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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!

Thyatira, Lydia, 2nd Century B.C.

|Thyatira|, |Thyatira,| |Lydia,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|
We were unable to identify another specimen with the monogram right. It may be present on some published or online specimens that are just too worn or off center. This same monogram is found on other types from Thyatira.
GB91506. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 571 var.; SNGvA 3199 var.; SNG Munchen 574 var.; SNG Tübingen 3836 var.; BMC Lydia p. 292, 4 var.; et al. - (none with monogram), gF, beautiful jade-like patina, earthen deposits, small edge chips, weight 3.125 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Thyatira (Akhisar, Turkey) mint, 2nd Century B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right; reverse double-axe (labrys), ΘYATEI/PH-NΩN in two lines staring above, below divided by shaft, monogram to right of axe blade; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; rare variety; $90.00 (€82.80)


L'Atelier D'Amaseia du Pont, Recherches Historiques et Numismatiques

|Greek| |Books|, |L'Atelier| |D'Amaseia| |du| |Pont,| |Recherches| |Historiques| |et| |Numismatiques|
The Amaseia [Pontos] workshop of the bridge, historical and numismatic research.
BK22361. L'Atelier D'Amaseia du Pont, Recherches Historiques et Numismatiques by Dalaison, Julie, 2008, in French, 233 pages, 69 plates, soft cover, very good condition, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $65.00 (€59.80)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 310 - 284 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |310| |-| |284| |B.C.||AE| |16|
Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
GB95289. Bronze AE 16, SNG BnF 1568 ff., SNG Cop 331 var. (ethnic below), SNGvA -, BMC Mysia -, F, green patina, scratches, porosity, pitting, encrustations, weight 3.864 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 284 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse head and neck of bull right, monogram right, ΠEPΓA above, thunderbolt below; $50.00 (€46.00)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darios I to Xerxes II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

|Persian| |Lydia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Lydia,| |Anatolia,| |
Darios| |I| |to| |Xerxes| |II,| |c.| |485| |-| |420| |B.C.||daric|
This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SL97378. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, Group A/B (pl. XIII, 27); Meadows Administration 321; BMC Arabia pl. XXIV, 26; Sunrise 24; Lydo-Milesian standard, NGC MS, strike 5/5, surface 3/5, flan flaw (4629125-050), weight 8.30 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; ex Heritage auction 231925 (20 Jun 2019), lot 63061; NGC| Lookup; $3500.00 (€3220.00)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes II - Artaxerxes II, c. 420 - 375 B.C.

|Persian| |Lydia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Lydia,| |Anatolia,| |Xerxes| |II| |-| |Artaxerxes| |II,| |c.| |420| |-| |375| |B.C.||daric|
This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH97377. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, group C (pl. XIV, 42); BMC Arabia pl. XXV, 12; SNG Cop 276; Meadows Administration 323; Sunrise 28, aEF, well centered, edge scrape/damage, weight 8.081 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 420 - 375 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; ex Heritage auction 232040 (30 Sep 2020), lot 61098; $2200.00 (€2024.00)


Lycian League, Lycia, c. 167 - 84 B.C.

|Lycia|, |Lycian| |League,| |Lycia,| |c.| |167| |-| |84| |B.C.||AE| |15|
The chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia, composed of the parts of three animals - a lion, a snake, and a goat or stag. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ending with a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GB96096. Bronze AE 15, Troxell Lycia, period 1, quadruple unit, p. 18, 1; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Lycia -, F, dark green patina with earthen highlighting, weight 2.446 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 0o, Xanthos Valley mint, c. 167 - 84 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Bellerophon facing; reverse chimera to right, ΛUKIΩN above; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; very rare; $180.00 (€165.60)


Kyme, Aiolis, 2nd Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|
The types on this coin are unusual. In a recent auction, Nomos AG noted the male figure in the chariot is not only wearing military garb but on some specimens also appears to have a laurel wreath on his head (not visible on this coin). If he is laureate, he could be a Roman emperor, which would date this type to the 1st or early 2nd century A.D. We agree, the long accepted Hellenistic date for this type could be wrong.
GB96107. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 113; SNGvA 1644; SNG Munchen 512; BMC Troas p. 113, 96, aVF, slightly rough, die damage reverse center, obverse off center, weight 3.797 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse Artemis standing right, long torch in left hand, quiver and bow on back, clasping right hands with Amazon Kyme, Kyme standing left, transverse scepter in left hand, K-Y flanking the figures; reverse two figures in a slow quadriga right, draped female (Kyme?) in front holding reins, male behind, wearing military dress, holding a long transverse spear; $60.00 (€55.20)


Gambrion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Gambrion,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |9|
Gambrium (or Gambrion, Gambreium or Gambreion) was a town of ancient Aeolis and of Mysia, quite close to Pergamum. It is on a hill named Hisarlik in the Bakirçay valley and very close to modern town of Poyracik in Izmir province, Turkey. The name of Gambrion is seen first in the book of Anabasis of Xenophon which discusses the region in 399 B.C. At that time the ruler of the city was Gorgion and the earliest coins of the city bear his name. Gambrion peaked during the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom in the third and second centuries B.C.
GB96089. Bronze AE 9, von Fritze Mysiens, p. 142, 419; SNG BnF 938; SNG Cop 145; Waddington 777, VF, nice green patina, tight flan, obverse a little off center, weight 0.609 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 225o, Gambrion (Poyracik, Izmir, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse ΓA-M (counterclockwise from below - ), facing gorgoneion, neat hair, protruding tongue; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)


Assos, Troas, c. 479 - 450 B.C.

|Troas|, |Assos,| |Troas,| |c.| |479| |-| |450| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Though the town is officially named Behramkale, most people still call it by its ancient name, Assos. The town is on the coast of the Adramyttian Gulf on the southern side of Biga Peninsula, just north of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GS96090. Silver hemiobol, SNG Arikantürk 295; Weber 5318; BMC Troas p. 36, 3; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Ashmolean –, VF, centered on a tight flan, toned, porosity, weight 0.286 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 180o, Assos (Behramkale, Turkey) mint, c. 479 - 450 B.C.; obverse griffin reclining right, left forepaw raised; reverse lion head right, jaws open, tongue protruding, within incuse square; $110.00 (€101.20)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Nikomedes I, c. 279 - 255 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Nikomedes| |I,| |c.| |279| |-| |255| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Nicomedes I was the first King of Bithynia to strike coins. He is primarily known for bringing the Gauls known as Galatians to the Asia Minor in 277 B.C. to fight against his brother and Antiochus I. This short-sighted mistake brought troubles for local Greeks for a century. About 264 B.C., according to Eusebius, he moved the capital to Nicomedia on the Propontis. Mørkholm describes the very similar portrait of Nikomedes on his tetradrachms as "the realistic portrait of an aged king with large and rugged facial features."
GB96095. Bronze AE 17, Rec Gen I-2 p. 219, 4, & pl. 29, 5; HGC 7 609 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; BMC Pontus -, F, scratches, corrosion, rough, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, c. 279 - 255 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the King right; reverse Warrior goddess Artemis-Bendis seated left on rock, two vertical spears in right hand, left hand resting on sword in sheath, circular shield on ground leaning on rock on near side, tree behind on far side of rock, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) downward on right, NIKOMH∆OY (Nikomedes) downward on left, EP monogram outer left; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $500.00 (€460.00)











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