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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria| ▸ |Antioch||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Antioch, Syria
Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |19|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity,” for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Antioch was renamed Theoupolis after it was nearly destroyed by an earthquake on 29 November 528. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east. 6th Century Antioch
RY92567. Bronze AE 19, McAlee 782(a); Butcher 470; SNG Cop 243 var. (star vice diamond); BMC Galatia p. 203, 433 var. (same), F, black patina with highlighting natural red earthen deposits, tight flan, porosity, weight 4.869 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT KAI MAP AVP ANTΩNEINOC CE (or similar), laureate head right; reverse ∆ E (∆ EΠAPXEIΩN - "of the four eparchies") above, large S•C (senatus consulto), eagle with spread wings and head right below, all within laurel wreath closed at the top with a diamond (containing pellet?); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY92562. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1045a (scarce); Prieur 466; BMC Galatia p. 218, 559; SNG Cop -, aVF, dark patina, porosity, scratches reverse right field, small flaw on neck, weight 11.581 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆ (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time), eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA over S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $110.00 (€101.20) ON RESERVE


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|NEW
Struck at Antioch during the period Saint Paul visited Antioch on his missionary journeys. It was at Antioch that believers in Jesus Christ were first called Christians.
RY92565. Bronze as, McAlee 245(e); SNG Righetti 1920; Butcher 92i; SNG Cop 151; RPC I 4277 (includes dot control variants); BMC Galatia p. 171, 166 var. (obv. legend), VF, nice portrait, uneven toning on obv., a bit rough with mild etching and pitting, weight 14.783 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 41 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse IMP TI CLAVD CAE AVG GER (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head right; reverse large S C (senatus consulto), within inner circle, surrounded by laurel wreath tied at the bottom with eight bunches of leaves, no dot (control); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 (€119.60) ON RESERVE


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |29|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY92560. Bronze AE 29, McAlee 410(i) (rare), SNG Cop 180, RPC II 2024 (18 spec. with a variety of controls), BMC Galatia p. 181, 245 var. (E), F, dark green patina, well centered, light marks and scratches, light earthen deposits, obverse edge beveled, weight 12.202 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 81 - 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITI-ANVS CAES AVG, laureate head left; reverse large S C, Θ below (control number, Greek 9), within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|NEW
The size of the flan varies greatly for this issue, from 21 to 29mm, averaging c. 24 mm.
RY92563. Bronze as, McAlee 555(a); BMC Galatia p. 189, 306; SNG Righetti 1956; SNG Cop 213 var. (Γ), gF, centered on a tight flan cutting off much of legend, dark desert patina, scratches, porosity, small edge splits, weight 12.357 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. Aug 138 - 145 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TIT AIΛ A∆PIA ANT∆NEINOC CEBA EV (or similar), laureate head right; reverse large S•C (senatus consulto), A below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 (€82.80)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Syria, Antioch

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Syria,| |Antioch||tetradrachm|NEW
When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Later legend elaborates, stating that Babylas demanded that he do penance for his part in the murder of the young Gordian III before he would allow Philip to celebrate Easter. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RY92568. Bronze tetradrachm, McAlee 1017 (scarce), Prieur 394, RPC Online VIII U29022 (21 spec.), SNG Cop 276, Dura 453, BMC Galatia -, VF, porous, rough areas, weight 12.191 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, series 4, 1st half of 247 A.D.; obverse MAP IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOI KECAP, bare headed, draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing facing, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA over S C in in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 280, Julius Saturninus, the governor of Syria, was made emperor by his troops. Probus besiege him at Apamea, where he was captured and executed.
RL94802. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 921, SRCV III 11960, Cohen VI 87, Hunter IV 341, Pink VI-1 p. 40, 2, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, closed flan crack, light marks, weight 3.192 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 280 - 281 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), emperor standing right, holding eagle tipped scepter in left hand, receiving globe from Jupiter with right hand, E lower in center, XXI in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $70.00 (€64.40)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
SH95962. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1782.2c; BMC Seleucid p. 52, 11 var. (outer left monogram); SNG Spaer 1424 var. (same); Newell SMA 142 (same); HGC 9 875a, gVF, fine Hellenistic style, old cabinet toning, edge split, weak area at neck/date, old scratches, weight 16.327 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 149 - 148 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander Balas right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY in two downward lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY in two downward lines on the left, Zeus seated left on high back throne, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, Victory in extended right hand offering wreath, lotus topped scepter in left hand, Θ outer left, PA monogram inner left, date ∆ΞP (Seleucid Era year 164) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $500.00 (€460.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||AE| |20|
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GB95287. Bronze serrated AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 1645; Houghton CSE 170; SNG Spaer 1295 ff.; BMC Seleucid p. 80, 3 - 4; Babelon 727 ff.; HGC 9 826 (S), F, well centered, porous, small central cavities, weight 7.680 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 162 - 150 B.C.; obverse bust of Artemis right wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse bow and quiver with strap, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ∆HMHTPIOY downward on left, no control symbols; $65.00 (€59.80)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||semis|
In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafés than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
RY93576. Bronze semis, RPC Online IV.3 T7149, McAlee 610, VF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obverse a little off center, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 169 A.D.; obverse AVT K Λ AVPHΛ OVHPOC CEB, radiate head right; reverse S•C, uncertain Greek numeral-letter below, all within wreath; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 483; $90.00 (€82.80)
 




  






REFERENCES|

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