears and a Gallic shield ; ex Nomos Obolos 21 (2 Jan 2022), lot 140; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces I, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D., Augustus Reverse

|Kingdoms| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Rhoemetalces| |I,| |c.| |11| |B.C.| |-| |12| |A.D.,| |Augustus| |Reverse||AE| |21|
When the Cotys VII, King of Thrace, died about 48 B.C. Rhoemetalces I became the guardian of his nephew Rhescuporis I, his brother's young son and heir. In 13 B.C., Rhescuporis I was defeated and slain in battle by Vologases, chief of the Thracian Bessi, who was leading a revolt against Rome. As Rhescuporis I had left no heir, Rhoemetalces became king. An ally of Augustus, the Roman Historian Tacitus described Rhoemetalces as attractive and civilized. After his death, Augustus divided his realm, half for his son Cotys VIII and the other half for Rhoemetalces' brother Rhescuporis II. Tacitus states that Cotys received the cultivated parts, most towns and most Greek cities of Thrace, while Rhescuporis received the wild and savage portion with enemies on its frontier.
RP110125. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1718; Youroukova 194; BMC Thrace p. 209, 7; SNG Cop 1192; SNG Tb 974; SNG Evelpidis 1124, aVF, well centered on a full flan, earthen deposits, weight 4.795 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ POIMHTAΛKOY, diademed head of Rhoemetalces I right; reverse KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Augustus right; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Kings of Thrace, Adaios, c. 255 - 245 B.C.

|Kingdoms| |of| |Thrace|, |Kings| |of| |Thrace,| |Adaios,| |c.| |255| |-| |245| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Adaios probably served as a Seleukid strategos (military governor) of Thrace under the King Antiochos II Theos. Antiochos II took Thracian territory from Ptolemy II Philopator, c. 255 - 253 B.C., during the Second Syrian War. After Antiochos II and Ptolemy II made peace. Adaios continued to rule southern Thrace, making Kypsela his capital. Adaios was executed at Kypsela by Ptolemy III Euergetes after Ptolemy advanced into southern Thrace, c. 246 - 241 B.D., during the Third Syrian War.

This type was the largest of three bronze denominations Adaios issued. References list the lower monogram only as Σ, but on better specimens the AΣ monogram is clear.
GB110080. Bronze AE 22, SNG Tb 971; SNG Cop 1179; SNG BM 324; HGC 3.2 1763 (S); Peter p. 237; AMNG III-2 p. 147, 17 var. (monograms), VF, nice green patina, monograms and inscription not fully struck, weight 8.717 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 315o, Kypsela (near Ipsala, Turkey) mint, c. 255 - 245 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod lebes, HP over AΣ monograms downward on left, A∆AIOY downward on right; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Byzantion, Thrace, Late 3rd - 2nd Century B.C., Alliance with Kalchedon, Bithynia

|Byzantion|, |Byzantion,| |Thrace,| |Late| |3rd| |-| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Alliance| |with| |Kalchedon,| |Bithynia||AE| |27|
Byzantion was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 657 B.C. The city was rebuilt as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Constantine I in 330 A.D. and renamed Constantinople. It became the capital of the Ottoman Empire when it was conquered in 1453. Today it is Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey, and the country's economic, cultural, and historical heart.
GB110075. Bronze AE 27, Schnert-Geiss Byzantion 1271 - 1275; SNG Cop 530; MacDonald Hunter p. 398, 2; HGC 3.2 1428 (R1), aVF, rough corrosion, weight 10.658 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Byzantion (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, late 3rd-2nd centuries B.C.; obverse veiled head of Demeter right, wearing wreath of grain; reverse Poseidon seated right on rock, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, raising aphlaston (apluster) in extended right hand, transverse trident in left hand over left shoulder, inner right, BYZAN downward on right, KAΛXA downward on left; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Byzantion, Thrace, Late 3rd - 2nd Century B.C., Alliance with Kalchedon, Bithynia

|Byzantion|, |Byzantion,| |Thrace,| |Late| |3rd| |-| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Alliance| |with| |Kalchedon,| |Bithynia||AE| |26|
Byzantion was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 657 B.C. The city was rebuilt as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Constantine I in 330 A.D. and renamed Constantinople. It became the capital of the Ottoman Empire when it was conquered in 1453. Today it is Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey, and the country's economic, cultural, and historical heart.
GB110076. Bronze AE 26, Schnert-Geiss Byzantion 1257 - 1262; SNG Cop 530; MacDonald Hunter p. 398, 2; HGC 3.2 1428 (R1), VF, corrosion, weight 10.392 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Byzantion (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, late 3rd-2nd centuries B.C.; obverse veiled head of Demeter right, wearing wreath of grain; reverse Poseidon seated right on rock, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, raising aphlaston (apluster) in extended right hand, transverse trident in left hand over left shoulder, ∆A inner right, BYZAN downward on right, KAΛXA downward on left; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Byzantion, Thrace, Late 3rd - 2nd Century B.C., Alliance with Kalchedon, Bithynia

|Byzantion|, |Byzantion,| |Thrace,| |Late| |3rd| |-| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Alliance| |with| |Kalchedon,| |Bithynia||AE| |24|
Byzantion was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 657 B.C. The city was rebuilt as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Constantine I in 330 A.D. and renamed Constantinople. It became the capital of the Ottoman Empire when it was conquered in 1453. Today it is Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey, and the country's economic, cultural, and historical heart.
GB110077. Bronze AE 24, Schnert-Geiss Byzantion 1283 - 1289; SNG BM Black Sea 81; HGC 3.2 1427 (R2), VF, small areas of corrosion, flaw on chin, weight 5.621 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Byzantion (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, late 3rd-2nd centuries B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod, BYZANT downward on right, KAΛXA∆ downward on left; very rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

|Hadrianopolis|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Hadrianopolis,| |Thrace
||AE| |27|
Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
RP99994. Bronze AE 27, Jurukova Hadrianopolis 369/2 (V186/R358); Varbanov II 3512 (same dies) (R6); cf. Moushmov 2634 (l.d.c.); SNG Hunterian -; BMC Thrace -, VF, near centered, green patina, earthen deposits, bumps, scratches, central depressions, weight 12.891 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, c. 210 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AYP CEVH ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Caracalla on horse rearing right, preparing to hurl spear at fallen enemy to lower right, soldier behind horse standing right; $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Perinthus, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Perinthus,| |Thrace||AE| |22|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself. In 46 A.D., after the death of the Thracian king Rhoemetalces III and after an unsuccessful anti-Roman revolt, the Thracian Kingdom was annexed by Claudius as the Roman province of Thracia. Perinthus was made the capital of Roman Thracia.
RP99960. Bronze AE 22, Schnert-Geiss Perinthos 342; RPC Online III 694; Varbanov III 69 (R3); BMC Thrace p. 149, 19, VF, nice green patina, areas of mild corrosion, earthen encrustations, rev. slightly off center, weight 7.549 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Perinthus mint, 98 - 102 A.D.; obverse AY K NE TPAIANOIΣ ΣEBA Γ, radiate head right; reverse ΠEPIN-ΘIΩN, Tyche-Fortuna standing left, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00











Catalog current as of Saturday, November 26, 2022.
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