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Ancient Coins of Macedonia

The Perrhaiboi, Thessaly, Greece, c. Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.

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The Perrhaiboi were a Pelasgian (indigenous non-Greek) tribal people who lived in Perrhaibia, north of Thessaly proper and bordering Macedonia. Their capital was Phalanna, and their most significant town was Olosson. In the Iliad, Homer wrote of "the valiant Perrhaiboi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresios, which sends its waters into the Peneus." The Perrhaiboi fought in the Battle of Thermopylae. Through most of their history they were overshadowed and controlled by Thessaly, although they had two votes at the Delphic Amphictyony. Philip II of Macedon took their kingdom and it remained under Macedonian control until the Roman conquest in 196 B.C.
GB76999. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1247 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 561; Rogers 440, fig. 239; SNG Cop 197, HGC 4 157, aVF, well centered, some corrosion, weight 6.372 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Olosson or Phalanna mint, c. late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right, wearing oak wreath; reverse ΠEPPAI/BΩN (in two lines, starting upward from lower left, ending downward on right), Hera seated right on backless throne, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, resting left hand on knee, no magistrate name or initials; $135.00 (€114.75)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 320 B.C.

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The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
GS86544. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly I 1156; BMC Thessaly p. 30, 61; HGC 4 454; BCD Thessaly II 323 var. (same obv. die, trident head left control), VF, toned, etched surfaces, tight flan, small edge cracks, weight 5.869 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, pendant earring represented by three pellets in a vertical line, and simple necklace; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg bent and raised, preparing to roll onto the ground, small plant (control) below, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN in two lines, the first above, second in exergue; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $380.00 (€323.00)


Homolion, Magnesia, Thessaly, Greece, Mid 4th Century B.C.

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Homolion was at the foot of Mount Homole but its exact location is still unknown. On the way to Troy, Philoktetes, the king of Homolion and the surrounding area, was bitten by a snake. The stench of his festering wound was so bad that Odysseus and his other companions stranded him on the island of Lemnos. Later they learned from prophesy that they could not take Troy without the bow and arrows of Herakles, which Philoktetes possessed. Odysseus and a group of men rushed back to Lemnos to recover Heracles' weapons. Surprised to find the him alive, the Greeks balked on what to do next. Odysseus tricked the weaponry away from Philoktetes, but Diomedes refused to take the weapons without the man. Herakles came down from Olympus and told Philoktetes to go, that he would be healed and win great honor as a hero. Outside Troy one of sons Asclepius healed his wound. Philoktetes was among those chosen to hide inside the Trojan Horse, and during the sack of the city he killed many famed Trojans.
GB85920. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 91 (same dies), Rogers 259, SNG Cop 73 var. (T behind head on obv.), HGC 4 87 (S), BCD Thessaly I -, BMC Thessaly -, VF, well centered and struck, dark patina, marks, corrosion, weight 10.111 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 270o, Homolion (near Omolio, Larissa, Greece) mint, mid 4th century B.C.; obverse head of Philoktetes left, bearded, wearing pilos; reverse OMOΛ-IEΩN (clockwise starting at 9:00), coiled serpent, erect head right, behind his head a small bunch of grapes; ex BCD Collection with his tag; ex Munzhandlung Ritter list 65 (Mar 2004), lot 614 (€140); very rare this nice; $140.00 (€119.00)


Halos, Thessaly, Greece, c. 302 - 265 B.C.

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Athamas, the mythical founder of Halos, had two children with his first wife, Nephele, Phrixus and Helle. Athamas' second wife Ino, jealous for her own two children with Athamas pretended that an oracle demanded that Phrixus and Helle must be sacrificed to Zeus. Just as the sacrifice was prepared, the cloud nymph Nephele descended and placed the children on a ram with a golden fleece given to her by Hermes. The ram flew off to safety but Helle fell off and drowned in the Hellespont, which was named for the accident. Phrixus landed in Colchis, sacrificed the ram to Zeus and hung up the fleece, where Jason would later obtain it.
GB85921. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1057; BCD Thessaly II 85; Reinder series 6; Rogers 241, fig. 114; SNG Cop 63; HGC 4 4 (R1), VF, well centered and struck on a tight flan, dark blue-green patina, marks, porosity, weight 5.788 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Halos (near Almyros, Greece) mint, c. 302 - 265 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse AΛEΩN (counterclockwise starting lower left), Phrixos clinging to neck and chest of the golden ram flying right, nude but for cloak billowing behind him like wings, (AX monogram) upper left; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "V. ex. Thess., May 93, DM 108.-"; rare; $200.00 (€170.00)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH86507. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, VF, well centered on a tight flan, nice toning, banker's marks, light marks, die wear and cracks, small edge cracks, weight 17.07 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $900.00 (€765.00)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS86430. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, gVF, the usual high relief and attractive archaic style, some die wear, bumps and scrapes, edge cracks, weight 16.865 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $760.00 (€646.00)


Trikka, Thessaly, Greece, c. 400 - 344 B.C.

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Trikka, modern Tikala, is located in the fertile plain of Thessaly in central Greece. Trikka was the birthplace of three of the Argonauts and also claimed to be the birthplace of Asklepios. Epidaurus also claimed to be the birthplace of Asklepios and that city was the site of his main temple in antiquity.
GB86191. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 788; SNG Cop 266; BMC Thessaly p. 52, 17; Liampi Trikka 7; Rogers 556; Moustaka 181, gVF, attractive style,, weight 7.245 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Thessaly, Trikka (Tikala, Greece) mint, c. 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of the Nymph Trikka right, wearing triple-drop pendant earring; reverse Asklepios seated right on a stool, bearded, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, transverse staff on far side leaning on left arm, feeding bird held in his right hand to snake coiled and rising up before him; rare; $380.00 (€323.00)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, 370 - 270 A.D.

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The site of ancient Argos Amphilochicum is near the modern town of Loutron on the Ambracian Gulf. According to varying traditions cited by Strabo, it was founded after the Trojan War by Alkmeion or his brother Amphilochos. No Mycenaean remains have been found, but Hekataios mentions the site at the end of the 6th century B.C. The rival of Ambrakia Arta in the 5th century B.C., it was allied with Athens at the beginning of the Peloponnesian War.
GB85882. Bronze chalkous, BCD Peloponnesos 1054; Nemea 1686 - 1714; BMC Peloponnesus p. 144, 101; HGC 5 707 (S), aVF, rough, obverse double struck, weight 1.640 g, maximum diameter 12.6 mm, die axis 0o, Argos mint, 370 - 270 A.D.; obverse wolf head left; reverse large A, facing crested Macedonian helmet below crossbar; ex J. Cohen Collection.; scarce; $85.00 (€72.25)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 280 - 260 B.C.

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Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GB85883. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1102; Nemea 1644 - 1646, BMC Peloponnesus p. 144, 106; SNG Cop 57; HGC 5 697 (S), VF, green patina, rough corrosion, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Argos mint, c. 280 - 260 B.C.; obverse head of Hera right, wearing polos inscribed APΓE; reverse Palladion statuette of Athena advancing left, helmeted and draped, shield on raised left arm, hurling javelin with right hand; ex J. Cohen Collection; scarce; $80.00 (€68.00)


Pheneos, Arkadia, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 300 - 240 B.C.

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Feneos lies at the foot of Mount Cyllene, mythical birthplace of the god Hermes. It therefore was an important cult center for the god, notably during the annual festival of the Hermaea. Catullus (Poem 68) mentions the seasonal flooding of the plain and says it was drained by an underground channel dug by Hercules during his Twelve Labors. According to Herodotus the river Styx originates near Feneos. In the Aeneid, Evander's fond memories of a visit by Aeneas' father Anchises to Feneos are one factor in his decision to ally his Arcadian colonists to the Trojans.
GB85884. Bronze chalkous, BCD Peloponnesos 1629; Imhoof-Blumer MG 257; Traité III 905 & pl. CCXXV, 13; HGC 5 995 (R2); SNG Cop -; BMC Peloponnesus -, F, dark olive green patina, reverse slightly off center, weight 2.693 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pheneos (Feneos, Greece) mint, c. 300 - 240 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis Heurippa right, quiver behind; reverse hound running right, ΦE above, syrinx (Pan pipes) below; ex J. Cohen Collection; very rare; $130.00 (€110.50)










REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Saturday, January 20, 2018.
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