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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!

Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

|Paphlagonia|, |Sinope,| |Paphlagonia,| |c.| |330| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rm in 1214.
SH95239. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1481, SNG Cop 277, Rec Gen 25, HGC 7 399, SNGvA 6847, gVF, attractive style, toned, well centered, tight flan as usual for the type, some light scratches, weight 5.969 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 15o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, magistrate Agreos, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Sinope left, hair in sakkos, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace, apluster before her; reverse eagle flying right with dolphin right in talons, AΓPEΩΣ (magistrate's name) below wing, ΣINΩ below dolphin; ex Forum (2015); $680.00 SALE |PRICE| $612.00


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 202 - 189 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |202| |-| |189| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Coins with these obverse and reverse types were struck by numerous magistrates, c. 202 - 133 B.C. Kinns identified two different issues by magistrates named Mitras. This type with the rectangular wings was struck by the earlier Mitras and, according to Kinns, an example of this earlier type was found in a hoard (CH II.81, Syria, 1971) believed to have been deposited in 189 B.C.
GS95246. Silver drachm, struck on the Attic standard; Kinns Ephesus p. 88; Head Ephesus p. 58; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -; BMC Ionia -, gVF, well centered, toned, die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, magistrate Metras (I), c. 202 - 189 B.C.; obverse bee seen from above, straight rectangular wings, E-Φ flanking above wings; reverse stag standing right on exergual line, palm tree in background center on far side of stag, MHTPAΣ (magistrate) downward on right; ex Forum (2017), ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $440.00 SALE |PRICE| $396.00


Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 150 - 125 B.C.

|Rhodos|, |Rhodos,| |Carian| |Islands,| |c.| |150| |-| |125| |B.C.|, |drachm|
This magistrate, Euanor, is listed in Leschhorn's Lexikon, but this type is missing from all the primary references and collections.
SH95248. Silver drachm, Leschhorn Lexikon p. 498; Jenkins Rhodian, group A, -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mnchen -; SNG Tb -; HGC 6 -, gVF, bold high relief, well centered, toned, light marks, weight 3.171 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, magistrate Euanor, c. 150 - 125 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse rose with bud to right, EYANΩP ( magistrate's name) above, P-O divided across field, kerykeion (caduceus) lower left, all within incuse square; ex Forum (2017); very rare; $370.00 SALE |PRICE| $333.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |diobol|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GA95210. Silver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, group A, type I, pl. V, 8; AMNG III 14; SNGvA 7390; SNG BnF 1126; SNG Ashmolean 653; SNG Cop 184; Rosen 524; SGCV II 3879, EF, well centered, dark toning, a few light marks, reverse die damaged, weight 1.230 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse janiform female heads, each wearing stephanos, with central earring; reverse head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, within incuse square; ex Forum (2018); $290.00 SALE |PRICE| $261.00


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |450| |-| |400| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
During the Peloponnesian War, 431 - 404 B.C., Cyzicus was subject alternately to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GA95216. Silver hemiobol, von Fritze III 14; SNG Kayhan 57; SNG BnF 375; SNG Cop 49; BMC Mysia p. 35, 120; SNGvA -, EF, well struck and centered on a crowded flan, toned, weight 0.386 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, star of four rays above, all in incuse square; ex Forum (2015); $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Mazaios,| |Satrap| |of| |Cilicia,| |361| |-| |334| |B.C.,| |Tarsos,| |Cilicia|, |stater|
Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 B.C. and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 B.C., Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
GS95221. Silver stater, SNG Levante supp. 20, Casabonne 2D, SNG BnF 335 var. (TN vice NT), SNG Cop 311 var. (same and monogram on rev.), SNG Delepierre 2880 var. (same), VF, obverse slightly off center, die wear, some porosity, weight 10.261 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361/360 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (Baaltars) in Aramaic (read upward) behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs; bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand; lotus headed scepter vertical behind in left hand; Aramaic NT lower left, Aramaic M below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above; ex Forum, ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $540.00


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 412 - 378 B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Mytilene,| |Lesbos,| |c.| |412| |-| |378| |B.C.|, |hekte|
Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH95224. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 79, SNGvA 1731, BMC Troas 62; Pozzi 2324, Trait II 2183, HGC 6 1005, VF, fine style, toned, scuff on cheek, marks, weight 2.551 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 180o, Mytilene mint, c. 412 - 378 B.C.; obverse female (muse?) head right, hair in sakkos, wearing a pendant earring and necklace; reverse Kithara with seven strings in linear square, within incuse square; ex Forum (2016), ex Frank L. Kovacs; $930.00 (837.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Mytilene,| |Lesbos,| |c.| |377| |-| |326| |B.C.|, |hekte|
Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH95232. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 100B (k/ξ); SNG Cop 317; SNGvA 1715; Boston MFA 1718, HGC 6 1026, aEF, fine style, well centered and struck, flow lines, light deposits, weight 2.542 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, coiled snake lower left; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, all within linear frame and incuse square; ex Forum (2018), ex Roma Numismatics, auction XV (5 Apr 2018), lot 196; $1000.00 SALE |PRICE| $910.00


Persian Achaemenid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Pixodaros, c. 340 - 335 B.C.

|Persian| |Caria|, |Persian| |Achaemenid| |Empire,| |Carian| |Satrapy,| |Pixodaros,| |c.| |340| |-| |335| |B.C.|, |didrachm|
Pixodarus was the youngest of the three sons of Hecatomnus, all of whom successively ruled. To secure the friendship of Philip II, king of Macedonia, Pixodarus offered his eldest daughter in marriage to his Philip's son Arrhidaeus. Arrhidaeus' ambitious younger brother, Alexander (later Alexander the Great) offered himself instead. Pixodarus eagerly agreed but Philip put an end to the scheme. Pixodarus died, apparently a natural death, before Alexander landed in Asia in 334 B.C. and was succeeded by his Persian son-in-law Orontobates.
SH95234. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 2375; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Kayhan 891; SNG Lockett 2913; BMC Caria p. 185, 5 ff.; Weber 6608; SGCV II 4966, Nice VF, toned, attractive style, bold strike, weight 6.270 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Halikarnassos (Bodrum, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 335 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse Zeus Labraundos standing right, labrys (double-headed axe) over shoulder in right, lotus-tipped scepter vertical in left, ΠIΞΩ∆APOY downward on right; ex Forum (2012); $950.00 SALE |PRICE| $855.00


Parion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Parium|, |Parion,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
BMC assigns the ethnic bearing side as the coin reverse. SNG Copenhagen and other references list this Parion issue with the bull side as the obverse and the Gorgoneion side as the reverse. The latter is correct since on many of the coins the Gorgoneion was clearly struck with the mobile hammer die, same as this coin.
GS95235. Silver hemidrachm, SNG BnF 1385; SNGvA 7424; BMC Mysia p. 96, 31; SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, porous, reverses a little off-center, weight 2.387 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Parion (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 4th Century B.C.; obverse bull standing left, looking right, ΠA/PI in two lines above and below bull, phiale or shield (control symbol) below; reverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), surrounded by snakes; ex Forum (2015); $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00











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