Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Nov 21, 2019

Nov 20, 2019

Nov 18, 2019

Nov 17, 2019

Nov 16, 2019
Byzantine Coins
Medieval & Modern Coins

Nov 14, 2019

Nov 13, 2019

Nov 12, 2019

Nov 11, 2019

Nov 10, 2019

Nov 09, 2019

Nov 02, 2019
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies| ▸ |Alexander the Great||View Options:  |  |  |   

Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C.

Alexander the Great is arguably the most famous man of antiquity. Born a leader, his genius and charisma led the Macedonian Army across the world creating an empire that covered most of the then-known world, from Greece to India. He was regarded as a god and his fame grew even greater after his premature death at thirty-three. His reign marks the beginning of the Hellenistic Age, a time when almost every aspect of human civilization flourished. His coinage is highly complex, struck in cities all over the ancient map and spanning over two hundred years. The representative types are the silver tetradrachms and drachms depicting an idealized portrait of Alexander in the guise of the mythical hero Heracles, and his gold staters depicting Athena.Map of Alexander's Empire


Koinon of Macedonia, Portrait of Alexander the Great, 231 - 235 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year. The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
GB92396. Bronze triassarion, AMNG III 341, RPC Online -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Saroglos -, McClean -, Lindgren -, VF/F, near black patina, high points a bit flatly struck, light corrosion heavier at edge, central depressions, weight 9.353 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, reign of Severus Alexander, 231 - 235; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY clockwise on right, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ ONΩN NE (NE ligate), Zeus standing half left, head left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $300.00 (€264.00)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The First Syrian War broke out in 276, when Ptolemy II invaded Syria, seizing Damascus. Antiochus defeated the invasion and in 274 married his daughter to Ptolemy’s half brother Magas, governor of Cyrenaica. Supported by Antiochus, Magas declared himself independent and invaded Egypt. Aided by a mutiny of Ptolemy’s Gallic mercenaries he nearly reached Alexandria. Magas was forced to retreat when, encouraged by Arisnoe, Libya invaded Cyrenaica. In 274, Ptolemy went on the offensive and captured much of the Cilician coast. Antiochus was forced to admit defeat. Egypt gained western Cilicia, southern Lycia, Caunus, Halicarnassus, Myndus, Cnidus, probably Miletus, all of Phoenicia (including Tyre), and the Marsyas valley in Syria, but not Damascus.
GP89316. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B322, Svoronos 635 (1 spec.), SNG Cop 479, Cox Curium 75, aF, dark patina, weight 4.251 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, Tyre mint, c. 274 - 271 B.C.; obverse diademed, horned head of deified Alexander the Great right, long flowing hair; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings slightly open, Z over vertical club handle up in left field; from a New England collector; rare; $50.00 (€44.00)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response, he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch, and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9. The Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power during his reign.
GP93410. Bronze obol, Lorber CPE B369; Svoronos 976; SNG Cop 232; BMC Alexandria p. 66, 41; Weiser 94 var. (EP monogram); Noeske 166 var. (same); Hosking -, VF, brown tone, light marks, spots of light corrosion, reverse slightly off center, central depressions, obverse edge beveled, weight 11.260 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head turned back right, wings closed, cornucopia across shoulder bound with royal diadem, E monogram between legs; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 - 180 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The name of Ptolemy V Epiphanes appears on the Rosetta stone. He married Cleopatra I, the daughter of the Seleukid king Antiochos III, and was the father of Ptolemy VI, VII, and Cleopatra II. Ptolemy V lost Judea, Philistia, and Phoenicia to Antiochos III after the battle of Panium in 198 B.C. (Dan 11:13-16).
GP93412. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1236, SNG Cop 249, SNG Milan 291, Noeske 182, Malter 185, Faucher-Lorber Series 6E, Weiser -, Hosking -, aVF, brown tone, light marks and corrosion, slightly off center, central depressions, weight 9.306 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 197 - 182 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great wearing elephant-scalp headdress; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing half left on thunderbolt, head left, wings spread, no control symbols; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 (€61.60)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS92993. Silver drachm, Price 1809, Müller Alexander 263, SNG München 522, SNG Cop 922, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, light toning, well centered on a tight flan, flow lines, mild die wear, weight 4.151 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, crescent horns left over TI monogram in left field, Π under throne; ex Barry P. Murphy; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Kaunos, Caria, c. 309 - 189 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 189 B.C. the Roman senate put Kaunos under Rhodes. In 167, Kaunos and other cities revolted against Rhodes. As a result, Rome removed Rhodes' authority. In 129, Rome established the Province of Asia, covering a large part of western Anatolia. Kaunos was assigned to Lycia. When Mithridates invaded in 88 B.C., the Kaunians joined him and killed all the Romans in the city. After the peace of 85 B.C. as part of their punishment, Kaunos was again put under Rhodian administration.
GB92795. Bronze AE 10, SNG Keckman 75; SNGvA 8100; SNG Cop 184; BMC Caria p. 75, 12, F, tight flan, porous, weight 0.981 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, die axis 180o, Kaunos (Dalyan, Turkey) mint, c. 309 - 189 B.C.; obverse diademed young head (Alexander the Great?) right; reverse cornucopia bound with fillet, K-AY (AY in monogram) divided across field; scarce; $30.00 (€26.40)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
There are two primary reverse styles for Alexander the Great tetradrachms: an archaic "lifetime" style with Zeus' legs uncrossed, and a more refined Hellenistic style with Zeus' right leg drawn back. The transition between the two styles occurred around the time of Alexander's death. This type, struck in year 26 of King Azemilkos, was minted with both reverse styles. Our specimen with "crossed legs" was likely struck in 322 or 321 B.C., shortly after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV under the regent Perdiccas.
GS91529. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3265, Newell Dated Ake 24b (obv. die XIX), SNG München 729, cf. Cohen DCA 736 (archaic style), HGC 10 3, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, VF, high relief, obverse off center, graffiti on rev., punch on rev., uneven toning, bumps, scratches, porosity, weight 17.006 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, c. 322 - 321 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Zeus seated left, throne without back, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, Phoenician on left: (Z= of King Azemilkos) over lll lll= ([year] 26); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

Click for a larger photo
Azemilkos ('zmlk) was the King of Tyre when, in 332 B.C., Alexander had already peacefully taken Byblos and Sidon. Tyre sent envoys to Alexander agreeing to do his bidding. He declared that he wished to enter the city to sacrifice to Melqart. Azemilkos was with the Persian fleet at the time, and the Tyrians, unsure who would win the war, responded that they would obey any other command but that neither Persians nor Macedonians could enter the city. When Alexander captured the city, Azemilkos and other notables, including envoys from Carthage, had taken refuge in the temple of Melqart. Alexander spared their lives. In 331 B.C., Alexander sent his somatophylakes (bodyguard) Menes of Pella to govern Syria, Phoenicia, and Cilicia, entrusting him at the same time with 3000 talents.
SH91738. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3292, Newell Dated Ake 41 (obv. die XXXIV), Cohen DCA 737, HGC 10 3, Müller Alexander -, SNG München -, SNG Saroglos -,, VF, well centered, tight flan, toned, weight 16.957 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 270o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, struck under Menes, 309 - 308 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, Phoenician date left: lll lll-= (year 36 of King Azemilkos); $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

Click for a larger photo
Azemilkos ('zmlk) was the King of Tyre when, in 332 B.C., Alexander had already peacefully taken Byblos and Sidon. Tyre sent envoys to Alexander agreeing to do his bidding. He declared that he wished to enter the city to sacrifice to Melqart. Azemilkos was with the Persian fleet at the time, and the Tyrians, unsure who would win the war, responded that they would obey any other command but that neither Persians nor Macedonians could enter the city. When Alexander captured the city, Azemilkos and other notables, including envoys from Carthage, had taken refuge in the temple of Melqart. Alexander spared their lives. In 331 B.C., Alexander sent his somatophylakes (bodyguard) Menes of Pella to govern Syria, Phoenicia, and Cilicia, entrusting him at the same time with 3000 talents.
GS91739. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3295a (same dies), Müller Alexander 1448, Newell Dated Ake 44, Cohen DCA 737, HGC 10 3, SNG München -, SNG Saroglos -, Choice VF, well centered, nice style Zeus, toned, weight 16.995 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 210o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, 309 - 308 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, Phoenician date left: lll lll-= over ll (year 38 of King Azemilkos); $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91995. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82.2d, Price 3756, SNG Saroglos 649, Müller Alexander 741, HGC 9 10f, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, superb style in sculptural high-relief, light marks, graffiti on reverse upper left, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 17.110 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI over crescent horns upward in left field, MYHP monogram within wreath under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; ex FORVM (2009); $500.00 (€440.00)
 




  






REFERENCES|

Arena, V. "New Acquisitions at the British Museum: additions to Price, Alexander, and the 1870 Larnaca Hoard" in NC 163 (2003).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity. (Lancaster, 2011).
Davesne, A. & G. Le Rider. Le trésor de Meydancikkale. (Paris, 1989).
Duyrat, F. Arados Hellénistique: Étude historique et monétaire. (Beirut, 2005).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1935).
Head, B. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Hersh, C. "Additions and Corrections to Martin J. Price's 'The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus'" in Studies Price.
Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Le Rider, G. Alexander the Great: Coinage, Finances, and Policy. (Philadelphia, 2007).
Liampi, K. "A Hoard of Bronze Coins of Alexander the Great" in Studies Price.
Liampi. K. "Zur Chronologie der sogenannten 'anonymen' mekedonischen Münzen des späten 4. Jhs. v. Chr." in JNG XXXVI. (1986).
Lindgren, H & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. (New York, 1985).
Müller, L. Die Münzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Müller, L. Numismatique d'Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Newell, E. Alexander Hoards II, Demanhur, 1905, ANSNNM 19. (New York, 1923).
Noe, S. The Alexander coinage of Sicyon. (New York, 1950).
Pick, B. & K. Regling. Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Möesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/II. (Berlin, 1910).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Svoronos, J. Ta Nomismata tou Kratous ton Ptolemaion. (Athens, 1904-08).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer. Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Makedonien-Könige, 10/11 Heft. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 3: Macedonia. (London, 1976).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece II, The Alpha Bank Collection, Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece IV, Numismatic Museum Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
Thompson, M., & A. Bellinger. Greek Coins in the Yale Collection, IV: A Hoard of Alexander Drachms. (New Haven, 1955).
Troxell, H. Studies in the Macedonian coinage of Alexander the Great. (New York, 1997).
Troxell, H. "The Peloponnesian Alexanders" in ANSMN 17 (New York, 1971).
von Prokesch-Osten, A. "Liste des Alexandres de ma collection qui ne se trouvent pas dans le catalogue de Mr. L. Müller" in NZ1 (Constantinople, 1869).
von Prokesch-Osten, A. "Suite des monnaies inédites d'or et d'argent d'Alexandre le Grand" in NZ 3 (Constantinople, 1873).
Wartenberg, U. & J. Kagan, "Some Comments on a New Hoard from the Balkan Sea" in Travaux Le Rider.

Catalog current as of Friday, November 22, 2019.
Page created in 2.797 seconds.
Alexander the Great