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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |before 150 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic, before 150 B.C.

Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 30 B.C.

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This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii. BMC calls the figure on the right side of the obverse a statue. Ceka identifies it as a female. The figure can be identified as Harpokrates by the a hem-hem crown and right index finger up to the lips.
MA93699. Silver drachm, Ceka 325 corr., BMC Thessaly p. 71, 94, weight 2.313 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left; on right: Harpokrates standing facing wearing hemhem crown, finger to lips; reverse ∆YP − ΛY−KIΣ−KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; $16.00 (€14.08)


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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GA92834. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. G. Fallai, IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2e; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -; molded from bipod shell, VF, earthen encrustation, weight 17.464 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Aes Rude Fragments

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Aes rude is the earliest type of money used by the population of central Italy. They are just irregular pieces of bronze with no marks or designs. More advanced types of currency were used later: Aes Signatum and Aes Grave, and in the end, normal struck coins.
LT12228. Bronze Lot, Lot of 8 aes rude fragments, average weight c. 30g, $190.00 (€167.20)
 


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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GA90996. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. G. Fallai, IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2e; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -; molded from bipod shell, VF, weight 12.046 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Uncertain City (Panormos?), Sicily, Roman Rule, c. 211 - 190 B.C.

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In 254 B.C. Panormus was captured by the Romans. It retained its municipal freedom, and remained for many years one of the principal cities of Sicily. It continued to issue bronze coins, bearing the names of various resident magistrates, and following the Roman system. Under Augustus, Panormus received a Roman colony.
GI89312. Bronze triens, Semuncial standard; Calciati I p. 365, 205 (Panormos); SNG München 835 (Panormos); HGC 2 1691 (R1, uncertain Romano-Sicilian); SNG Cop -, aVF, off center but types on flan, a little rough, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain Romano-Sicilian mint, c. 211 - 190 B.C.; obverse veiled and draped bust of Demeter-Ceres left, small cornucopia behind neck; reverse double cornucopia, overflowing with bunches of grapes, tied with fillets, four pellets (mark of value) in a vertical line to left; rare; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Roman Republic, c. 211 - 150 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88440. Bronze as, Fair, weight 25.628 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 90o, c. 211 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right; $18.00 (€15.84)
 


Roman Republic, Fragment of an Aes Formatum Large Domed Disc Ingot, 4th Century B.C.

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AS86899. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7; fragment, weight 72.005 g, maximum diameter 37.1 mm, Italian mint, 4th century B.C.; very rare; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Roman Republic, Pre-Reform Struck Coinage, 217 - 215 B.C.

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In 218 B.C., Hannibal lead his army and three dozen elephants over the Alps into Italy. On 2 August 216 B.C., the Battle of Cannae ended in victory for Hannibal whose 40,000-man army defeated a Roman force of 70,000. More than 50,000 troops were killed, making this perhaps the deadliest one-day battle in all history. Although Hannibal surprised the Romans and beat them decisively on the battlefields of Italy, he lost his siege engines and most of his elephants to the cold temperatures and icy mountain paths. In the end he could defeat the Romans in the field again and again, but not take the strategically crucial city of Rome itself, leaving him unable to win the war. Hannibal continued to fight until 202 B.C., when Rome defeated him at the Battle of Zama.
RR88019. Bronze uncia, Crawford 38/6, Sydenham 86, BMCRR Rome 88, RBW Collection 98, SRCV I 615, aVF, dark brown patina, porous and pitted, weight 13.517 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 217 - 215 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in crested Attic helmet, pellet (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right, apotropaic eye and club on side of galley, ROMA above, pellet (mark of value) below; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Roman Republic, OPEI (Q. Opeimius?), 169 - 157 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88348. Copper as, Crawford 190/1, Sydenham 363, BMCRR Rome 598, RBW Collection 811, SRCV I 701, F, bumps and marks, obverse off center, small edge splits/cracks, weight 26.339 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, linear border; reverse galley prow right, OPEI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below, linear border; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Roman Republic, BAL Series, 169 - 158 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil. John Hyrcanus was the son of Simon the Maccabee and nephew of Judah Maccabee, the hero of the Hanukkah story. John Hyrcanus was the first Jewish ruler to issue coins in his own name.
RR88350. Bronze triens, Crawford 179/3, Sydenham 354b, BMCRR 614, RBW Collection 759, SRCV I 974, F, well centered, marks, porosity, some corrosion, edge crack, weight 13.464 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, central Italy mint, 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse head of Minerva right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, four pellets above; reverse prow of galley right, BAL (AL ligate) above, four pellets on right, ROMA below; scarce; $120.00 (€105.60)
 




  






REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979
Bertol, A. & K Farac. "Aes rude and aes formatum ? a new typology" in VAMZ, 3. s., XLV (2012).
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Crawford, M. "Paestum and Rome: The form and function of a subsidiary coinage" in La monetazione di bronzo do Poseidonia-Paestum. Annali 18-19 Supp. (Naples, 1971).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Berger, F. Die Münzen der Römischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
McCabe, A. "The Anonymous Struck Bronze Coinage of the Roman Republic: A Provisional Arrangement" in Essays Russo.
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N.ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. & I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).
Vecchi, I. Italian Cast Coinage. (London, 2013).

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 17, 2019.
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Roman Republic Coins before 150 B.C.