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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!

Gargara, Troas, c. 440 - 400 B.C.

|Troas|, |Gargara,| |Troas,| |c.| |440| |-| |400| |B.C.||hemiobol|NEW
Gargara, in Troas, was originally located on the heights of Mount Ida, but its citizens relocated to the foot of the mountain. In earlier times settlements relied on natural strongholds for protection against frequent attacks by marauding bands or pirates. As civilization took hold, the commercial opportunities afforded by easier access became more important.
GA97792. Silver hemiobol, unpublished in standard refs.; see Numismatik Naumann auction 88 (5 Apr 2020), 142; Savoca Numismatik auction 84 (30 Aug 2020), 97, VF, toned, a little rough, tiny edge chips, weight 0.319 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Gargara (Ayvacik, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 400 B.C.; obverse female head left; reverse Γ - A across field at center divided by an incuse "basketball" pattern divided into six compartments; extremely rare; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 405 - 390 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |405| |-| |390| |B.C.||AE| |9|NEW
Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess and the city are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called the King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB97790. Bronze AE 9, SNG Kayhan 147 ff., SNG München 34, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, VF/F, green patina, porous, weight 0.451 g, maximum diameter 8.8 mm, die axis 135o, Ephesos mint, c. 405 - 390 B.C.; obverse bee with curved wings, seen from above, within a linear circle; reverse head of stag right, E-Φ (Ephesos) divided across field, all within a round incuse; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
"This reverse is modeled after the famous statue of the Spirit of the Roman People in the Roman Forum. It is unclear when this statue was last seen as it is now lost. Although the coins celebrate a wide range of spirits (e.g., Rome, Augustus, the Army, etc.), the basic design comes from the same statue...The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted." -- Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity 294-364 A.D. by Victor Failmezger
RT97966. Billon follis (large), Hunter V 46 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 70 (S), SRCV IV 14849, Cohen VII 51, Choice VF, brown patina, well centered, light marks, weight 6.387 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 311 A.D; obverse GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO IMPERATORIS (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor as Commander in Chief), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, Γ left, three pellets arranged in a vertical line in right field, MKV in exergue; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS98701. Silver drachm, Price 1828a, Müller Alexander 812, SNG Cop 916, Ch VF, well centered, attractive, light toning, flow lines, light marks, weight 4.204 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Φ left, KΠA monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Steven Battelle Ancient Coins; $400.00 SALE PRICE $320.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Struck shortly after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. Kolophon also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but undoubtedly the Alexander named on this coin was the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. The ruins of Kolophon are south of the town Degirmendere Fev in the Menderes district of Izmir Province, Turkey.
GS98704. Silver drachm, Price 1750, Müller Alexander 313, HGC 3.1 944c, SNG Cop -, aVF, bumps and scratches, tight flan, weight 4.164 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, barley grain kernel left, spear head upright right, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; $280.00 SALE PRICE $220.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|
In 299, Galerius established the Peace of Nisibis with the Persian king Narseh, the Romans retained dominion over Armenia and northern Mesopotamia, and the Tigris became the boundary between Rome and the Sassanid Empire.
RL94836. Copper post-reform radiate, RIC VI Cyzicus 15a, SRCV IV 12834, Cohen VI 34 var. (also draped), Hunter V 82 var. (same), gVF, full legends on flan, earthen encrustations, scratches, weight 2.422 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 294/6 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Diocletian on left, standing right, baton in left hand, receiving from Victory from Jupiter with right hand, Victory standing on globe and offering wreath, Jupiter on right, standing left, nude but for paludamentum over shoulders, long scepter vertical in left hand, KΓ in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.||antoninianus|
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontiers:
- Nicomedia (northwestern Asia Minor) became capital for Diocletian
- Mediolanum (Milan, near the Alps) became the capital for Maximian
- Augusta Treverorum (Trier, in Germany) became the capital for Constantius Chlorus
- Sirmium (Serbia, on the Danube border) became the capital for Galerius
RL94838. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 61 (also 1st officina), RIC V-2 306, Cohen VI 33, SRCV IV 12635, Choice VF, highlighting earthen deposits (desert patina), weight 4.368 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 293 - 294 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped bust right, from behind; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Diocletian on left, standing right, wearing military garb, baton (or parazonium) in left hand, receiving from Victory from Jupiter with right hand, Victory standing on globe and offering wreath, Jupiter on right, standing left, nude but for paludamentum over shoulders, long scepter vertical in left hand, A in low center, XXI• in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Mallos, Cilicia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Mallos,| |Cilicia,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Mallos was an ancient city of Cilicia Campestris (later Cilicia Prima) lying near the mouth of the Pyramus (now the Ceyhan Nehri) river, in Anatolia. In ancient times, the city was situated at the mouth of the Pyramus (which has changed course since), on a hill opposite Magarsa (or Magarsus) which served as its port. The district was called from it, Mallotis. The location of the site is currently inland a few km from the Mediterranean coast on an elevation in the Karatas Peninsula, Adana Province, Turkey, a few km from the city of Karatas.
GB98567. Bronze AE 18, SNG Levante 1264, SNG BnF 1919, Lindgren I 1542, BMC Cilicia -, RPC I -, gF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, obverse off center, weight 4.580 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mallos (near Karatas, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse statue of Athena Megaris standing facing, within wreath; reverse eagle flying right, monogram left under wing, MALLΩ/TΩN in two lines below; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. Late 3rd Century B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |Late| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |13|
From the Errett Bishop Collection.

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB93592. Bronze AE 13, cf. Baldwin Lampsakos plate IX 19-21; BMC Mysia p. 85, 65, Weber 5123, gF, rough green patina, scratches, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 90o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. late 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head Poseidon right; reverse ΛAM, forepart of Pegasos right, dolphin right below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT97965. Billon follis, Hunter V 159 (also 6th officina), RIC VII Cyzicus 4 (R), SRCV IV 15218, Cohen VII 71, aVF, traces of silvering, tight flan, porous, weight 2.961 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, S right, SMK in exergue; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50











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