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Helenistic Monarchies

Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Hebryzelmis, c. 389 - 383 B.C.

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Hebryzelmis was a king of the Odrysian kingdom of Thrace, c. 389 - 383 B.C. Hebrizelm Hill on Greenwich Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is named for Hebryzelmis. Based on several other examples with the same countermark placement, the countermarks were carefully placed to fit well with the design. In addition, a similar punch is found on at least one other examples, also near the nose.
GB89989. Bronze AE 17, Topalov p. 239, 86 (same countermarks, same placement), F, green patina with red areas, some corrosion, punch on nose, weight 4.974 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, c. 389 - 383 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Cybele right, countermark: PH monogram in rectangular incuse (on neck); reverse Two-handled cup with a round body and conical mouth, EB-PY divided across field, grain ear right below, countermark: gorgoneion in round incuse (on vessel side); very rare; $180.00 (€158.40)


Pergamene Kingdom, 282 - 263 B.C.

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Philetaerus deserted Lysimachus in 282 B.C., taking control of Pergamon and a large treasure deposited there. At first nominally a Seleukid suzerainty, Pergamon grew into a strong, prosperous and independent kingdom. These bronze coins were struck in the name of the founder throughout all succeeding reigns.
GB89993. Bronze AE 13, SNG BnF 1682 ff.; SNG Tübingen 2370 ff.; SNG Cop 349; BMC Mysia p. 119, 58 ff., VF, dark patina with some copper on high points, light marks, light porosity, weight 1.812 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 282 - 263 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Macedonian helmet; reverse strung bow, ΦIΛE/TAIPOY divided in two lines above and below, countermark: anchor; $50.00 (€44.00)


Koinon of Macedonia, Portrait of Alexander the Great, c. 238 - 244 A.D.

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The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year.

The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.


RP89876. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 757; BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunter -, SNG Saroglos -, Lindgren -, Choice F, well centered, green patina, slightly rough, central depressions, weight 14.615 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, time of Gordian III, c. 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POC, head of Alexander the Great right, wearing lion scalp headdress (as Herakles); reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN•B•N•, two agonistic urns each containing palm on a table with lion's feet; scarce; $80.00 (€70.40)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy IX Soter II (Lathyros), 2nd Reign, 88 - 80 B.C.

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Ptolemy IX Soter II Lathyros was the elder son of Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. After his father died in 116 B.C., he ruled jointly with his mother Cleopatra III. His first reign ended in 110 B.C. when his mother replaced him with her favorite son, Alexander, who ruled as Ptolemy X. In 109 B.C., Ptolemy IX Soter successfully recovered the throne. In 107 B.C., however, his mother claimed that he had tried to kill her and Ptolemy X Alexander was again made king. Ptolemy IX ruled Cyprus. Ptolemy X Alexander had their mother, Cleopatra III, murdered in 101 B.C. Ptolemy IX Soter II Lathyros became king of Egypt again in 88 B.C., after Ptolemy X Alexander was killed in battle, until his death in 81 B.C.
GP88180. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1687 & pl. 57, 31 (6 spec.); SNG Cop 375; BMC Ptolemies p. 114, 79 & pl. xxviii, 8; Cohen DCA 64; Noeske -; Hosking -, SNG Milan -, gVF, toned, flow lines, full legend, high points of hair not fully struck, weight 13.793 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 88 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, LKΘ (year 29) left, ΠA right; from a New England collector; very rare; $400.00 (€352.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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The First Syrian War broke out in 276, when Ptolemy II invaded Syria, seizing Damascus. Antiochus defeated the invasion and in 274 married his daughter to Ptolemy’s half brother Magas, governor of Cyrenaica. Supported by Antiochus, Magas declared himself independent and invaded Egypt. Aided by a mutiny of Ptolemy’s Gallic mercenaries he nearly reached Alexandria. Magas was forced to retreat when, encouraged by Arisnoe, Libya invaded Cyrenaica. In 274, Ptolemy went on the offensive and captured much of the Cilician coast. Antiochus was forced to admit defeat. Egypt gained western Cilicia, southern Lycia, Caunus, Halicarnassus, Myndus, Cnidus, probably Miletus, all of Phoenicia (including Tyre), and the Marsyas valley in Syria, but not Damascus.
GP89316. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B322, Svoronos 635 (1 spec.), SNG Cop 479, Cox Curium 75, aF, dark patina, weight 4.251 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, Tyre mint, c. 274 - 271 B.C.; obverse diademed, horned head of deified Alexander the Great right, long flowing hair; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings slightly open, Z over vertical club handle up in left field; from a New England collector; rare; $50.00 (€44.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cyprus, c. Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.

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GP89345. Bronze AE 31, Malter 275; cf. SNG Milan 519 (similar without palm); SNG Cop 674 (same), BMC Ptolemies -, Svoronos -, Paphos II -, RPC -, Noeske -;, aVF, uneven strike, earthen encrustation, scratches, areas of corrosion, beveled obverse edge, weight 11.502 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, uncertain mint, c. late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), two eagles standing left on a thunderbolt, heads left, wings closed, palm branch before; from a New England collector; extremely rare; $180.00 (€158.40)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy X Alexander, 106 - 88 B.C.

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An older portrait quite similar to that Ptolemy I, ancestor of Ptolemy X Alexander on most family branches. There is quite a bit of variation in portraits during this period. The small pellets below the B and above the date may be intentional control marks.
GP91535. Bronze tetradrachm, Svoronos 1674, SNG Cop 363, Cohen DCA 68, BMC Ptolemies -, SNG Milan -, Weiser -, Noeske -, Hosking -, gVF, attractive old cabinet toning, tight flan, obverse die wear, weight 13.875 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, 101 - 100 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LI∆ (year 14) left, ΠA right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $500.00 (€440.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Huge 71.416 g, 46.8 mm bronze! The largest of all Ptolemaic bronze coin types.
GP92402. Bronze octobol, Lorber CPE B365; Svoronos 446; Weiser 19; BMC Ptolemies p. 37, 158; SNG Cop 142; Noeske 64; Hosking 13; Malter 67, gVF, well centered on a broad flan, partial red encrustation/patina, light double strike on reverse, central depressions, beveled obverse edge, weight 71.416 g, maximum diameter 46.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 285 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head turned back right, E between legs; from a New England Collector; scarce; $700.00 (€616.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Ptolemy II encouraged education, commerce, industry, immigration and trade resulting in a prosperous growing economy and making him the richest monarch of his age. His 112 ships comprised the most powerful fleet that had ever existed. His splendid court compares with the Versailles of Louis XIV. An enthusiast for Hellenic culture, he also adopted Egyptian religious concepts bolstering his image as a pharaoh. At the Library at Alexandria, Jewish texts were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible. He defeated the Seleucids in the first Syrian War, gaining control of western Cilicia, southern Lycia, Caunus, Halicarnassus, Myndus, Cnidus, probably Miletus, all of Phoenicia, and even part of Syria.
GP93009. Bronze diobol, Lorber CPE 174; Svoronos 576 (23 spec.); Weiser 10; Noeske 60; BMC Ptolemies p. 25, 15; SNG Milan 61; Weber 8248, Cox Curium 62; SNG Blackburn 1160, aVF, well centered, black patina, spots of corrosion, some patina chipping, weight 14.323 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 274 - 261 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle with open wings standing left on thunderbolt, ΣΩ monogram over shield in left field, o between eagle's legs; from Jimi Berlin; $100.00 (€88.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 or 204 - 180 B.C.

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The name of Ptolemy V Epiphanes appears on the Rosetta stone. He married Cleopatra I, the daughter of the Seleukid king Antiochos III, and was the father of Ptolemy VI, VII, and Cleopatra II. Ptolemy V lost Judea, Philistia, and Phoenicia to Antiochos III after the battle of Panium in 198 B.C. (Dan 11:13-16).
GP93399. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1235; Weiser 131; SNG Cop 248; BMC Ptolemies p. 94, 72; Malter 185; Macdonald Hunter III p. 384, 7; Weber p. 857, 8274; McClean p. 431, 9830, VF, scratches, tiny edge central depressions, obverse edge beveled, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 197 - 183 B.C.; obverse head of Isis right, hair in long curls, wreathed in grain; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings open; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€70.40)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 15, 2019.
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Helenistic