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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies||View Options:  |  |  | 

Helenistic Monarchies
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |XII| |Neos| |Dionysos,| |80| |-| |58| |B.C.| |and| |55| |-| |51| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.
GP96471. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1867 (Cleopatra VII); BMC Ptolemies p. 113, 39-40 (Ptolemaeus XI), Noeske 350, SNG Cop -, aVF, light toning, light deposits, light marks, tight flan, weight 9.155 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, 62 - 61 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, LK (year 20) left, ΠA right; $170.00 (€156.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos II Kallinikos, 246 - 226 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |II| |Kallinikos,| |246| |-| |226| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
The Seleukid Empire was under attack by Egypt when Kallinikos (beautiful victor) assumed the throne. He lost much of Thrace and coastal Anatolia to Ptolemy III. While he was fighting, his mother made his younger brother Antiochos Hierax joint ruler. Kallinikos agreed to partition the empire; however, Hierax wanted it all and Hierax and his Galatian mercenaries defeated him. Kallinikos managed to retain the lands east of the Tauros. The War of the Brothers weakened the empire, permitting regions such as Parthia to secede. Anatolia was soon lost. Kallinikos died after a fall from his horse.
GY96475. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 763.2b-c; Houghton CSE 966; Newell ESM 201, BMC Seleucid p. 16, 3; HGC 9 303jj (R1), SNG Spaer -, F, well centered on a tight flan, rough, right monogram obscure, weight 15.850 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, 244- 240 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse Apollo standing left, nude, examining arrow in right hand, leaning with left elbow on tall tripod lebes, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛ-EYKOY, monograms in inner left and outer right; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (10 Oct 2020), lot 2002 (part of); rare; $280.00 (€257.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
At the age of eighteen, Antiochus III inherited a disorganized state. Much of Anatolia had been lost and the easternmost provinces had revolted and broken away. After some initial defeats, Antiochus took Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt and then conquered Anatolia, earning him the epithet "the Great." In 192 B.C. Antiochus invaded Greece with a 10,000-man army, and was elected the commander in chief of the Aetolian League. In 191 B.C., however, the Romans routed him at Thermopylae, forcing him to withdraw to Anatolia. The Romans followed up by invading Anatolia and defeating him again. By the Treaty of Apamea 188 B.C., Antiochus abandoned all territory north and west of the Taurus, most of which the Roman Republic gave either to Rhodes or to the Attalid ruler Eumenes II, its allies. Many Greek cities were left free. As a consequence of this blow to the Seleucid power, the provinces which had recovered by Antiochus, reasserted their independence. Antiochus mounted a fresh eastern expedition. He died while pillaging a temple of Bel at Elymaïs, Persia, in 187 B.C.
GY96477. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1160.2, Newell ESM 231, HGC 9 440mm, SNG Spaer -, aVF, high relief portrait, flow lines, bumps and marks, weight 16.812 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 45o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, 220 - 204 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos III right, young idealized features, bangs over forehead, horn-like lock over ear, diadem ends waving in elaborate arabesques behind; reverse Apollo naked seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANT-IOXOY downward on left, monograms outer left, outer right, and in exergue; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (10 Oct 2020), lot 2002 (part of); $320.00 (€294.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
GY95961. Silver drachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber II 1785.1c; Newell SMA 186; BMC Seleucid p. 53, 21; HGC 9 887a, VF, toned, off center, die wear, light marks, weight 4.093 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 151 - 146 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, clean shave, diadem ends falling straight down; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY in two downward lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY in two downward lines on the left, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, examining arrow in right hand, left resting grounded on bow behind, Θ in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $170.00 (€156.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
SH95962. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1782.2c; BMC Seleucid p. 52, 11 var. (outer left monogram); SNG Spaer 1424 var. (same); Newell SMA 142 (same); HGC 9 875a, gVF, fine Hellenistic style, old cabinet toning, edge split, weak area at neck/date, old scratches, weight 16.327 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 149 - 148 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander Balas right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY in two downward lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY in two downward lines on the left, Zeus seated left on high back throne, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, Victory in extended right hand offering wreath, lotus topped scepter in left hand, Θ outer left, PA monogram inner left, date ∆ΞP (Seleucid Era year 164) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $500.00 (€460.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C., In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochus VII, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Cappadocian| |Kingdom|, |Cappadocian| |Kingdom,| |c.| |130| |-| |80| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |the| |Seleukid| |King,| |Antiochus| |VII,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.
GY95959. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2150.1, Houghton II 657, Newell SMA 296 SNG Spaer 1870, HGC 9 1069, VF, old cabinet toning, porosity, light scratches, weight 16.356 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia B mint, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse Athena standing left, Nike extended in right hand, spear and shield in left hand, Nike standing left extending wreath, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines on the right, EYEPΓETOY on the left, ligate ∆I over Λ outer left, T inner left, A inner right, laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $200.00 (€184.00)


Heritage Auctions, The Shoshana Collection of Ancient Judaean Coins Part I and Part II, 2012

|Auction| |Catalogs|, |Heritage| |Auctions,| |The| |Shoshana| |Collection| |of| |Ancient| |Judaean| |Coins| |Part| |I| |and| |Part| |II,| |2012|NEW
2 Auctions held 8-9 March 2012 in New York and 5 Sept. 2012 in Longbeach, CA. The Shoshana Collection, assembled over the course of four decades by a diligent collector of Judean coins featuring one of only two known Year 1 silver shekel prototypes and a Year 5 silver shekel found at the Jewish holy site of Masada is the greatest assembly of ancient coins related to the foundation of ancient Israel ever offered, with more than 2,300 coins spanning more than 11 centuries.
BC23427. Heritage World & Ancient Coin Auctions, The Shoshana Collection of Ancient Judaean Coins Part I and Part II 2012, softcover, cover wear, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $45.00 (€41.40)


Heritage Auctions, The Shoshana Collection of Ancient Judaean Coins, Part I, 8-9 March 2012

|Auction| |Catalogs|, |Heritage| |Auctions,| |The| |Shoshana| |Collection| |of| |Ancient| |Judaean| |Coins,| |Part| |I,| |8-9| |March| |2012|NEW
Auction held 8-9 March 2012 in New York, Part 1 of the collection sale. The Shoshana Collection, assembled over the course of four decades by a diligent collector of Judean coins featuring one of only two known Year 1 silver shekel prototypes and a Year 5 silver shekel found at the Jewish holy site of Masada is the greatest assembly of ancient coins related to the foundation of ancient Israel ever offered, with more than 2,300 coins spanning more than 11 centuries.
BC23440. Heritage Auctions, The Shoshana Collection of Ancient Judaean Coins, Part I, 8-9 March 2012, softcover, cover wear, 180 pages, 712 lots, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $20.00 (€18.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY95954. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463.3h, Newell SMA 448, SNG Spaer 2807, HGC 9 1319, gVF, toning, porosity, light corrosion, weight 14.971 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike in right hand crowning him with wreath, long scepter in left hand, Φ/A left outer left, ΛI monogram under throne, Π in exergue, laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $250.00 (€230.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
SH95955. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463.2e, Newell SMA 440, SNG Spaer 2801, HGC 9 1319, Choice gVF, old cabinet toning, light scratches, weight 16.117 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike in right hand crowning him with wreath, long scepter in left hand, Φ/A left, Θ inner left, laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€276.00)











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