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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!

Rhodes, Caria, c. 1 B.C. - 60 A.D.

|Rhodos|, |Rhodes,| |Caria,| |c.| |1| |B.C.| |-| |60| |A.D.||drachm|NEW
After surrendering its independence to Rome, Rhodes became a cultural and educational center for Roman noble families and was especially noted for its teachers of rhetoric, such as Hermagoras and the unknown author of Rhetorica ad Herennium. At first, the state was an important ally of Rome and enjoyed numerous privileges, but these were later lost in various machinations of Roman politics. Cassius eventually invaded the island and sacked the city. In the early Imperial period Rhodes became a favorite place for political exiles. Early in the 1st century A.D., the Tiberius spent a brief term of exile on Rhodes. Saint Paul brought Christianity to people on the island. Rhodes reached her zenith in the 3rd century.
GB97281. Bronze drachm, RPC I 2767 (same obv. die); SNG Munchen 685 (same obv. die); SNG Cop 890; SNG Righetti 1001; BMC Caria p. 265, 381; Lindgren 702; SNGvA -; HGC 6 -, F, obverse corrosion, weight 23.345 g, maximum diameter 36.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 1 - 60 A.D.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy; reverse Nike standing left on prow, extending right hand, palm frond in left hand, PO∆I/ΩN in two lines on left over rose in lower left field, EΠI / XAPEI/NOY (struck under [magistrate] Chapeinos) in right field; big 36mm bronze; $150.00 (€138.00)


Karia, 5th Century B.C.

|Other| |Caria|, |Karia,| |5th| |Century| |B.C.||trihemitartemorion|NEW
The 5th century is traditionally recognized as the classical period of the Greeks, which would continue all the way through the 4th century until the time of Alexander the Great. The life of Socrates represented a major milestone in Greek philosophy though his teachings only survive through the work of his students, most notably Plato and Xenophon. The tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, as well as the comedian Aristophanes all date from this era and many of their works are still considered classics of the western theatrical canon.
GA97597. Silver trihemitartemorion, Konuk Kasolaba 15, SNG Kayhan 988, SNG Keckman 906, SNG Tübingen 3322, Troxell Carians 10, aVF, dark toning, weight 0.210 g, maximum diameter 5.5 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Carian mint, 5th Century B.C.; obverse ram head right; reverse roaring lion forepart right, with foreleg below, within incuse square; $100.00 (€92.00)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |20|NEW
Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13-52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP97495. Bronze AE 20, SNG BnF 1323 (same obv. die), Krzyzanowska -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lycia -, VF, brown tone with brassy high points, well centered but tight flan cuts of parts of the obverse legend, weight 3.348 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, Aug 253 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse IMP CA GALLIHNVS PIVS R, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANTI-OCHI CL, vexillum topped with eagle, flanked by two legionary standards, · S R (Senatus Romanum) in exergue; $80.00 (€73.60)


Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia, c. 350 - 190 B.C.

|Magnesia| |ad| |Meandrum|, |Magnesia| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Ionia,| |c.| |350| |-| |190| |B.C.||hemidrachm|NEW
Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
GS96001. Silver hemidrachm, cf. SNG Cop 819; BMC Ionia p. 159, 8 - 13 (various magistrates), Fair, dark cabinet tone, small flan, weight 1.255 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 190 B.C.; obverse Cavalryman on horseback prancing right, wearing helmet, cuirass, and chlamys flying behind, holding couched spear in right hand, reins in left hand; reverse humped bull butting left, MAΓN above, stalk of grain right, maeander pattern below, magistrate's name (obscure) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 (€46.00)


Kyme, Aeolis, 165 - 140 B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aeolis,| |165| |-| |140| |B.C.||stephanophoric| |tetradrachm|NEW
In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a nation of all-female warriors Herodotus placed them in a region bordering Scythia in Sarmatia (modern territory of Ukraine). Other historiographers place them in Asia Minor or Libya.
SH96005. Silver stephanophoric tetradrachm, SNGvA 1636; SNG Cop 103; BMC Troas p. 111, 73; Weber 5502, VF, attractive style, centered on a broad flan, toned, porous slightly rough surfaces, weight 16.286 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 165 - 140 B.C.; obverse head of Amazon Kyme right, wearing taenia; reverse horse walking right, oinochoe below raised left foreleg, KYMAIΩN downward on right, KAΛΛIAΣ (magistrate) in exergue, all in laurel wreath tied at the bottom; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $900.00 (€828.00)


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 187 - 186 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |187| |-| |186| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own envoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4,000 horses annually.

At the time this coin was struck, the territory of Aspendos was surrounded by the Attalid's Pergamene Kingdom but retained independence.
GS95975. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2907, Cohen DCA 312/26, Müller Alexander -, aVF, light toning, light scratches, weight 16.555 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 187 - 186 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, AΣ over K[ (year 26 Era of Aspendos) lower left, spear head left (control mark) in exergue, Seleukid countermark on right: anchor in a rectangular punch; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $200.00 (€184.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Philip

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Philip||drachm|
Struck after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Colophon also struck nearly identical drachms during this period in the name of Alexander IV.
GS95977. Silver drachm, Price P88, Müller Alexander P34, ADM I 245, aVF, dark old collection toning, light marks, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left on throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right, TI over star left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 (€138.00)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86922. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, blue green patina, struck with a slightly damaged obverse die, reverse off center, earthen deposits, weight 2.570 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 180o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $60.00 (€55.20)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86923. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, F, mottled patina, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 2.738 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $50.00 (€46.00)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86924. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, gF, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.363 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $80.00 (€73.60)











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