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Ancient Coins of Greece
Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 320 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |356| |-| |320| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
When Larissa ceased minting the federal coins it shared with other Thessalian towns and adopted its own coinage in the late fifth century B.C., it chose local types for its coins. The obverse depicted the local fountain nymph Larissa, for whom the town was named, probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse depicted a horse in various poses.
GS95937. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly 1432; BCD Thessaly II 312; SNG Cop 121; BMC Thessaly p. 30, 60; HGC 4 454, VF, uneven toning, bumps and marks, areas of light etching, small edge crack, weight 5.751 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing pendant earring and necklace, hair is combed back behind ampyx; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg raised, preparing to lie down, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN above and below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $350.00 (€322.00)


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 85 - 50 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Argos,| |Argolis,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |85| |-| |50| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS95948. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos I (LHS 96) 1178, SNG Cop 42, BMC Peloponnesus p. 145, 114; HGC 5 692 (R1), VF, well centered, old cabinet toning, flow lines, some flatness of strike, tiny edge splits, weight 2.475 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Argos mint, magistrate Hieron, c. 85 - 50 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf left; reverse large A, I-E/P-Ω/NO-Σ in three lines across field, eagle standing right on line below, all in an incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $250.00 (€230.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 225 - 170 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |225| |-| |170| |B.C.||triobol|NEW
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95933. Silver triobol, Tsangari 507 (D13/R16); BCD Akarnania 472; SNG Cop III 14; BMC Thessaly p. 196, 26; HGC 4 950 (R1), aVF, attractive toning, scratches, tight flan, flan flaw rev. lower right, small edge split, weight 2.261 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 225o, Aitolian mint, c. 225 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above sloping downward parallel to boar's back, (ΠA monogram) below, ∆I and spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (€184.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |-| |160| |B.C.||triobol|NEW
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95934. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1243 (D109/R181), BCD Akarnania 491, HGC 4 952, BMC Thessaly p. 196, 24 var. (Πo monogram), SNG Cop III -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, scratches, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Aitolian mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, monogram in left field, ΠO below, spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $200.00 (€184.00)


Ambrakia, Epirus, Greece, c. 458 - 426 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Ambrakia,| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |c.| |458| |-| |426| |B.C.||stater|NEW
Ambracia (modern Arta) was founded as a Corinthian colony 650 - 625 B.C. Its economy was based on farmlands, fishing, timber for shipbuilding, and the exporting the produce of Epirus. In 433, Ambracia fought with Corinth at the Battle of Sybota, against the rebellious Corinthian colony of Corcyra (modern Corfu). Ambracia was besieged by Philip II and forced to accept a Macedonian garrison in 338. In 294, after 43 years of semi-autonomy, Ambracia was given by the son of Cassander to Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, who made it his capital, and adorned it with palace, temples and theaters. In the wars of Philip V of Macedon and the Epirotes against the Aetolian league (220-205) it changed sides and ultimately joined the Aetolians. Against Rome, it stood a stubborn siege, including the first known use of poison gas, against Roman siege tunnels. It was captured and plundered by Marcus Fulvius Nobilior in 189 B.C., after which it gradually fell into insignificance.Epirus and Environs
GS95936. Silver stater, Ravel Colts 22 (-/P12); Pegasi II p. 439, 8; HGC 3.1 197 (R2); BMC Corinth -; SNG Cop -, SNG Tubingen -, VF, toned, struck with worn dies, tight oval flan, weight 8.277 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Ambrakia (Arta, Greece) mint, c. 458 - 426 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying right, A below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet, no leather cap or neck guard, hair in long wavy locks over neck, all within incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $600.00 (€552.00)


Thessalian League, Thessaly, Greece, c. 170 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Thessalian| |League,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |B.C.||chalkous|
The object on the reverse was long considered somewhat mysterious. Roger identified it as a lyre. Robinson suggested a diadem or more probably a sling. Warren argued it is a stylized depiction of a dart sling, or Kestrosphendone, a weapon first introduced during the Third Macedonian War between Rome and Perseus of Macedon. Warren suggests this type was struck at Demetrias in Magnesia, under orders from Perseus, to commemorate the success of the weapon.
GB96459. Bronze chalkous, Warren, "Two Notes," NC 1961, pl. I, 11; BCD Thessaly II 24.2; HGC 4 236; Rogers 4 var., gVF, well centered, nice green patina, light earthen deposits, marks, weight 3.065 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, Magnesia, Demetrias (near Volos, Greece) mint, c. 170 B.C.; obverse Macedonian round shield, pellets and five double arcs/crescents around star in central boss; reverse kestrosphendone (dart sling) with dart inside, ΘEΣΣA/ΛΩN divided in two lines, the first above, ending below; ex David Wray Collection, ex John Jencek; very rare; $200.00 (€184.00)


Korkyra (Corfu), Island off Epirus, Greece, c. 433 - 360 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Korkyra| |(Corfu),| |Island| |off| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |c.| |433| |-| |360| |B.C.||stater|
Corfu is a picturesque island near the coasts of Albania and Greece. The advantageous trade position allowed Corcyra to play an important role in Greek history. After the Byzantine Empire gradually collapsed it was ruled by Venice from 1401 to 1797, during which time the Turks laid several sieges against its impregnable Byzantine castle.
GS95931. Silver stater, Fried Group III; BMC Thessaly p. 118, 64; SNG Munchen 634; Dewing 1453; HGC 6 35 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNG Tubingen -, Choice VF, well centered and struck, attractive old collection toning, scratches, obverse die wear, weight 10.871 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Korkyra (Corfu) mint, c. 433 - 375/60 B.C.; obverse cow left, head turned back toward suckling calf standing right below; reverse vertical double stellate pattern, divided by double line, within square double linear frame, K right, all within a circular linear border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $700.00 (€644.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Pellene, Peloponnesos, Greece

|Peloponnesos|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Pellene,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece||diassarion|
Pellene sided with Sparta in the Peloponnesian War, then joined the Achaean League until that League was dissolved by Alexander the Great. In the fourth century it was ruled for some time by a tyrant. In the third century, Pellene was garrisoned by the Aetolian League until the garrison was expelled by Aratus of Sicyon and the Achaeans in the 240s B.C. Pellene then joined the revived Achaean League until the League was incorporated into the Roman Empire in 146 B.C.
SH95334. Bronze diassarion, BCD Peloponnesos 607; BMC Peloponnesus p. 32, 15; Imhoof-Blumer NCP p. 92 (pl. S, XI); SNG Cop -, Dura -, aF, brown patina, legends obscure, weight 3.930 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Pellene mint, c. 198 - 205 A.D.; obverse L CEΠ CEV EPROC ΠE, laureate head right; reverse ΠEΛΛHNEΩN, Dionysus Lampter standing left, nude, pouring from kantharos in right hand, filleted thyrsus in left hand; ex J. S. Wagner Collection; very rare; $160.00 (€147.20)


Die Munzpragung von Pharsalos

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Munzpragung| |von| |Pharsalos|
The coins of Pharsalos, in southern Thessaly, in Greece. Saarbrücken Studies of archeology and ancient history, volume 14. Pharsalos was the only important Thessalian city issuing coins in the fifth century B.C. which was not part of the groups producing Thessalian federal coinage.
BK13159. Die Munzpragung von Pharsalos by Stella Lavva, 2001, in German, 283 pages, new; $70.00 (€64.40)










REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bishop, J.D. and R. Holloway. Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins. (New York, 1981).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen In Winterthur. (Winterthur, 1987).
Brett, A.B. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - )
Calciati, R. Pegasi. (Mortara, 1990).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922-1929).
Gardner, P. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. (London, 1883).
Grose, S.W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Volume II - The Greek| mainland, the Aegaean| islands, Crete|. (Cambridge, 1926).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Attica-Megaris-Aegina. (London, 1888).
Head, B. Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Central Greece (Lorcris, Phocis, Boeotia, and Euboea). (London, 1884).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Corinth, Colonies of Corinth, Etc. (London, 1889).
Hoover, O.D. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (Excluding Crete and Cyprus), 6th to 1st Centuries BC. (Lancaster, 2010).
Kraay, C.M. Archaic and Classical Greek Coins. (London, 1976).
Kroll, J.H. The Greek Coins. The Athenian Agora, vol. XXVI. (Princeton, 1993).
Lindgren, H.C. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Lindgren, H.C. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
Mildenberg, L. and S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques S. Pozzi. Auction 1. (4 Apr 1921, Geneva).
Price, M.J. and N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 12: Thessalien-Illyrien-Epirus-Korkyra. (Berlin, 2007).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 14: Attika, Megaris, Ägina. (Berlin, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 3: Akarnanien-Bithynien. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Vol. III, R.C. Lockett Collection. (London, 1938 - 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Vol. IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections: Part 4: Acarnania-Phliasia. (London, 1956).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 4: Paeonia-Thessaly. (London. 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 1, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macédoine-Thessalie-Illyrie-Epire-Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).
Thompson, M. The Agrinion Hoard. ANSNNM 159 (New York, 1968).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Crete and the Aegean Islands. (London, 1886).


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