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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Kibyra, Phrygia

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Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Gölhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP89888. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2882 (5 spec. online); SNG Fitzwilliam 4954 (same dies); SNGvA 3727; Imhoof GM p. 397, 88; Waddington 5819; SNG Cop -; BMC Phrygia -, aVF, green patina, most of ethnic off flan, small edge splits, weight 4.425 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 270o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, obverse bare head right; reverse capricorn right, head turned back left, CEBATOC above, KIBYPATWN counterclockwise below and upward on right; rare; $150.00 (€132.00)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
CM89990. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 96 (same countermarks); cf. BMC Troas p. 12, 29 ff.; SNG München 92 f.; SNGvA 1461, F, scattered porosity, edge crack, clear countermarks, weight 3.948 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing; c/m: lyre; reverse lyre, AΛEΞAN (or similar) around), all within laurel wreath; c/m: star of six rays around a central pellet within a 7.5mm round punch; $120.00 (€105.60)


Pergamene Kingdom, 282 - 263 B.C.

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Philetaerus deserted Lysimachus in 282 B.C., taking control of Pergamon and a large treasure deposited there. At first nominally a Seleukid suzerainty, Pergamon grew into a strong, prosperous and independent kingdom. These bronze coins were struck in the name of the founder throughout all succeeding reigns.
GB89993. Bronze AE 13, SNG BnF 1682 ff.; SNG Tübingen 2370 ff.; SNG Cop 349; BMC Mysia p. 119, 58 ff., VF, dark patina with some copper on high points, light marks, light porosity, weight 1.812 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 282 - 263 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Macedonian helmet; reverse strung bow, ΦIΛE/TAIPOY divided in two lines above and below, countermark: anchor; $50.00 (€44.00)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century AD.
GB86928. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, dark blue-green patina, die wear, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $60.00 (€52.80)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century AD.
GB86930. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, mottled patina, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 2.159 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $50.00 (€44.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 BC

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According to Ptolemaic bronze expert Daniel Wolf, "These coins are attributed by Svoronos to Ake-Ptolemaïs (Acre), but modern finds indicate they are most likely from the area near (modern) Bodrum in Turkey." Cathy Lorber has since refined the attribution of these tripod types to Telmessus in Lydia, modern Fethiye. There have been more finds there than at Bodrum.
GP93400. Bronze dichalkon, Lorber CPE B437, Svoronos 793 (7 spec.), Weiser 80, BMC Ptolemies -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, Noeske -, Malter -, Hosking -, gVF, brown tone, broad flan, weight 3.838 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Telmessus (Fethiye, Turkey) mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing half left atop fulmen, head left, wings closed, tripod in left field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€70.40)


Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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Located near Lampsacus, Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it was in the domain of Lysimachus and then the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia within the province of Asia. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus.
RP92066. Bronze AE 21, Apparently unpublished in standard references, SNG Righetti 743 var. (obv. legend), BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Hunt -, F, well centered, bumps an scratches, weight 3.806 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, Early 256 - 258 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS NOBIL CAES, laureate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right; reverse Capricorn swimming right, cornucopia on back, holding celestial globe between legs, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; ex John Jencek; extremely rare, unpublished in standard references, two specimens known to Forum (from auctions); $140.00 (€123.20)


Sigeion, Troas, c. 355 - 334 B.C.

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Sigeion was an ancient Greek city in the north-west of the Troad region of Anatolia located at the mouth of the Scamander (the modern Karamenderes River). The name 'Sigeion' means "silent place." In Classical Antiquity, the name was assumed to be antiphrastic, i.e. indicating a characteristic of the place contrary to reality, since the seas in this region are known for their fierce storms.
GB92159. Bronze AE 19, BMC Troas p. 86, 2 ff.; SNG München 308; SNG Cop 495; SNGvA 7638, VF, dark green patina, earthen encrustations, some light corrosion, obverse edge beveled, weight 6.075 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sigeion (Kumkale, Turkey) mint, c. 355 - 334 B.C.; obverse head of Athena facing, turned slightly right, wearing triple-crested helmet; reverse owl standing to right, head facing, crescent with horns right left, ΣIΓE downward on right; ex Gerhard Rohde Ancient Coins; $130.00 (€114.40)


Antiocheia ad Kydnum (Tarsos), Cilicia, c. 175 - 164 B.C.

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Tarsos was renamed Antiocheia ad Kydnum under Antiochos IV Epiphanes, and reverted to Tarsus c. 164 B.C.
GB92170. Bronze AE 20, cf. SNG Levante 916, SNG BnF 1279 ff., SNG Cop 325 (different monograms), VF, well centered on a tight flan, dark patina with light buff earthen highlighting, light bumps, scratches and porosity, weight 9.600 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antiocheia ad Kydnum (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 175 - 164 B.C.; obverse club within oak wreath; reverse ANTIOXEΩN TΩN ΠPOΣ TΩI KY∆NΩI (almost entirely off flan), cornucopia flanked by four monograms; ex Neptune Numismatics; scarce; $100.00 (€88.00)


Antiochia, Pisidia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Antiochia in Pisidia, also know as Antiochia in Phrygia, and under the Roman Empire as Antiochia Caesareia or Antiochia Colonia Caesarea, was on the border of Pisidia and Phrygia, at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions. After the death of Alexander the Great, Seleucus I Nicator, founder of the Seleucid Dynasty, took control of Pisidia. Captured places were Hellenised and, in order to protect the population, nearly 60 fortified cities were founded at strategically important places, usually on an acropolis. Seleucus gave 16 of them the name of his father Antiochos. Colonists were brought from Magnesia on the Maeander to found Antiochia in Pisidia.
GB92188. Bronze tetrassarion, Imhoof KM p. 108, 5; SNG Cop 12 var. (magistrate); SNGvA 4914 var. (same, ethnic around), VF, green patina with earthen highlighting, weight 6.268 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antiochia in Pisidia (near Yalvaç, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse eagle standing slight right on thunderbolt, wings open, crescent above, Γ (mark of value) lower right; reverse star of six rays around central pellet, ANTIO/ΞE-ΩN in two lines, ΘEAPI∆O (magistrate's name) below; ex Gerhard Rohde Ancient Coins; extremely rare; $180.00 (€158.40)











Catalog current as of Monday, October 21, 2019.
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Anatolia