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Ancient Coins of Greece

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, tetradrachm
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS94305. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, F, high relief, toned, rough, lamination defects, test cut, edge split, weight 16.934 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $260.00 SALE |PRICE| $234.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, tetradrachm
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS94307. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, F, high relief, centered on a tight flan, uneven tone, rough, test cut, edge split, weight 16.968 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $260.00 SALE |PRICE| $234.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, tetradrachm
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH94261. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, Choice VF, near full crest, well centered, high relief as usual for the type, flow lines, light marks, weight 17.172 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 330o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 83 (1 Sep 2019), lot 157; $1175.00 SALE |PRICE| $1058.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.|, trichalkon
According to mythology, Larissa was founded by Acrisius, who was killed accidentally by his grandson, Perseus; the nymph Larissa was a daughter of the primordial man Pelasgu; Achilles was born at Larissa, and Hippocrates, the "Father of Medicine"; died there. Today, Larissa is the capital and largest city of the Thessaly region and an important commercial, agricultural, and industrial center of Greece.
GB92063. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly 1172.1 (same countermark), BCD Thessaly II 394.1 (same countermark), SNG Cop 147, Rogers 309, HGC 4 530 (S), BMC Thessaly -, VF, well centered, attractive dark patina, interesting countermark, some flatness of strike, edge crack, beveled obverse edge; c/m: VF, weight 11.952 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 300 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa right, monogram behind; countermark on cheek: spiked helmet with visor, neck and cheek guards in a c. 6mm oval punch; reverse cavalryman prancing right, wearing spiked helmet, couched lance in right hand, star upper left, ΛA-PI/ΣNΩN divided above and below; ex Numismatik Lanz München, auction 112 (25 Nov 2002), 193; scarce; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 337 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |356| |-| |337| |B.C.|, tetrachalkon
After 344, Larissa fell under Macedonian rule. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well-known for its horses.
GB92101. Bronze tetrachalkon, BCD Thessaly II 387.8, Rogers 273, Weber 2864, HGC 4 517, F, dark patina, some corrosion/porosity, obverse edge beveled, weight 9.307 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 337 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing necklace, drop earrings, and ampyx; reverse ΛAPI−Σ−AIΩN (starting upper left, Σ downward on right, ending in exergue, N retrograde), bridled horse trotting right without rider, E above left, stalk of grain below diagonal with top left; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Phokis, Greece, Phokian League Federal Coinage, Late 4th or Early 3rd Century B.C.

|Phokis|, |Phokis,| |Greece,| |Phokian| |League| |Federal| |Coinage,| |Late| |4th| |or| |Early| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.|, AE 14
BCD writes of this and similar types with Athena on the obverse and the abbreviated ethnic in a wreath on the reverse, "It is hoped that the multitude of styles and the differences in the fabric and flan evident amongst these coins will help vindicate the writer's believe that we are dealing with an assortment of types that were struck on odd occasions and within a time span of more than a century." Kroll dates this type (based on the Agora deposit A18: 8 [IGCH 157]) to "early third century BC, in any case well after the Third Sacred War."
GB93474. Bronze AE 14, BCD Lokris 358.4 ff. (no die matches); SNG Cop 117; BMC Central Greece p. 20, 76; HGC 4 1114, gVF, light deposits, die wear, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 90o, Phokis mint, late 4th or early 3rd century B.C.; obverse head and neck of Athena, facing slightly right, helmeted; reverse ΦΩ within wreath without berries, tied below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

|Boiotia|, |Thespiai,| |Boiotia,| |Greece,| |146| |-| |27| |B.C.|, AE 16
Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period, Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB93470. Bronze AE 16, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; De Luynes 2012; HGC 4 1408 (S), aVF, dark tone, highlighting chalky deposits, porous, weight 4.152 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 225o, Thespiai (near Thespies, Greece) mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing veil, veiled bust right; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Krannon, Thessaly, Greece, 350 - 300 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Krannon,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|, dichalkon
In 322 B.C., at Krannon, Thessaly, the Macedonian general Antipater decisively defeated an anti-Macedonian alliance of the Athenians, Aetolians, Thessalians, the Phoceans, the Lokrians and some Peloponnesian states. After the defeat, Athens was forced to abolish its democracy, the leaders responsible for the war were sentenced to death and a Macedonian garrison was stationed at the port of Mounychia.
GB92183. Bronze dichalkon, Rogers 199; BMC Thessaly p. 16, 5 var. (no obv letter); SNG Cop 43 var. (same); SGCV I 2073, aVF, dark patina, minor earthen deposits, weight 4.923 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Krannon mint, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys, K (control symbol) upper left; reverse K-PA/NNO, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 165 (17 Mar 2008), part of lot 2515; $85.00 SALE |PRICE| $76.50


Itanos, Crete, c. 320 - 270 B.C.

|Crete|, |Itanos,| |Crete,| |c.| |320| |-| |270| |B.C.|, AE 17
The ancient Itanos was one of the strongest cities in Crete in Hellenistic and Roman times. The city flourished due to fishing, and its trade in glass and Tyrian purple die. Koufonissi Island, owned by Itanos, was famous the purple die made from shellfish. The nearby temple of Diktaean Zeus also brought pilgrims and the tourist trade. An earthquake in 795 precipitated a significant decline. An Arab attack in the 9th century destroyed much of the city, but Itanos was not abandoned until the 15th century, when successive Arab raids forced its residents to abandon the coast and move inland.
GB92189. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos Numismatique 42, SNG Cop -, BMC Crete -, F, brown patina, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 2.987 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, Itanos (near Paalekastro, Eastern Crete) mint, c. 320 - 270 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena left; reverse sixteen-pointed star with pellet-in-annulet at center; ex CNG e-auction 246 (15 Dec 2010), lot 84; only two sales of this type (and one is this coin) recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 440 - 420 B.C.

|Phokis|, |Phokis,| |Greece,| |Federal| |Coinage,| |c.| |440| |-| |420| |B.C.|, triobol
Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
GS92199. Silver triobol, cf. BCD Locris 257 ff., SNG Cop 99 ff., HGC 4 1043 (R2), F, obverse with dark thick toning, reverse lightly toned, light marks and scratches, minor encrustations, weight 2.727 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 180o, Phokis mint, c. 440 - 420 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse ΦOKI, head of Artemis right, all within incuse square; ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00










REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Friday, February 21, 2020.
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